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  • A little advice required please...

    Hi All

    I'm new here although I have been lurking for quite a while.
    I starting lurking as I was getting bored of my pod machine and wanted to upgrade to a real machine,
    so after a lot of reading through the forums thought I'd start off with a second hand Sunbeam EM6910 and smartgrinder.......
    Unfortunately I'm now banned from making coffees in the morning beacause this thing could wake the dead!
    So, my question is, am I stuck with the pod machine or are there coffee machines out there that I can use at 5am without waking my entire family!

    Thanks
    Chris

  • #2
    Hello Chris,
    Sad to suggest you may need to (as I've had to do)move yourself out the back door.
    I've had to do exactly that,I'm quite comfortable with my set up ,by the backdoor with everything necessary,life is great again.
    Hopefully your back door area may offer some weather protection and some power/ running water etc,you won't look back.
    Always able to have your prepared coffees presented nicely indoors,without all the noise,people will love you again
    ,
    cheers,
    Mick.
    Attached Files
    Last edited by mulquemi; 17 October 2015, 09:10 AM. Reason: need to proof read!

    Comment


    • #3
      Hi Chris,

      Most espresso machines with rotary pumps are extremely quiet, though this comes with a price premium. You could also look at a lever machine as well. Not sure which grinders are quiet if that's a big problem as well.

      Cheers, Dave

      Comment


      • #4
        Take a look at this for a quiet alternative.
        http://coffeesnobs.com.au/sponsors/4...tml#post564900

        Comment


        • #5
          Hi Chris,
          My rotary machine (ECM from JetBlack Espresso) is extremely quiet, my new fridges cycle is louder than it, so I can vouch for their quietness, but also their price premium.. With a well mounted vibe pump you'll get relatively close to peace and quiet. However, as Dave says your grinder is probably the significant challenge. Lido or other hand grinders might be your best bet. The more sturdy looking they are, the quieter hand grinders tend to be.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Credry View Post
            Hi All

            I'm new here although I have been lurking for quite a while.
            I starting lurking as I was getting bored of my pod machine and wanted to upgrade to a real machine,
            so after a lot of reading through the forums thought I'd start off with a second hand Sunbeam EM6910 and smartgrinder.......
            Unfortunately I'm now banned from making coffees in the morning beacause this thing could wake the dead!
            So, my question is, am I stuck with the pod machine or are there coffee machines out there that I can use at 5am without waking my entire family!

            Thanks
            Chris
            G'day Chris

            Only the manual lever machines are truly quiet and they are certainly not for newbies to espresso machines (look up portafilter sneezes). They are also expensive.

            I actually "upgraded" from a 6910 to a 7000 to get some domestic harmony - it is a lot quieter than any sub $2000 "true espresso machine" I know. The "upgraded" is in quotes because it is quieter, has a milk thermometer (of dubious accuracy, however it is consistent) and is easier to pull an average shot & froth "average microfoam". It also is lower maintenance than a 6910 because the whole thing stays cleaner (cleanup every 750g, not 250g of coffee). Worth $100 more for that lot? 50-50. For those beyond P plates, the older 6910s pull an equal or better shot and make better microfoam - albeit by requiring more experience and/or skill. The 7000 is still the quietest "true espresso machine" I know for a domestic setting. I also have a 2 group La Pav commercial that generates the trumps of doom and wakes the dead. It was banned outright whilst the SWMBO is home, indoors or out!

            The other option - a friend put his outside (to get the room) and bought an old acoustic printer hood for about $20 at an auction. Perhaps a little creative sound damping could work in your case.

            TampIt

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by TampIt View Post
              G'day Chris

              Only the manual lever machines are truly quiet and they are certainly not for newbies to espresso machines (look up portafilter sneezes). They are also expensive.


              TampIt
              Before Ernesto Valence of Faema fame invented the e61, and after Achille Gaggia invented the spring piston lever, in 1945, lever machines ruled.

              If you were new to coffee making on a machine, either domestically or commercially, prior to 1961 you had to learn on a lever, period.

              If they could do it then you can do it now.

              Why tell anyone that they can't?

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by chokkidog View Post
                If they could do it then you can do it now.

                Why tell anyone that they can't?
                Yes agreed chokki. Love it when people who have no idea of the potential of others place themselves in the business of telling strangers what they can and can't do and stuff like there is only one true home grinder. Uttter boolsheet yet again, but what more would you expect?

                We have a number of clients who have gone from nothing straight to spring lever machines. Try telling them they can't.

                To address the question asked by the OP. Yes- Sunbeam = jackhammer. Anything non appliance machine (and some of the better appliances) will be way quieter. Ear muffs to make a coffee = dealbreaker!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by chokkidog View Post
                  Before Ernesto Valence of Faema fame invented the e61, and after Achille Gaggia invented the spring piston lever, in 1945, lever machines ruled.

                  If you were new to coffee making on a machine, either domestically or commercially, prior to 1961 you had to learn on a lever, period.

                  If they could do it then you can do it now.

