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  • Wrong amount of coffee could kill you.

    Another study another conclusion, toward the end of the article we read “The real message is that we need to have coffee in moderation.” what a surprise, pretty much a recipe for life, everything in moderation, even over consumption of water can prove fatal

    "Researchers from the WA Institute for Medical Research and the University of Western Australia were hoping to prove the cardiovascular benefits of coffee, but instead discovered it can worsen obesity and its related diseases."


    http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/news/n...1226650453552#
    Last edited by Javaphile; 27 May 2013, 03:45 PM. Reason: fix url formatting

  • #2
    Not enough coffee could cause death in the mornings, especially to people who would try to stop me.

    There are so many studies around and from what I've read everything can kill you. As you pointed out Yelta, "everything in moderation". I'm a bit over all the scare mongering of these so called experts though.

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    • #3
      I must say I would rather die from drinking to much coffee than die from worrying about everything that we should and shouldnt consume in this world. Sooner or later eating and drinking in moderation is going to be harmful to us....

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      • #4
        Cool, I don't have to worry about that til I'm 30 though.

        "Pre-30 you have the body God gave you, after that you have the body you deserve"

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        • #5
          Originally posted by dan77 View Post
          Not enough coffee could cause death in the mornings, especially to people who would try to stop me.
          This... Most definitely this...

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          • #6
            Originally posted by dan77 View Post
            Not enough coffee could cause death in the mornings, especially to people who would try to stop me.

            There are so many studies around and from what I've read everything can kill you. As you pointed out Yelta, "everything in moderation". I'm a bit over all the scare mongering of these so called experts though.
            Totally agree.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by dan77 View Post
              Not enough coffee could cause death in the mornings, especially to people who would try to stop me.

              There are so many studies around and from what I've read everything can kill you. As you pointed out Yelta, "everything in moderation". I'm a bit over all the scare mongering of these so called experts though.
              I'd say it's more like scaremongering by the media, who like to "creatively interpret" scientific results for a headline. The "expert" is just trying to disprove or prove the hypothesis.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by MrJack View Post
                I'd say it's more like scaremongering by the media, who like to "creatively interpret" scientific results for a headline. The "expert" is just trying to disprove or prove the hypothesis.
                I suspect you're right:
                The test subjects were mice - and you can bet that they were being dosed with Chlorogenic Acid - not enjoying (a very small cup of) coffee while they read the morning paper.
                While some interesting information about the metabolic effect of such dosing may be interesting, extrapolating that data to say that (for humans) one or two cups of coffee is okay, but four or five is not - is a great leap of faith.
                Some news reports also mentioned that the tests may have been to investigate some of the outrageous claims made about the supposed health benefits of green coffee beans or extract - the level of
                Chlorogenic Acid in roast coffee is only about 20% of that in green coffee, and chlorogenic acid is only one of many potentially bio-active ingredients in your daily brew.
                When the test subjects are humans, the available epidemiological data seems to suggest that the reverse is true - in particular that while the mice study suggested that negative effects cardiovascular health and obesity related disorders would be increased, coffee in moderate levels (whatever that may be for mice or people) seems to have the reverse effect - in general - and at the quantity most people seem to enjoy, coffee seems to be good for you.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Bobrob View Post
                  I suspect you're right:
                  The test subjects were mice - and you can bet that they were being dosed with Chlorogenic Acid - not enjoying (a very small cup of) coffee while they read the morning paper.
                  While some interesting information about the metabolic effect of such dosing may be interesting, extrapolating that data to say that (for humans) one or two cups of coffee is okay, but four or five is not - is a great leap of faith.
                  Some news reports also mentioned that the tests may have been to investigate some of the outrageous claims made about the supposed health benefits of green coffee beans or extract - the level of
                  Chlorogenic Acid in roast coffee is only about 20% of that in green coffee, and chlorogenic acid is only one of many potentially bio-active ingredients in your daily brew.
                  When the test subjects are humans, the available epidemiological data seems to suggest that the reverse is true - in particular that while the mice study suggested that negative effects cardiovascular health and obesity related disorders would be increased, coffee in moderate levels (whatever that may be for mice or people) seems to have the reverse effect - in general - and at the quantity most people seem to enjoy, coffee seems to be good for you.
                  Didja have a dictionary for breakfast Bobrob after reaching the last sentence I realised your saying exactly the same thing as most of us (in a round about way) everything in moderation.

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                  • #10
                    Is it just me or is that a fairly crappy-looking cup of coffee in the article? Even with the beans scattered around, it looks like instant.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Yelta View Post
                      Didja have a dictionary for breakfast Bobrob after reaching the last sentence I realised your saying exactly the same thing as most of us (in a round about way) everything in moderation.
                      On the contrary, I think he's saying the research in question doesn't say anything much about human coffee consumption. But since when did a reporter let the available facts get in the way of a strong conclusion?

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                      • #12
                        As a boring old bugger, I have lived my life based on the "everything in moderation" principle.
                        You can apply this to every aspect of your life from how much coffee you drink to how much time you spend working.
                        My corollary to this is "use your common sense" (and if you don't have any try to develop it)
                        The two principles have served me well.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by MrJack View Post
                          I'd say it's more like scaremongering by the media, who like to "creatively interpret" scientific results for a headline. The "expert" is just trying to disprove or prove the hypothesis.
                          Being lucky enough to have access to the actual publication, it certainly looks like scaremongering by the media. Essentially, they note that coffee has been known to help treat symptoms of metabolic syndrome, but since decaf coffee also helps they are testing whether it is the chlorogenic acid that is having a beneficial effect. They give the equivalent of 5 cups of coffee worth of the compound to mice that are on a high-fat diet, and see that this dosage does not help. The conclusion of the study is "This study suggests that CGA supplementation in a high-fat diet does not protect against features of the metabolic syndrome in diet-induced obese mice." It finishes with "Further work especially on human intervention studies is required to determine if coffee polyphenols are able to protect against metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes in humans."

                          Doesn't make any comment at all about how much coffee humans should drink, or even whether this same effect would be seen in humans! Hard to see how the paper got "Wrong amount of coffee could kill you" from this

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by papagoose View Post
                            Being lucky enough to have access to the actual publication, it certainly looks like scaremongering by the media. Essentially, they note that coffee has been known to help treat symptoms of metabolic syndrome, but since decaf coffee also helps they are testing whether it is the chlorogenic acid that is having a beneficial effect. They give the equivalent of 5 cups of coffee worth of the compound to mice that are on a high-fat diet, and see that this dosage does not help. The conclusion of the study is "This study suggests that CGA supplementation in a high-fat diet does not protect against features of the metabolic syndrome in diet-induced obese mice." It finishes with "Further work especially on human intervention studies is required to determine if coffee polyphenols are able to protect against metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes in humans."

                            Doesn't make any comment at all about how much coffee humans should drink, or even whether this same effect would be seen in humans! Hard to see how the paper got "Wrong amount of coffee could kill you" from this

                            Good post - thank you.

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                            • #15
                              I'm definitely cutting down on the amount of coffee I feed my obese mice!

                              Greg

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