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Drinking Coffee in Zero Gravity

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  • Drinking Coffee in Zero Gravity

    http://www.wimp.com/coffeegravity/

  • #2
    Re: Drinking Coffee in Zero Gravity

    Hi all

    Well maybe it was tea, surely? I could see through the liquid! If it was coffee it was pretty piss weak. But then it may well have been Folgers made up a year before and heat sealed into that bag.
    Seeing that video means Ill cancel my NASA astronaut application tomorrow.

    There are many simple coffee machines that would work in zero G. The MyPressi, Aeropress, a plunger, any manual lever machine. One just needs to connect a tube up to them so the coffee is collected and then drunk ASAP.

    Mike

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    • #3
      Re: Drinking Coffee in Zero Gravity

      Originally posted by 6A697C757C767470727C190 link=1290672312/1#1 date=1290684955
      There are many simple coffee machines that would work in zero G. The MyPressi, Aeropress, a plunger, any manual lever machine. One just needs to connect a tube up to them so the coffee is collected and then drunk ASAP.
      Somehow I dont think so!  : To even get to that stage youll also have to think of a way to pour the hot water over coffee grounds and allow them to brew sufficiently

      This video is bloody cool though. Engineering design for rocket boosters at zero G used as a cup. Genius.  8-)

      If NASA needs a flight engineer or scientist to conduct experiments on coffee brewing in space, Im your man ;D

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      • #4
        Re: Drinking Coffee in Zero Gravity

        It was labeled coffee on the bag he pours it from.

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        • #5
          Re: Drinking Coffee in Zero Gravity

          As most coffee brewing methods and grinders rely on gravity to work, I think that Coffee Snobs in space may be driven to using coffee capsules or pods with a plumbed in espresso machine to get anything like good coffee.

          What chance is there of getting a roaster to work in zero G?

          As for the bag being labled coffee, many things labled coffee dont look or taste much like coffee.

          Barry

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          • #6
            Re: Drinking Coffee in Zero Gravity

            I dont see the problem. Space stations dont need to be zero G(according to movies) anyway as they can be set to spin giving gravity. Perhaps not as much gravity as earth but gravity all the same. Are the movies lying?

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            • #7
              Re: Drinking Coffee in Zero Gravity

              Movies nearly always lie! Rotation may work. Has there been any real space stations using this, though?
              Full immersion brewing in vacuum bags would work, just need large syringe style implements to transfer water and brewed coffee. Cold or hot brew, wouldnt matter! The leftover grinds would be a problem as waste unless there are some farms on the station... Probably pods have more waste than instant, too.
              IIRC I read the astronaut uses instant, dont have access to the vid on my phone at the moment!

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              • #8
                Re: Drinking Coffee in Zero Gravity

                looked like urine coming from a Catheter bag tube thing :P

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                • #9
                  Re: Drinking Coffee in Zero Gravity

                  Getting hot water might be a problem. The low air pressure would also lower the boiling point of the water.

                  Greg

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                  • #10
                    Re: Drinking Coffee in Zero Gravity

                    The air pressure at the ISS is reported as 1 atmosphere (~14.7psi)... Apart from some troubles theyve had e.g. In 2004.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Drinking Coffee in Zero Gravity

                      Originally posted by 5C534B5A4B4E4B2A0 link=1290672312/9#9 date=1290950910
                      The air pressure at the ISS is reported as 1 atmosphere (~14.7psi)... Apart from some troubles theyve had e.g. In 2004.
                      Wow--I didnt know that. So they can boil water and have it hot too!

                      Greg

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                      • #12
                        Re: Drinking Coffee in Zero Gravity

                        Haha, yeah - sounds so funny hearing it like that, but you are so right.

                        The difference between the physics and the common use of words can often perplex me!

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