                  Why tell anyone that they can't?
                  Hey chokkidog

                  I did not say you cannot, merely that it is not newbie friendly. The domestic ones are also expensive and only suitable for a limited number of cups. These days there are a lot of far more newbie friendly alternatives (like a 6910, Gaggia Classic, Sylvia etc) which do not bite the unwary. As long as it is a true espresso machine (i.e. unpressurised baskets) then getting the experience on board in a relatively painless manner is usually a better option.

                  I see this site as encouraging newbies up to speed with minimal pain as opposed to raising the bar unnecessarily for them.

                  Traditionally, newbies trashed astonishing amounts of (hopefully unwanted & unloved) coffee to get a feel for the domestic's manual lever mechanism before they could get anything drinkable. Having lived with a (sadly missed, divorce casualty) manual lever Electra for decades, I initially went through a kilo or two - and I already had a number of commercial machines "tap dancing at will". That includes two commercial levers which were built like a Mack truck and were actually easier than most semi-autos. Mind you, they had no feel or temperature surfing issues, just use the same lever positions every time and count to thirty. One other guy I know gave up after circa 20 kilos and the fourth p/f sneeze - yeah, I know some can, some can't.

                  After they are hooked on a decent cuppa, upgradeitis will take over regardless of what anyone else says or does anyway.

                  Enjoy your cuppa, all is optional.

                  TampIt

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Talk_Coffee View Post
                    Yes agreed chokki. Love it when people who have no idea of the potential of others place themselves in the business of telling strangers what they can and can't do and stuff like there is only one true home grinder. Uttter boolsheet yet again, but what more would you expect?

                    We have a number of clients who have gone from nothing straight to spring lever machines. Try telling them they can't.

                    To address the question asked by the OP. Yes- Sunbeam = jackhammer. Anything non appliance machine (and some of the better appliances) will be way quieter. Ear muffs to make a coffee = dealbreaker!
                    No one is trying to tell them (or you) anything. You can learn to drive in a model A Ford or a Stanley Steamer if you want, however most people would prefer an easier option.

                    Noise: Then try my La Pav if you reckon the SB 6910 is noisy. Most poorly engineered Italian machines are noisier - and that is a very long queue.

                    FYI, just to inject a little truth into the thread again: 6910s vary massively in noise levels, some are fairly quiet, others not so much.

                    Always great to see you rubbish anything I write. Gives my mates a giggle and shows who is full of "Uttter boolsheet"... and illiteracy comes at no extra cost.

                    TampIt
                    Last edited by TampIt; 17 October 2015, 04:07 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Yes. We all love a piano which plays only two notes.

                      We'll wait for something of worth- not about "the only grinder on the market" and appliance machines.

                      A search of history will reveal the relevant worth and credibility of the contributions of any member.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by TampIt View Post

                        Traditionally, newbies trashed astonishing amounts of (hopefully unwanted & unloved) coffee to get a feel for the domestic's manual lever mechanism before they could get anything drinkable. Having lived with a (sadly missed, divorce casualty) manual lever Electra for decades, I initially went through a kilo or two - and I already had a number of commercial machines "tap dancing at will". That includes two commercial levers which were built like a Mack truck and were actually easier than most semi-autos. Mind you, they had no feel or temperature surfing issues, just use the same lever positions every time and count to thirty. One other guy I know gave up after circa 20 kilos and the fourth p/f sneeze - yeah, I know some can, some can't.
                        Traditionally, this must be a WA thing, because over on the East coast, it don't happen.

                        "just use the same lever positions every time and count to thirty"

                        I have a commercial lever, and have no clue as to what you are talking about in this context.
                        A lever is dead simple to use. You lock the group handle in after dosing and tamping. You lower the lever to start pre infusion. You then raise the lever (after allowing "x" seconds of pre infusion), and get a perfect espresso. Time of pre infusion varies on the roast depth and age of beans, and can no doubt lead to hours of conjecture.

                        In the examples below, you can see the simplicity involved:

                        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ir68iy3IuQI

                        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dXJc2bzVX3I

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Bosco_Lever View Post
                          In the examples below, you can see the simplicity involved:

                          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ir68iy3IuQI

                          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dXJc2bzVX3I
                          This is really cool!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Cant beat the aeropress/v60/chemex and a Hario/Porlex hand grinder! Its my go to when the family are all tucked away in bed.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Bosco_Lever View Post
                              Traditionally, this must be a WA thing, because over on the East coast, it don't happen.

                              "just use the same lever positions every time and count to thirty"

                              I have a commercial lever, and have no clue as to what you are talking about in this context.
                              A lever is dead simple to use. You lock the group handle in after dosing and tamping. You lower the lever to start pre infusion. You then raise the lever (after allowing "x" seconds of pre infusion), and get a perfect espresso. Time of pre infusion varies on the roast depth and age of beans, and can no doubt lead to hours of conjecture.

                              In the examples below, you can see the simplicity involved:

                              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ir68iy3IuQI

                              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dXJc2bzVX3I
                              To be fair that's a real professional operating that machine. A better example of what an amateur can achieve would be this video. Plus you can hear the silence. https://youtu.be/2GX6r2taypQ

                              Comment

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