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  • Malabar Monsoon Grind

    Hi Folks

    This is the first new post for me after popper roasting weekly now for about 9 months.

    I have tried about 8 or 9 different green beans to roast and some are easier than others, but I found the Indian Malabar Monsoon, (a large bean bleached to a pale colour by being left out to dry during the monsoon season) my most challenging roast to date. I am actually quite happy with the results as the roast takes a little longer than average so I have a more control with the extra time, and I have learned to leave it at least a week before tasting.

    One thing I did struggle with though was the grind - this one always needs a major adjustment to a much finer grind than I would universally use for the average bean. If I don't grind fine enough the coffee is way under extracted in my espresso machine (sunbeam EM6900), but to change over to any other bean I must adjust the grind back to my usual setting.

    Is it the beans, and how often does a particular bean desire a certain grind?

    Any advice appreciated

  • #2
    Yes, the MM requires a very fine grind. I have thrown out perfectly good MM roasts thinking there was something wrong with it. I usually rest it for 2 weeks as well but that won't change the fine grind required .

    A bean requires a change in grind when it needs it. Sorry, that is not that helpful but there are so many variables. Things that will influence grind are
    - bean type
    - bean age
    - brew method
    - climate
    - etc

    ..but you just have to adjust your grinder to produce the required result and only experience will determine the required grind for your equipment using the coffee you have a that time.

    What you could try is blending with the MM. Just add a small quantity (say 10 - 25%) to your next roast. This will reduce the need for such a fine grind.

    Comment


    • #3
      Hi dp.
      You haven't indicated how many MM roasts you have done and to what depth. I use a Behmor and roast the MM just into the first signs of the second crack and quickly cool (open door and fan).
      I would also wait at least 10 days (more better) before tasting.

      Being a harder bean there will be an adjustment on the grind from the softer (island) bean. You can get a feel for this by comparing the consistency of the grinds between your fingertips

      Also, as the bean ages and the changing environmental conditions can and will require further adjustments.

      Hope this helps and I am sure others here will expand on my input.
      Enjoy the journey!
      Last edited by Kevo; 9 November 2012, 08:20 AM. Reason: spelling

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks folks, I feel like a newbie at high school being looked after by the prefects!

        I have roasted the MM about 4 times, the first time pulling it out before 2nd crack because it had been in the popper for more than 30 minutes. I was not so happy with the taste so the next couple of roasts I took it into 2nd crack (not rolling) and was much happier with the results once I adjusted the grind, and let it sit for more than a week. I do like the blending idea, should be interesting as this bean is so large when green. MM has been my biggest challenge with my popper so far, I think my next order will be some nice easy South American beans, maybe I will muck around with some blending with my African and Indian stock.
        Cheers!

        Comment


        • #5
          I find that MM does not expand during roasting as much as other beans, so I put a little more in.

          I believe that many roasters could use more beans. With non MM beans I fill the popper up to the silver screw inside the chamber and get great results. Much more and they pop out of the chimney.

          If it is taking 30 minutes to roast the popper is definitely under loaded.

          I like MM a little darker than my other beans.

          Barry

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Barry_Duncan View Post
            If it is taking 30 minutes to roast the popper is definitely under loaded.
            That's interesting Barry.
            Not having used a popper for roasting, I can't agree/disagree with that statement, but I think along the lines of bean density to available heat input.
            IE: The more beans, the longer the roast time. To me, a 30min roast in a popper size batch would indicate too many beans.
            But, I imagine it would be like under/over dosing a porter filter basket, there has to be enough beans in the popper to be conducive to the heat available.
            Either way 30 min roast is way too long!

            Some useful info here: http://coffeesnobs.com.au/home-roast...ce-please.html

            FWIW: In the Behmor I often roast 350gms on the 1lb setting (a 20 min program) and usually hit "cool" with between 3 and 4 min remaining (start of 2C)

            Kevo

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Kevo View Post
              That's interesting Barry.
              Not having used a popper for roasting, I can't agree/disagree with that statement, but I think along the lines of bean density to available heat input.
              IE: The more beans, the longer the roast time. To me, a 30min roast in a popper size batch would indicate too many beans.
              But, I imagine it would be like under/over dosing a porter filter basket, there has to be enough beans in the popper to be conducive to the heat available.
              Either way 30 min roast is way too long!

              Some useful info here: http://coffeesnobs.com.au/home-roast...ce-please.html

              FWIW: In the Behmor I often roast 350gms on the 1lb setting (a 20 min program) and usually hit "cool" with between 3 and 4 min remaining (start of 2C)

              Kevo
              Hi Kevo, Barry is correct on under loading means longer roast time for a popper. It's all to do with air flow and heat retention in the popper chamber. Loading more would probably also mean manual stirring for a portion of the roast at the beginning as the weight of the beans prevents self agitation. The weight reduces as the beans lose its water content and self agitation eventually begins. 30 mins is well and truly baked in a popper.

              Comment


              • #8
                Saoy is right.

                Normally popper roasts are more like 10 minutes not 30. I don’t time mine. I go more on the sound and sight than time.

                I stir the beans with a wooden spoon handle until they stir by the air flow.

                Barry

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks Saoy and Barry,
                  If I had started out my roasting journey with a popper (almost did) I'd have been down that road.
                  I now consider myself further educated. (That's what this CS forum is all about eh!)

                  Comment

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