Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

BBC: Is there a serious problem with coffee capsules?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • BBC: Is there a serious problem with coffee capsules?

    The German city of Hamburg has banned coffee pods from state-run buildings as part of an environmental drive to reduce waste. Should others follow suit, asks Chris Stokel-Walker...


    ...As part of a guide to green procurement, the German city of Hamburg last month introduced a ban on buying "certain polluting products or product components" with council money. The ban includes specific terms for "equipment for hot drinks in which portion packaging is used" - specifically singling out the "Kaffeekapselmaschine", or coffee capsule machine, which accounts for one in eight coffees sold in Germany.

    "These portion packs cause unnecessary resource consumption and waste generation, and often contain polluting aluminium," the report says...


    ...There are other issues. "It's 6g of coffee in 3g of packaging," says Dube. "We in Hamburg thought that these shouldn't be bought with taxpayers' money."...


    ...It's not just German politicians who feel this way. One in 10 Britons polled by Harris Interactive for The Grocer, a supermarket trade magazine, said that they believed "coffee pods are very bad for the environment." At the same time, 22% of those asked said they owned a machine...



    ...John Sylvan, the inventor of the K-cup single-serving coffee pod, America's biggest selling capsule, last year foreswore his invention. "I feel bad sometimes that I ever did it," he told one journalist.

    Others share his concern. "We're doing our best in society to reduce greenhouse emissions, and in many ways we're making progress, but in certain ways we're going back 20 or 30 years," says Doug Leblanc, a coffee shop owner from Nova Scotia, Canada. "Making coffee in plastic pods that go in the garbage? There are other ways to make coffee that are better and have less impact on the environment."

    Leblanc is one of the people behind the Kill the K-cup campaign. With a local film studio, the campaign produced a spoof monster movie last year in which a giant made of plastic coffee pods runs roughshod over a city.



    Java "Full article here" phile
    Toys! I must have new toys!!!

  • #2
    Hello Javaphile,
    Doe's that include users of tissue covered ESE (easy serve espresso) pod's as distinct from coffee pod's?
    Hope not!
    Cheers,
    Mick.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by mulquemi View Post
      Doe's that include users of tissue covered ESE (easy serve espresso) pod's as distinct from coffee pod's?
      Hope not!
      Cheers,
      Mick.
      Probably should if it doesn't. The only real difference with them is that there's tissue around the stale rubbish coffee as well. There is less plastic, but they're packaged in foil or plasticised foil.
      Last edited by TC; 20 February 2016, 06:39 PM. Reason: more info

      Comment


      • #4
        I've been wondering the same thing about the ESE pods. Less packaging, but still wrapped in foil/plastic. But if it comes down to waste, there would be less going to landfill than capsules.

        If there was more of a commitment to recycling the used capsules, and consumers are commited to recycling them, then that would be a simple fix to a complex situation.

        The reduction of environmental impact should start at the beginning, not at the end!


        Still, we can't blame Nestlé when consumers are happly supporting a system that is not environmentally sound...

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by javaNOTcode View Post
          Still, we can't blame Nestlé when consumers are happly supporting a system that is not environmentally sound...
          Sure we can. It's done every day in regards to pollution control. An example would be when the petrol producers were held to account for having lead in their products and were forced to remove it. Companies are held to task every day for the pollution they/their products put into the environment.

          If people/consumers always did the right/smart thing there would be no need for any laws.


          Java "Ethical what?" phile
          Toys! I must have new toys!!!

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Javaphile View Post
            Sure we can. It's done every day in regards to pollution control. An example would be when the petrol producers were held to account for having lead in their products and were forced to remove it. Companies are held to task every day for the pollution they/their products put into the environment.

            If people/consumers always did the right/smart thing there would be no need for any laws.


            Java "Ethical what?" phile
            Spot on Java.

            Comment

            Working...
            X