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I hate third wave coffee..., stop serving it to me please!!!

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  • I hate third wave coffee..., stop serving it to me please!!!

    It seems that all the caffes around my office in the CBD of Melbourne serve third wave !

    i can't stand it in my latte or as an espresso, especially as I don't take sugar.
    David Jones cafe in little Collins street (you know which one) is close to my office but I refuse to go there now. It's crap!!!!
    i want dark chocolate and cocoa flavours in my coffee not mouth puckering acidity, and thin body.
    I've stopped buying coffee and started using my plunger in the office.
    I'm tired of fads , and third wave is a fad!

    Third wave is fine in alternative preparation methods, but for espresso it's just wrong!
    That's my rant, it's a Friday so I think I allowed to rant!
    have a great weekend fellow coffeegeeks

  • #2
    Try Black Velvet Espresso, serves a great coffee IMHO.
    address i'm unsure I just know where it is

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    • #3
      Maybe I'm wrong here but my interpretation of 'Third wave' means to produce high quality coffee from production to the cup so not sure what there is to hate.

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      • #4
        You're referring to it's original ( American ) definition.

        The term 'Third Wave' was first coined by "Trish Rothgeb (formerly Skeie) of Wrecking Ball Coffee Roasters first wrote about the third wave of coffee in a November 2002 article[1] of The Flamekeeper, a newsletter of the Roaster's Guild, a trade guild of the Specialty Coffee Association of America. Nicholas Cho of Murky Coffee further defined the third wave of coffee in an often-referenced online article[2] and earlier in his interview in March 2005 on National Public Radio's All Things Considered program.[3] "

        Above quote from Wikipedia.

        It seems that some adopters of the 'third wave' philosophy also embraced a certain roasting style ......................

        hence the argument here in Australia.

        In America they were ( and still do in places ) roasting their coffee well into second crack, or even more. So, for them, stopping

        the roast before second crack was a complete revelation of what coffee could taste like.

        Some just stop the roast too soon........( for espresso).

        Coffee is in a continuous state of flux with no set rules, just periods of fashion and tangenital directions; some of which become eventual dead ends.
        Last edited by chokkidog; 6 March 2015, 12:15 PM.

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        • #5
          Had an espresso in town a couple of days ago, in an upmarket restaurant. The coffee was "traditional" espresso style, very well made and a very good cup. The difference between it and the "I wanna do it my way and choose to roast too lightly" brigade, is that the espresso presented to me was well balanced and had a good bottom end (body). I enjoyed it for what it was, and cough cough....it tasted like...."coffee". There was no pretence for it to taste like anything else.

          Anyone that is truly interested in coffee should be able to handle sampling and enjoying the different styles presented around and about.....AS LONG AS THEY CUP WELL, and one of the problems with so called 3rd wave in this country, is it seems to be the domain of snooty noses who are positioning themselves to take the high moral ground in coffee....and when all's said and done, its all about money.

          And while a small, nothwithstanding loud, group of coffee fascists arugue around and around about what is "good" coffee, the majority of coffee drinking consumers don't have a clue (and don't necessarily need to). All they want to know, is that their lartay tastes ok. The coffee and cafe industries are going through a lot of heartaches, to satisfy a minority of people. No doubt this improves the standard of quality for all, but many need to take a broader approach to all this.

          Whatever. Remember, it doesn't matter what it is AS LONG AS IT CUPS WELL. And good golly gosh, some people also need to remind themselves that excellent coffee can be had from the many good brand regular machines, not just the brands that have been appropriated by those wanting to take the high moral ground on equipment (as well as coffee) and reinvent the market to suit their own back pockets (demand / sale of equipment...note comment above...its all about money), even if it started out as something well intentioned.

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          • #6
            And that's it in a nutshell for me. When it becomes about ego and arrogance, the cup (and the paying public) always suffer.

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            • #7
              Interesting article: Sour Coffee Limits the Potential of Specialty Coffee | HoneyCo

              ..."Higher quality green coffee, a beautiful seed to cup story, and having your coffee prepared by highly skilled baristas is all for naught if the final product is simply not enjoyable."

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              • #8
                Well spotted Chris

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                • #9
                  A good idea would be for the roaster to supply the barista with a "bright batch" and a "darker batch", along with a couple of grinders, and offer the public a choice so that they the public can choose.That would solve all problems.

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                  • #10
                    Except that then a roaster with 50 grand worth of grinders on loan now has 100 grand worth out there.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by elbeano View Post
                      A good idea would be for the roaster to supply the barista with a "bright batch" and a "darker batch", along with a couple of grinders, and offer the public a choice so that they the public can choose.That would solve all problems.
                      I dont think its a matter of letting the public choose to solve the problem...

                      Prior to the introduction of third wave I don't feel it can be argued that coffee was served darker for the more espresso type and has been this way for longer that the third wave craze can remember. I say craze as I think third wave will only be a crazy that may eat its self from the inside out sooner or later. Im not saying im a great roaster as i still have alot to learn however i feel a good roaster can roast darker than the third wave coffee and still maintain many of these characteristic the bean has rather than losing them through roasting to dark.

                      Just my opinion.

                      Cheers

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                      • #12
                        Selective cafes to start with,and you will soon know how economical the trial is.Start with 10 and let the public decide,after all they the public supply the moolah in the first place.To lose one regular customer will take twenty five newbies.And whats a couple of grinders worth, based on the volume of the cafes? 1000kgs plus per annum x $27-$35kg verses a tax deductable grinder and a satisfied regular customer base. Im sure the customer would appreciate the option.The grinders can always be used again or sold on.

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                        • #13
                          I guess what im trying to say is, what ever trial is done, its only taking into consideration the now and not the future. My view personally is it wont last into the future to warrant a trial. I have trialled it at work with just who know not much about coffee but know what they like. Im back to roasting some where more on the verge pf second crack or somewhere in between FC and SC.

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                          • #14
                            This trial concept is a bit crazy.

                            Anyone who thinks that they can do better than the status quo, are free to enter the market themselves. If the market decides they are right (and they run their business well) then they might see success, and create a new "craze".

                            If they are not right... well they can always enjoy the company of the other 90% of the market producing crap coffee.

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                            • #15
                              Unfortunately the90% of the market who produce crap coffee seem to do quite well and they have a larger chunk of the coffee pie.

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