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  • Do you want Ethylene Glycol with that?

    Doctor Says Lover Gave Him Poisoned, 'Sweet' Coffee
    Reuters via Huffington Post. 20 Sept 2014


    (Reuters) - A Texas doctor, who prosecutors said was poisoned by an obsessed colleague and lover, testified on Friday in her criminal trial that the woman served him a sweet cup of coffee one morning even though he preferred his black.


    Dr. Ana Maria Gonzalez-Angulo, 43, an oncologist, is charged with aggravated assault of a family member, a charge that covers domestic violence in dating relationships, for allegedly spiking Dr. George Blumenschein's coffee in January 2013.


    "It was very, very sweet," Blumenschein testified.


    Blumenschein, 50, said he asked Gonzalez-Angulo why the coffee was sweet and she told him she had used Splenda, an artificial sweetener.


    "I found it odd that she put Splenda in the coffee, I like it black and she knows that," Blumenschein said.


    Prosecutors contend the coffee was laced with ethylene glycol, a colorless and odorless chemical commonly found in anti-freeze and science labs that has a sweet taste.


    The doctors, cancer researchers at University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, developed a romantic relationship as they worked long hours together in the lab, at her home and during frequent trips out of town, Blumenschein testified.


    "We were very good friends. I was close to her, I trusted her," Blumenschein said.


    Gonzalez-Angulo asked Blumenschein to try a coffee blend that morning, he said. When he complained about the taste, she told him to finish it because it was expensive, he said.


    Blumenschein said he felt very ill later in the day and was admitted to an emergency room 16 hours after drinking the coffee.


    He was diagnosed with central nervous system damage, cardiopulmonary complications and renal failure that night. He survived after undergoing dialysis, he said.


    A kidney specialist saw a hazy quality in Blumenschein's urine and alerted authorities after finding signs consistent with ethylene glycol poisoning.


    Blumenschein said Gonzalez-Angulo admitted, after the alleged poisoning, that she had access to ethylene glycol.


    Prosecutors contend she was obsessed with Blumenschein, with whom she had been in an affair for two years.


    An attorney for Gonzalez-Angulo has told jurors his client is innocent and that experts who have testified have done a little more than guesswork.


    Gonzalez-Angulo would face five to 99 years in prison if convicted. Blumenschein's testimony is expected to continue on Monday when the trial resumes.

    from:
    Doctor Says Lover Gave Him Poisoned, 'Sweet' Coffee

  • #2
    Crikey, makes you wonder about the thought processes (or lack of) of some of these nutters, and the perpetrator was also an educated medical person.

    Comment


    • #3
      Education is 100% unrelated to ethics.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by TampIt View Post
        Education is 100% unrelated to ethics.
        Perhaps Yelta was referring to the Code of Ethics all medical practicioners are taught and must adhere to... and I can assure you that the deliberate poisoning of someone certainly contravenes that ethical code.

        Comment


        • #5
          I honestly believed any thinking person wouldn't have a problem connecting my statement to the part of the Hippocratic oath which includes the promise "to abstain from doing harm".

          So much for assumptions.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Yelta View Post
            I honestly believed any thinking person wouldn't have a problem connecting my statement to the part of the Hippocratic oath which includes the promise "to abstain from doing harm".

            So much for assumptions.
            Americans prefer to eliminate: there's less litigation involved (ethics be damned).

            Addendum: I'm American. I know :P

            Comment


            • #7
              Hi all

              Doesn't the promise "to abstain from doing harm" specifically apply to the doctors patients? The victim of the alleged poisoning was a colleague and not a patient so logically the Hippocratic Oath does not apply. :-)

              Mike

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              • #8
                Without detracting from the vibe of the thing....you guys know that doctors (or graduating students) don't necessarily have to take an oath (Hyppocratic or otherwise) don't you?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Barry O'Speedwagon View Post
                  Without detracting from the vibe of the thing....you guys know that doctors (or graduating students) don't necessarily have to take an oath (Hyppocratic or otherwise) don't you?
                  Hmmmm... not so sure about that Barry. According to the Medical Board of Australia "Good medical practice: a code of conduct for doctors in Australia", which incorporates the AMA Code of Ethics and the WMA International Code of Medical Ethics, is a mandated professional standard and this code is issued under section 39 of the Health Practitioner Regulation National Law, and is in force in each state and territory here in Australia.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I didn't say that there weren't any externally imposed professional standards as per your post #4 (or indeed externally imposed laws). My point is that those codes / laws have force regardless of whether a doctor takes an oath.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      You are quite correct Barry.
                      See AHPRA Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency - Codes and Guidelines
                      Cheers
                      Dr Dave

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        "I found it odd that she put Splenda in the coffee. I like it black and she knows that."
                        This statement was the most surprising to me in this story but it has developed into an "ethical" discussion. Hmmm.
                        "I'll have a long black please."
                        Do you want sugar with that sir?
                        "No! I ordered a long black, not a ...."
                        Since when does a sweetener change a black coffee to a .....?
                        Perhaps the chemicals in a big enough serve of artificial sweetener could change the colour somewhat?

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