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  • Turkish Coffee (How to & thoughts)

    My Parents came back from QATAR in the middle east from working over there and brought back some IBRIKs of various sizes.  (Turkish Coffee Pots).  I tried my hand and making one today and had to google how to make them as I was unsure as to quanities of coffee, sugar, water and technique.

    What I found.

    1.  Start with Sugar,  I didnt mind this as I like a good sweet coffee from time to time.
    2.  Fill the Ibrik with cool or cold water, to where the neck of the Ibik becomes thinner.
    3.  Grind the coffee on the finest possible grind. (Needs to be like baby powder consistancy.)
    4.  I used my Portafilter single basket to measure going on the same ratio of espresso (one filter basket for one serve of Turkish Coffee, although more water will be used of course).
    5.  DO NOT stir the coffee into the water just yet, this will be done later.
    6  Place Ibrik over the gas stove and a medium heat and wait for it to start foaming. (Do not allow Foam to rise over the top of the Ibrik)
    7. Take the Ibrik off the stove and give it a stir with a spoon, this will reduce the foam on top and stir the coffee into the liquid better.
    8. Place the Ibrik back onto the stove (maybe even try turning the heat down a little, to extend the period of Foam forming again.
    9.  Once the foam rises, take it off again, Stir and place back onto the stove for the 3rd time.
    10.  Once the Coffee has foamed to the top again you may take it off the stove or optionally replace it back on for a 4th Time.
    11.  The foam can be disgarded or used like cappuccino froth and place in the cups.
    12. Pour coffee into each cup, but advise guests to try and not drink the bottom as the coffee grinds will fall to the bottom of the cup and will be an unplesant finish to the coffee.

    I used 3 teaspoons of sugar as I thought the coffee was going to be really strong, but found this too much and maybe 1.5 - 2 tsp sugar will be ample enough next time I make it.

    I think because you add the sugar first and the sugar is sitting at the bottom of the Ibrik when heating it up, the sugars a caramalised and form a sweeter flavouring than just adding sugar into your cup afterwards.

    Some also add milk and I did as well jus to try both the black version and milk version.  I like both, so gives me an additional option.

    All in all a pleasant drink and will definately add this to my repertoire of coffee making.

    P.S by the way, I used the Delano Tuscany roasted beans that I won from Gilkatho Coffee. Since I had 5 kg I have plenty of bean to play around with to try different coffee ideas and styles.

  • #2
    Re: Turkish Coffee (How to & thoughts)

    This is the way I was taught to make it by a friend who married a greek.

    Is strong - yet yummy.
    I must try making it again now thaat I have a decent grinder and can grind my coffee extra fine.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Turkish Coffee (How to & thoughts)

      My grandparents have their coffee this way, it really does remind me of their routine, the enamelled ibrik (white enamel on inside, blue on outside) that seems to be the same one all this time.
      Once I got into the stovetops, I asked them to show me about turkish coffee. I tasted it, very sweet, and didnt really appeal to me.
      I would like to grind some coffee very fine to give them a fresh batch of coffee to try their way with. Ill have to look into what kind of roast I should do with the Ethiopian Yirgechaffe I have.

      Thanks for the post Goodies!

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      • #4
        Re: Turkish Coffee (How to & thoughts)

        Stoveboy - try a darker roast for the Ibrik as the flavours need to cut through the sugar. Yirgy seems to benefit from being a darker roast too.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Turkish Coffee (How to & thoughts)

          OK, heres the way we do it (Greek heritage household):

          Firstly you have to decide how sweet you want the coffee.
          Even a lot of Greeks dont like it without sugar (sketos) so the most common method is "metrios", one sugar per cup.

          Less commonly someone will ask for a "sweet" one (glikos); two sugars.
          Real sweet tooths will demand a "vari glikos"; 3 sugars. *shudder

          Measure the water, using the cups theyll be served in.
          One cup of water for each (and my wife likes to add one more for good measure).
          Use one heaped teaspoon of coffee for each cup plus sugar as above.

          Use a medium low heat and stir until the coffee is dissolved: dont stir again.
          Heat until it froths up and then remove from the heat.
          The foam is called kaïmaki.

          Share the kaïmaki between the cups and then top up all the cups with the coffee; try not to disturb the kaïmaki.

          Done!

          Note: My wifes method, with the extra cup of water, is to avoid getting as much sediment into the cups. I dont mind either way.

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          • #6
            Re: Turkish Coffee (How to & thoughts)

            So TG, you only heat the once until the froth rises then take off the heat.

