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  • beanbay. whats a good strong coffee to buy?

    I have bought 2 different coffee beans of bean bay and found both were bitter. whats a good strong coffee i can buy without the bitter taste?

  • #2
    You might get a more informed response if you tell us which ones you thought were bitter, whether you bought green or roasted beans, how you made the coffee, and with what equipment.

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    • #3
      Welcome justyou,

      FWIW, I honestly doubt it. Andy didn't win the recent Golden Bean comp. by chance.

      I think it's likely that you have issues with your extraction. This could be caused by your any or all of your gear, hygiene issues and your technique.

      Have a look over this training dvd for some good tips.

      Chris

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      • #4
        I have a delonghi automatic cofee machine.. its same as my picture..

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        • #5
          Originally posted by justyou81 View Post
          I have a delonghi automatic cofee machine..
          In which case you definitely have issues with your extraction!

          its same as my picture..
          It would appear that you are attempting to use a hydrangea to produce your coffee...

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Talk_Coffee View Post
            In which case you definitely have issues with your extraction!


            It would appear that you are attempting to use a hydrangea to produce your coffee...
            I think he means profile picture.

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            • #7
              My step sister in law had a delonghi auto, ended up only drinking tea when we stayed . She now has a pod thingy which is a vast improvement. Whether it was just her machine or they are all crook not sure.

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              • #8
                A friend has a delonghi like the one pictured in your profile justyou. He got way off track, starting fiddling with the control options and changing several setings at once. The end result was he ended up producing long weak bitter drinks and would use milk and sugar to make it palatable.

                My advice is re-read the manual. Test the effect of altering one setting at a time. I'd start by revisiting grind size and volume in the cup. Be prepared to pull the cup out from under the spouts if it starts to blond rather than just letting it run to the end.

                Like others have already said - it's unlikely to be the beans.

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                • #9
                  Thanks for the vote of confidence everyone!


                  While it's possible that I mucked up your roast I expect that someone else would have contacted me direct to let me know so I too would point the finger at the machine settings.

                  Let us know:

                  How long it takes to pour an espresso?
                  How much volume you have after the pour? (how many ml?)

                  Those two things will give us all an idea of what to try next.

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                  • #10
                    Morning all.

                    There are two kinds of common bitterness in espresso. a) That caused by the type of beans used, and B) that caused by using equipment that is not correctly set OR by not getting the ratio of espresso to milk right in the cup (ie caused by the operator).

                    Your automatic coffee machine does not extract coffee in the same way as a conventional espresso machine, but that doesnt mean you wont get a good coffee out of it as long as you work out the best settings for any particular type of beans used. This means you have to work out the grind and dose every time you change from one blend or single origin to another. This is because the density of the beans varies, and it is exactly the same principle as per a conventional machine and grinder.

                    Bitterness in your auto will be caused by two things, and it wont be the beans in this instance. Your grind will invariably be too coarse, and your dose may be too small. Also you may be making the espresso portion of your coffees too long (?). That said, my experience tells it will be grind / dose first up.

                    Fix them, and your coffee will smooth out. Most people go "the wrong way" when they are trying to cure the bitterness that they (the operator) induced into their brew through using incorrect setings, and that is by trying to weaken out the coffee.......INSTEAD of going the other way and making it stronger (usually some combination of finer grind and larger dose). This has the effect of smoothing out the brew, because it resuts in more coffee oils extracting out of the grinds into the liquid.

                    The usual simple rules of espresso making for conventional machines and grinders are NOT relevant to home use automatic machines. That is, there is no point in you trying to achieve the "25 mls in 25 seconds" type of pour with your auto, because you simply wont be able to jiggle the settings to get it. You will however, if you do a good job on the settings, acheive a faster flowing and mellow result in the cup (compared to same beans in conventional equipment). It will not be *bitter* if you get it right.

                    I suggest you stick with the one type of beans, read the booklet, and adjust the settings until you get the best coffee out of it that it can deliver. The best result, will be achieved by experimenting with different grind settings VS different dose settings to find the compromise between them that works best for your beans.

                    Hope that helps,
                    Attilio
                    very first CS site sponsor

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Talk_Coffee View Post
                      In which case you definitely have issues with your extraction!


                      It would appear that you are attempting to use a hydrangea to produce your coffee...
                      Hey Using Hydrangeas to extract coffee is all the rage with hipsters these days! Also, people in my office are now staring out me strangely after I laughed when reading your comment

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                      • #12
                        beanbay. whats a good strong coffee to buy?

                        I too laughed out loud at that one. Funnily enough, temple brewery next door to my work in Brunswick are straining there scarlet sour beer through hibiscus flowers. Maybe coffee is next.....plenty of hipsters in Brunswick!!!

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                        • #13
                          just takes under 30 secs to do expresso. i like to have strong coffee in a mug size. cappucino. I thinking maybe buying a roaster and buying raw beans from you? but not sure what roaster to get and what beans....

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                          • #14
                            Personally i would think your biggest impediment to getting the best shot at present is your machine. Get some good quality freshly roasted beans from some different roasters and see what you can get out of them with your machine before getting a roaster. If you are not happy with the coffe still, ditch the auto and get a grinder and machine that will do the job. Imo you will get better coffee out of the cheaper sunbeams/ breville combos than you will ever get out of an auto.

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                            • #15
                              Start at the beginning, buy a Behmor from Andy, he'll throw in some beans and away you go.
                              My son has just ben kitted up and he's flying, loving it.
                              Check out the Behmor thread on this site, read about all the happy people, look at their awesome 1st roasts!

                              As far as strong coffee goes.......... what is strong to you? Strong = acidic/bright?
                              Strong = rich and full bodied? Strong = big caffeine hit? There are beans and blends to suit all kinds of strong!

                              But like seamed says, compare the same beans through a good grinder and from a good machine, you might be more than surprised.
                              Roasting your own beans, although I would encourage it, won't solve your "express" o problem.
                              Last edited by chokkidog; 19 December 2012, 06:22 PM.

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