Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Commercially Roasted Beans and their Appearance

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Commercially Roasted Beans and their Appearance

    After much deliberation and gnashing of teeth, the social club at my workplace decided that paying $4 for a reasonable cup of coffee was over the top, and so they paid $3k for a Jura something or other Super Auto (because it self cleans, you dont have to do anything to it!).

    Yes, I mentioned that the amount they paid would get them a cracking HX and grinder, you can lead the horse to the water....

    Anyway, they are buying beans in 250g bags from the local roaster.

    I roast at home, so Im using that as a reference point.

    The commercial beans look like confectionery. They have a consistent oily sheen on all the beans. I dont get that in my beans at home, I get a spot of oil on some beans if I roast for a tad longer than I like, but thats it.

    Is it from the length of time that the beans are in the bag? That the beans sweat this oil?

    Anyway, Im still heading across the road for $4 coffees, and then slamming 3 or 4 down when I get home. The Jura coffee tastes like... words escape me.

    Brendan

  • #2
    Re: Commercially Roasted Beans and their Appearance

    The oil could be because of a longer roast time and could also be from age.

    Any idea when they were roasted?

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Commercially Roasted Beans and their Appearance

      No idea at all. The bag had a best before date on it, which was still a few weeks away. Im assuming that its a combination of both age and roast. This places espresso blend tasted like ash (CS11 ish) , and the place it was bought from is a small grocery store that has probably had the stock in the shop for 3 months.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Commercially Roasted Beans and their Appearance

        Originally posted by 323D3127353232500 link=1294707484/0#0 date=1294707484
        They have a consistent oily sheen on all the beans. I dont get that in my beans at home
        ..because you dont roast to CS11 and dont leave them sitting in the bag for months and months.

        Sounds like you need to roast some for work to show em the difference good fresh coffee can make.
        8-)

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Commercially Roasted Beans and their Appearance

          I second the previous posts, usually oily due to a longer roast, pushing dark, or, old beans. Always buy beans with a roasted on date. Coffee with a best before date is almost guaranteed to be stale by the time you purchase them.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Commercially Roasted Beans and their Appearance

            learnt my one thing for today! Thanks Andy!

            i always wondered why some beans from the Supermarket looked really greasy and oil covered.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Commercially Roasted Beans and their Appearance

              I have been surprised by the number of people who given good coffee then suggest instant is better because it is easier.

              sometimes it seems that quality and taste is more to do with image than flavor

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Commercially Roasted Beans and their Appearance

                Petanque, thats the funny thing. This guys beans look good to the casual buyer. There are brown, and shiny, and must be full of goodness. But they taste pretty ordinary. So why would you roast them that way?

                Still, hes the guy with the roasting business, and Im the guy sitting in an office, so whos laughing now?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Commercially Roasted Beans and their Appearance

                  Roasted beans covered in oil will usually taste quite ashy when you are used to a sweeter, lighter roast, which is why i steer clear of them. At that level of roast degree youve pretty much lose all nuance of the bean origin and are imparting a heap of roast ash flavour to the beans - im talking well beyond second crack! If you are using quality beans, you wouldnt want to do this for obvious reasons. Its like a charred black steak compared to medium rare.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Commercially Roasted Beans and their Appearance

                    Hmm.. *confused*

                    Originally posted by 67686472606767050 link=1294707484/0#0 date=1294707484
                    Anyway, they are buying beans in 250g bags from the local roaster.  
                    Originally posted by 67686472606767050 link=1294707484/2#2 date=1294710211
                    ..and the place it was bought from is a small grocery store that has probably had the stock in the shop for 3 months.  
                    So are they buying from roaster or grocery store/supermarket?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Commercially Roasted Beans and their Appearance

                      Sorry for the confusion. The grocery store (over the road) stocks these beans which are roasted locally (about 50km away, yes, thats local for us). Staff members are buying them from the grocery store.

                      My point was that the beans havent had to be shipped in a container and warehoused, they are pretty much just delivered by a guy from the roaster in a van.

                      S :-[

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Commercially Roasted Beans and their Appearance

                        Hello BL....

