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Sant'Eustachio coffee technique

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  • Sant'Eustachio coffee technique

    Hello people,

    Just a quick question about the coffee that is delivered at Sant'Eustachio cafe. They have a popular coffee called gran caffè speciale which is served in a small coffee cup (bigger than espresso). It's strong and I think sweeter than normal though has a head on it. I then asked for a cafe espresso and this also had a head on it. Didn't ask them and couldn't see a thing getting done behind machine as they have steal plates hiding everything.

    Any ideas how they get that froth? Saying that it is more novelty than anything. If your lucky to be around when they are roasting with their wood oven roaster, the smell is to die for.

    Charles.

    Sant'Eustachio Il Caffè: il gran caffè speciale tostato a legna dal 1938 a Roma

  • #2
    Hi Charles,

    I am not familiar with that cafe, and probably have Buckley's chance of visiting myself.

    Are you able to post a photo of said drink?

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    • #3
      Hello Charles,

      The froth or what is commonly called crema occurs on the top of freshly made coffee made from freshly roasted and ground beans, brewed under pressure in an espresso machine. It is made from carbon dioxide bubbles covered with brewed coffee. The bubbles soon burst releasing the aroma and flavour of the coffee.

      It is no novelty as it indicates the quality and freshness of the coffee and skill of the barista.

      Low quality machines use dual walled filter baskets to produce fake crema but not the best flavour while using ancient supermarket coffee beans.

      Barry
      Last edited by Barry_Duncan; 12 May 2014, 01:00 PM.

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      • #4
        I have no idea and who can really say....maybe they add a little bit of lightly carbonated water to the shot and whisk vigorously?

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        • #5
          Sant'Estachio uses finely ground sugar in the bottom of the cup prior to the espresso pour. The froth is not Crema but a reaction to the sugar. Its a popular technique in the south of italy. I do not know the details but my father does, so I will ask him and report back.

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          • #6
            Have been in the south of Italy for the past week, drank a lot of coffee, however saw nothing that comes close to what you describe.

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            • #7
              Thank you Aaron, I think you are correct. It is a bit of a novelty and is quite mad how so much of this foam is produced from a shot. The coffee did have a slightly sweeter taste than most though I would not rate the taste any better than other coffee places. I brought back a kilo of their beans just because of their wood oven roasting. I knew there was no chance of getting a similar result but I do like the subtlety of the Italian espresso shot, just a little lighter than what we get here in Adelaide. Anyhow, thanks for your feedback.

              Think I will do some experimenting with my green beans now, some robusta blends on the way.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Aaron View Post
                Sant'Estachio uses finely ground sugar in the bottom of the cup prior to the espresso pour. The froth is not Crema but a reaction to the sugar. Its a popular technique in the south of italy. I do not know the details but my father does, so I will ask him and report back.
                Maybe its like adding sugar to a carbonated beverage - lets the CO2 escape quickly and fizz up?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by soviet View Post
                  I knew there was no chance of getting a similar result but I do like the subtlety of the Italian espresso shot, just a little lighter than what we get here in Adelaide.
                  Not sure just what your basing this statement on Soviet, The coffee scene in Adelaide has improved dramatically over the past 10 years, however it's certainly easier to consistently get a good strong shot in Italy than in Adelaide.
                  Good espresso is good espresso, regardless of where it's made.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Yelta View Post
                    Not sure just what your basing this statement on Soviet, The coffee scene in Adelaide has improved dramatically over the past 10 years, however it's certainly easier to consistently get a good strong shot in Italy than in Adelaide.
                    Good espresso is good espresso, regardless of where it's made.
                    That is the point with coffee in Rome, a good coffee is not a strong shot but a milder shot, slightly nutty and lighter in colour. It is not about how strong the coffee. The coffee in Adelaide is very good though it is all about the Arabica bean and a strong coffee that can be mixed well with their scalding milk. That is one thing I do not hear so much in Rome, the sound of frothing milk. Coffee should be drunk by coffee drinkers and not cats.

                    Sorry for my rant.

                    This is though a personal choice and everyone has their own preferences, not everyones taste buds are the same and the majority of people here in Adelaide drink milk coffee.

                    Charles.

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                    • #11
                      Pic of the Gran Cafe

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by soviet View Post
                        That is one thing I do not hear so much in Rome, the sound of frothing milk. Coffee should be drunk by coffee drinkers and not cats.

                        Sorry for my rant.

                        This is though a personal choice and everyone has their own preferences, not everyones taste buds are the same and the majority of people here in Adelaide drink milk coffee.

                        Charles.
                        Hmm ?.. you must be visiting different cafe's to me.
                        I have not compiled statistics, but i would suggest from my casual worldly observations that the vast majority of coffee is drunk with milk both in Au, and Europe, ..and even including the huge volume of Filter coffee in the USA !

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by blend52 View Post
                          Hmm ?.. you must be visiting different cafe's to me.
                          I have not compiled statistics, but i would suggest from my casual worldly observations that the vast majority of coffee is drunk with milk both in Au, and Europe, ..and even including the huge volume of Filter coffee in the USA !
                          Soviet was talking about Italy and not about Europe as a whole.... very different things. Having spent 9.5 years in Europe, I would definitely have to concur with Soviet. In Italy, the sound of the milk wand quickly fades away after 11 AM and Espresso shots are the order of the day from then on.

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                          • #14
                            Correct

                            Originally posted by Vinitasse View Post
                            Soviet was talking about Italy and not about Europe as a whole.... very different things. Having spent 9.5 years in Europe, I would definitely have to concur with Soviet. In Italy, the sound of the milk wand quickly fades away after 11 AM and Espresso shots are the order of the day from then on.
                            Yes this is correct. This last trip I returned from was a bit of a wine and coffee crawl across Europe and Italy though I only managed to get as low as Rome this year. Found a coffee shop in Venice (first visit) called Torrefazione Marchi. I love roasters in coffee shops, so gorgeous and the smell is amazing. Anyway thank you for everyone's feedback.
                            Attached Files

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                            • #15
                              In my Italian experience (4 weeks!) many italians, especially in the south, do have sugar in their espresso. It is often added automatically before the shot and if you wanted your shot without it, you had to specify. That might account for the additional sweetness.

                              Maybe they use powdered sugar rather than granulated?

                              BTW--when I make a doppio ristretto with my home roasted beans the extraction is usually 3/4 to 7/8 crema. Maybe the foam is just the crema from fresh beans. I noticed that most coffee bars in Italy buy their beans in 5 Kg bags rather than roast their own.

                              Greg

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