            I was wondering why the Ibrik is put back on the heat another 2 or 3 times after the first initial froth has formed for traditional Turkish Coffees?

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            • #7
              Re: Turkish Coffee (How to & thoughts)

              Lets start by calling it "Byzantium Coffee", so we dont have any diplomatic impediments

              I always have it as per my username. 8-)

              Thundergod seems to have the method of preparation down pat.

              My dad used to use an electric birko to make it - always worked a treat.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Turkish Coffee (How to & thoughts)

                Originally posted by The Goodies link=1174113535/0#5 date=1174197518
                So TG, you only heat the once until the froth rises then take off the heat.
                Correct.

                Originally posted by The Goodies link=1174113535/0#5 date=1174197518
                I was wondering why the Ibrik is put back on the heat another 2 or 3 times after the first initial froth has formed for traditional Turkish Coffees?
                Thats the strange bit that impelled me to respond.

                My wife makes them these days, hence my mentioning her method.
                However when I was younger, my father ran a kafenio (Greek coffee shop) or two and I would go there after school to play the pinball machines and learn snooker.

                I also got roped in to making rizogolo (Greek rice pudding) and coffees.

                The way I wrote it above is how I was taught.
                If the the old Greek blokes didnt complain, then it must be right.


                Edit: Spelling

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                • #9
                  Re: Turkish Coffee (How to & thoughts)

                  Here is a picture of my Ibrik. Is this the same as the Greek style pots?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Turkish Coffee (How to & thoughts)

                    This is a pic of mine, handed down by my Mum, and made of aluminium - its older than I am.

                    Its my understanding that the tradition of bringing the coffee to the boil a few times is simply to brew/extract to an optimum level.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Turkish Coffee (How to & thoughts)

                      All the Lebanese I know froth it 3 times (some by boiling, others not). After this, it wont froth. How does this affect taste? Try it and see! This method of making coffee, of course, should not produce a drinkable brew; it is too hot and the grind too fine, the extraction too long. Yet, with the right coffee, it will produce an amazingly sweet (without sugar) and flavourful coffee. The roast should be dark, which will also increase the sweetness. Dark Lebanese, which is very oily, works better for this type of brewing method than any other, and does not taste burnt when made this way. I am told that some coffees should be made with sugar, and some not. I do not know which types, except that Yemen is considered the very best, and needs no sugar. This will come as no surprise to any coffee snob. Adding open cardamon pods when brewing is also very nice, or cinnamon when using sugar.

                      I have had the Greek style too, and loved it. A few drops of cold water and/or a few taps on the side of the pot after removing from the heat will quickly settle the grinds. This is also the purpose of the shape of the pot, being wider at the base and narrow at the neck.

                      This is a style of coffee that should be better known, and is a unique experience. Instead of putting sugar in the coffee, try a sweet pastry with your coffee. Yummo!

                      Matt

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Turkish Coffee (How to & thoughts)

                        Originally posted by Dolcimelo link=1174113535/0#10 date=1174218162
                        try a sweet pastry with your coffee. Yummo!

                        Matt
                        Great advice re the pastry Matt - Im luck enough to work near Ibrahims at Rockdale and enjoyed some of their baklava this evening!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Turkish Coffee (How to & thoughts)

                          Goodies, yours has a narrower opening than Ive seen before and Dennis yours appears to have a top about the same width as the base.

                          The ones Im used to would be about the same shape as Dennis but with a slightly smaller diameter top.

                          Goodies, as Dolcimelo said though, the wider base is a design feature and both yours and Dennis have this compared to the main body of the vessel so both would work equally as well.

                          Dennis, keep yours for sentimental and decorative purposes, we Greeks got rid of the aluminium ones years ago.
                          Look for a new Stainless Steel one.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Turkish Coffee (How to & thoughts)

                            Originally posted by Thundergod link=1174113535/0#12 date=1174226517
                            Dennis, keep yours for sentimental and decorative purposes, we Greeks got rid of the aluminium ones years ago.
                            Look for a new Stainless Steel one.
                            Oh no, TG - the aluminium ads flavour!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Turkish Coffee (How to & thoughts)

                              Originally posted by Dennis link=1174113535/0#11 date=1174219550
                              Great advice re the pastry Matt - Im luck enough to work near Ibrahims at Rockdale and enjoyed some of their baklava this evening!
                              Great stuff Dennis! Im just around the corner from Abla Pastry, and there is nothing nicer to have with a coffee - any coffee.

                              Matt

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