                        taking the (entirely appropriate) wholistic approach:

                        Oily beans are not indicative of "commercially roasted"...it is indicative of someones (anyones) personal or individual taste, preference and style of roasting, to cater for what they believe is their customer base or market, not to mention their individual expertise.

                        If the shop has other blends / coffees, try a different type and see if the beans look the same.

                        You have taken the time to ask about this in the CS Forum, so you could also may I suggest, make direct contact with the roaster, explain your enquiry nicely, and see what suggestions he offers.

                        Also (and before calling the roaster) ...look past the oiliness on those beans and try to determine the colour of the beans themselves. Are you in a hot or humid climate? There is always more to this than meets the eye and it could be the packets have been heated up in transport, storage and or in the shop etc. Handling the packets in less than ideal conditions can well cause sweating & excess oiliness and premature staling in espresso type (colour) and darker blends so we should not always blame the thing that comes to mind first.

                        The Jura is another story and you will find enough posts from me in this forum indicating strongly, that your machine will perform to the level of the expertise of the person who is responsible for the set up and ongong daily maintenance of the machine.

                        Autos need to be reset to your choice of beans as soon as they come out of the box, default settings are nothing more than a factory preset before going into the carton, and someone needs to be responsible for and keep after an auto just like any other coffee machine.

                        Incidentally, autos HATE oily coffee, and you may have a combination of factors operating together where for example, the oily coffee and less than optimum machine settings will make the coffee worse.

                        Start by securing coffee that is "cinnamon" coloured and not oily, reset the machine to suit, and see what happens. The ashy character will disappear straight up.

                        This is all good stuff in the journey to a better cup of coffee.

                        Regardz,
                        Attilio
                        very first Cs site sponsor.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Commercially Roasted Beans and their Appearance

                          Fresh Coffee, thanks for your input. If my post came across as meaning that all commercially roasted beans are less than ideal, I apologise. I understand that there are many roasters who care a great deal about the product they sell and their customers reception of that product.

                          This roaster has several origin roasted beans, and they all look similar, with an oily sheen. I realise that there are factors beyond his control, as you mentioned, however it appears that he leans towards a darker roast. It may be his favourite roast, and the way he likes his coffee, and I may be in the small minority that dont find his beans that flash.

                          But my point was more about the oily, almost sugar coated appearance.

                          I roasted a batch of Wahgi (80%) and Yirg (20%) for the Jura and filled the hopper with it yesterday. I havent had any comments about whether it was better or worse, so I have to assume that the majority of people buying and drinking coffee (and hence paying the $$) arent that bothered.

                          And unfortunately Im the mug who had to set the Jura up. We have had some My milk isnt hot enough issues, but I think Ive sorted that out. Ive refined the strength, the water volume, and the milk volume and temp, and grinding as fine as possible, however I by no means assume that it is perfect.

                          Again, thanks for your input Attilio, its appreciated.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Commercially Roasted Beans and their Appearance

                            Hello BL,

                            a very thoughtful reply that raises other legitimate issues (some of them I wont go near unless I am pushed   )

                            You are in the minority that appreciates better coffee. Nothing wrong with that. On the basis of your reply I would recommend changing the supply and look for a cinnamon colored blend with little sweated oil. Occasional drops here and there are fine, just not what the masses would call "caramel" which is a name that usually conjures up that look of beans completed covered in that sheen of oiliness.


                            Sounds like you have tried hard to get the machine right. It will only want a better source of beans now, and then readjustment to suit.

                            I can suggest something simple that will make the milk hotter for your coffee luddite work colleagues if necessary  ;D

                            Rgdz,
                            A.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Commercially Roasted Beans and their Appearance

                              Attilio, Ive swung the Froth/Steam/Milk selector switch (the one that rotates, where the milk come out) and told people that if they want it hot, it needs to be close to, but not in, the steam section. Also if you only want milk, not half a cup of froth, use the Milk part of the rotator switch, not the froth part.

                              Our other sources of beans are standard supermarket varieties. Ill have a look down there over lunchtime, and see if anything suitable pops its head up.

                              Ive offered home roasted ones (mainly to fund my crack coffee habit) but they have said they wont pay me, they want legitimate receipts from an ABN registered organisation. Bloody audit trails!!!

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X