Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How hot should a long black be

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • How hot should a long black be

    As my title states, how hot should it be? I'm constantly getting burn your face off long blacks even when I think I've found a decent looking place when working in Brisbane cbd. If it's too hot will it kill the espresso and is there something they should be doing to avoid getting the water too hot?

  • #2
    Do you look like a "pensioner"?
    A lot of old buggers my age seem to want their coffee served at boiling point.
    I even had a house guest tell me she likes it really hot. I told her "There's the microwave - go crazy!"

    Comment


    • #3
      You know, I might open a can of worms here but this is what I do: flush group. Use manual toggle to fill cup with nice, clean water out of the HX (which is appx. 94° instead of screeching hot, burn your tongue numb water from the boiler).

      Then pull a shot on top of this cooler water; have an intrepid sip with a smile on your happy (unscalded) face.

      Comment


      • #4
        A barista / cafe owner mate put me onto adding a bit of cold water to boiled water when making a long black. That's how I've been doing it ever since. I don't know if there's a golden rule on temp, although I would imagine the 91-94 degree range Scott Rao recommends for brewing temps to be a reasonable guide. Temps above this may produce a bitter cup (as well as a scalding one!).

        Comment


        • #5
          Yeah I'm far off from being an old bugger just yet haha. I always have to leave my drink to cool for about 5min, even then it's still some times piping hot after that. I have enough trouble telling some places I'd like a short long black.

          Comment


          • #6
            Ha! I have given up on the "short long black" order - it doesn't seem to get communicated to the Barista.
            It's only going to work if you are a 'regular' on first name terms with the Barista, and he knows how you like it.
            The only time it's a problem for me is in cafes that use those big Americano cups so that even a double shot tastes watery.
            I confess to eyeballing their crockery and telling them which cup I want it in.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Rocky View Post
              Ha! I have given up on the "short long black" order - it doesn't seem to get communicated to the Barista.
              It's only going to work if you are a 'regular' on first name terms with the Barista, and he knows how you like it.
              The only time it's a problem for me is in cafes that use those big Americano cups so that even a double shot tastes watery.
              I confess to eyeballing their crockery and telling them which cup I want it in.
              Morning Rocky,

              I drink something similar to you, and, as you have done used to ask for a short long black "someone on CS informed me what I was ordering was a (Lungo) anyhow, what I order now is a long black > double shot > only top the cup half way with water, a bit clumsy but seems to work.

              We're obviously not on our own with this preference, perhaps there's a message there for Barista's and coffee shop owners, learn what a lungo is and how to make one.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Yelta View Post
                Morning Rocky,

                I drink something similar to you, and, as you have done used to ask for a short long black "someone on CS informed me what I was ordering was a (Lungo) anyhow, what I order now is a long black > double shot > only top the cup half way with water, a bit clumsy but seems to work.

                We're obviously not on our own with this preference, perhaps there's a message there for Barista's and coffee shop owners, learn what a lungo is and how to make one.
                A lungo is really an espresso extracted longer. eg if they're using 20g baskets, a lungo could be anywhere from 50g of beverage up.

                What you're really ordering there is half long black, or piccolo long black. I agree it is annoying to convey what you want to a barista who doesn't understand, but maybe we just need to say "just fill the cup with half the water you normally would."

                In terms of LB temp, there's no distinct temp like there is for milk coffee, but I say if I can't comfortably sip it when it arrives, it's too hot. For me that means anything above 80* is too hot.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I'm very conscious of trying to avoid being one of those 'hard to please' customers who wants to mess the Barista around with their nit-picking preferences.
                  I have always thought that there is sufficient variety in the 'traditional' menu of coffees to suit everyone, but of course individual cafes & Baristas also have their individual 'take' on a how a particular coffee will be made. Hence the watery Long Black in the 220ml cup.
                  Most people seem to want a bucket of coffee rather than something to sip and this is where the problem lies for me as I have a glass of water to quench my thirst and a coffee to sip.
                  I have always been of the opinion that a 160ml cup is about the right size for a double-shot Long Black and that an 'Americano' is a different order altogether.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I either constantly get an Americano instead of a long black or their cremas dissapear by the time I open the lid on a takeaway cup

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      As a barista mind reading is not one of my job requirments, when you order a steak you have to tell the waiter if you want it rare, medium or well done. Why should ordering a coffee be different, If you are not getting what you think you ordered then please next time ask for it the way you would like it made.

                      I am sure that it will take less time let them know your preference then it does to write a post on a forum about it. Until there is a global standard on drink sizes, drink names and how they are made there will allways be a variance. Please take the extra 10 seconds when ordering and let them know your preferance.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        unsure what it's supposed to be but for a normal long black I use a room temp (20'c) cup, pour in water from the hot water outlet (93'c) then drop the brew into that.
                        I find it's just right to be able to take good large sips immediately.

                        I don't bother ordering from my local barista, he tells me what I'm feeling like that day and then proceeds to make it..

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Goofie11 View Post
                          As a barista mind reading is not one of my job requirments, when you order a steak you have to tell the waiter if you want it rare, medium or well done. Why should ordering a coffee be different, If you are not getting what you think you ordered then please next time ask for it the way you would like it made.

                          I am sure that it will take less time let them know your preference then it does to write a post on a forum about it. Until there is a global standard on drink sizes, drink names and how they are made there will allways be a variance. Please take the extra 10 seconds when ordering and let them know your preferance.
                          I always explain what I want when I say a short long black. And I think it's common sense that someone doesn't want a boiling undrinkable beverage unless they ask for it

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Goofie11 View Post
                            As a barista mind reading is not one of my job requirments, when you order a steak you have to tell the waiter if you want it rare, medium or well done. Why should ordering a coffee be different, If you are not getting what you think you ordered then please next time ask for it the way you would like it made.

                            I am sure that it will take less time let them know your preference then it does to write a post on a forum about it. Until there is a global standard on drink sizes, drink names and how they are made there will allways be a variance. Please take the extra 10 seconds when ordering and let them know your preferance.
                            Perhaps mind reading is not one of your jobs, however it would serve any barista well to gain an understanding of what temperature range coffee drinks should be served at.

                            I suspect a customer who received severe burns from a super heated long black would have pretty good legal case against the barista who made it.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Yelta View Post
                              Perhaps mind reading is not one of your jobs, however it would serve any barista well to gain an understanding of what temperature range coffee drinks should be served at.

                              I suspect a customer who received severe burns from a super heated long black would have pretty good legal case against the barista who made it.
                              I have had customers ask for an extra hot long black...

                              Most baristas will flush the group head, fill up a cup from the boiler on the machine about 94-97 degrees than pull the shot into the cup.

                              If you don't want it so hot why not ask if they can put a couple of cubes of ice in the cup before they pull the shot. A couple of people at work drink their long blacks this way so they don't have to wait for it to cool down.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X