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Pale crema ..... Why?

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  • Pale crema ..... Why?

    This may be a basic question, but why am I struggling with getting a nice dark rich crema? Dosing is all good, coffee is fresh, if I grind finer then I restrict the flow, what's the best way to adjust to get a nice dark crema. I want to practice my latte art and is difficult with pale crema. Coffee tastes nice no problem there, shot time of 30 seconds all good too? Do some beans produce a better darker crema than others?

  • #2
    What brand and type of machine do you have?

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    • #3
      Sometimes low pump pressure and water temperature can be a factor.

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      • #4
        I have a VBM Jnr only couple months old, and Dimattina coffee ... bought fresh from their outlet at reservoir (Colombian light)

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        • #5
          Colombian 'light'?? .........Try a darker roast.

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          • #6
            hi mate, is the flow watery and pale? is it pale from the get go or does it get pale (and watery? soon after).
            could be channeling if its a watery flow too early on...

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            • #7
              It is pale from the get go, slightly darker for the first few seconds, flow looks watery, puck has a little water on it after the shot but not sloppy by any means ...... What are you thinking here?

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              • #8
                Pale crema ..... Why?

                Should be almost black at the start. You'll have to use a process of elimination. The easiest variable to change is the beans so try some different types and try blends rather than origins. Even grabbing something from the supermarket could be worth it to save on the cost of trying a few varieties. Other than that the next two things are definitely brew temp and pressure, probably in that order. Pale crema is what you get from auto machines or little pretend manuals machines. And that would usually be due to low brew temp, or pressure, or both. Good luck.

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