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World’s first roast-grind-brew coffee machine

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  • World’s first roast-grind-brew coffee machine

    A mob on Kickstarter have planned what they describe as the worlds first all in one roaster/grinder/brewer, and with $130k of the $135k goal already raised with 26 more days to go, it looks certain to fund.
    World

    Couple of quick thoughts on the design.
    It isn't an espresso machine, it only makes filter coffee.
    Their roasting times seem stupidly quick. 3 to 4 minutes! That's quicker than even poppers usually go :/
    The design doesn't look like it'll be very accessible to clean, particularily thinking about their roasting unit, which then brings me to thinking that should there be a bean fire due to oil build up, it doesn't look like it'll handle that very well.
    I think you have to roast every time you make a coffee? Cycle time of 12 to 14 minutes probably is too bit long for those that just want a coffee without fuss.

  • #2
    .....I think you have to roast every time you make a coffee? Cycle time of 12 to 14 minutes probably is too bit long for those that just want a coffee without fuss.
    ..and every roaster i have spoken to says a fresh roast bean need to "rest" ( degas ?) for at least 48 hrs ( ideally 3-10 days ) before use. !
    ..EDIT .. but i see now they have taken that into consideration !.....and ignored it !
    .. Opinions differ. Of course, taste changes over time, but does it necessarily get better?
    brings me to thinking that should there be a bean fire due to oil build up, it doesn't look like it'll handle that very well.
    .... and chaff fires in roasters are all too common if they are not closely monitored.

    But ..what the heck you get a Roaster, grinder and a brewer + 3kg og beans ...all for < $300 ! Bargain.
    Last edited by blend52; 13th November 2013, 06:10 PM.

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    • #3
      ^^this and this.

      Awful idea, IMO. 3-4min roast and no rest? Enjoy your grass...

      I like my fruit fresh but that doesn't mean I want mangoes while they're green :P

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      • #4
        Good luck to them, but.....what a furphy of an argument. Somehow combining the roaster/grinder/brewer liberates coffee growers around the world to some extent greater than any other home roasting technology. And, unless space is the only issue, it beggars belief as to why you'd want to combine all three. Why not go the whole hog and have the existing machine built into the side of a live cow?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Barry O'Speedwagon View Post
          Good luck to them, but.....what a furphy of an argument. Somehow combining the roaster/grinder/brewer liberates coffee growers around the world to some extent greater than any other home roasting technology. And, unless space is the only issue, it beggars belief as to why you'd want to combine all three. Why not go the whole hog and have the existing machine built into the side of a live cow?
          ...and supply it with a small plot of land for the cow and the coffee plants: Close the circle so to speak...

          Good idea which sadly won't work if they tick their own boxes...

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          • #6
            Perfect opportunity for more options like,

            "Roast depth settings"
            1 min roast = Mean and green
            2 min roast = Medium Rare
            3 min roast = Well Done
            4 min toast = ???

            I had a similar idea once to create a wine machine where you put in fresh off the vine fair trade, organic, gluten free, low fat grapes.
            The machine will crush the grapes, separate the skin and pips then ferment the liquid for about 3 mins serving you with the freshest wine.

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            • #7
              I actually think it is an ok idea. It's clearly not for coffee snobs, but using beans that are just roasted would probably be better than using beans from the supermarket that are 8 weeks old. It could be a step up for many people.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by fg1972 View Post

                I had a similar idea once to create a wine machine where you put in fresh off the vine fair trade, organic, gluten free, low fat grapes.
                The machine will crush the grapes, separate the skin and pips then ferment the liquid for about 3 mins serving you with the freshest wine.
                You don't, by any chance, go by the name of 'Baldric' do you?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by gibberblot View Post
                  I actually think it is an ok idea. It's clearly not for coffee snobs, but using beans that are just roasted would probably be better than using beans from the supermarket that are 8 weeks old. It could be a step up for many people.
                  I'm not so sure... I can make palatable (if bland) coffee with supermarket beans. I've never managed to make a dead-fresh coffee that tasted ok bar Espresso WOW.

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                  • #10
                    The 'degasing' claims are awesome.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Dragunov21 View Post
                      I'm not so sure... I can make palatable (if bland) coffee with supermarket beans. I've never managed to make a dead-fresh coffee that tasted ok bar Espresso WOW.
                      I've never tasted dead fresh coffee... Maybe 1 day old at the earliest, which tasted very nice. What exactly is the flavour of a dead fresh coffee that is not so nice? I guess it would be quite oily?

                      I can make ok coffee with old beans, but it's ground on demand and extracted properly. I imagine these machines are aimed at people who use coffee bags or filter/plunger coffee made with 8-week old, pre-ground lavazza. The next step down is instant coffee....

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                      • #12
                        I generally find it to be grassy and lacking sweetness and desireable (smooth chocolatey, etc, in my case) flavours. That could just be the way I roast though; I find my roasts peak at 7-10 days.

                        I'm no great roaster and I'm not saying it can't be done (and I think the SCAA comp roasts are judged at ~24hrs old?) but if I can't do better in a Behmor than an automated 3-minute blast, there's something wrong :P

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                        • #13
                          I definitely agree that about a week is optimal.

                          I think the 3 minute roast is more to worry about than using the beans straight after the roast!

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by gibberblot View Post
                            I actually think it is an ok idea. It's clearly not for coffee snobs, but using beans that are just roasted would probably be better than using beans from the supermarket that are 8 weeks old. It could be a step up for many people.
                            very fair point. also i dont think many of these people know what it will actually taste like... until the machines hit their kitchens. all that said i think the overall outcome, sadly, is that it will still be better than 3 month-2 year old pregound lavazza and will still allow the machine to sell fairly well.

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                            • #15
                              New coffee roaster, grinder and brewer combo under devlopment

                              I was pointed to a new coffee related project on kickstarter. I've done a search on "bonverde" (the creator) and didn't find anything on the forums so hopefully this isn't old news.

                              This machine takes a small amount of green beans, roasts them to a level pre selected by the operator, grinds them then brews them to the desired strength. I haven't found much on the extraction method but it seems to be an automatic drip style.

                              Being a home roaster my first thought is that the beans are too fresh, although with roasters like the FZ-RR-700 who's owners report a great flavour straight out of the roaster.

                              They seem to have dealt with the smoke problem. I wonder what happens with the chaff?

                              The project can be found here

                              With 5 days left there's still a chance of picking one of the initial units up for $300 next year. I'd be keen to hear other's thoughts.

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