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  • Water filtration where plumb in isn't possible

    Hear a lot about the C150 as a standard for plumb in. What about for situations where plumb in isn't possible? Is there a system such as a water jug based filtration system that the site sponsors 'endorse' as being suitable for minimising scale build up in tank based espresso machines?

  • #2
    I bought a C150 system which I run the filtered water through a 3 way mixer tap (replacement of the old mixer) into a jug and then into the water tank of my machine. You could also mount a separate filter tap on or near you sink if you're able to.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Melbroaster View Post
      Hear a lot about the C150 as a standard for plumb in. What about for situations where plumb in isn't possible? Is there a system such as a water jug based filtration system that the site sponsors 'endorse' as being suitable for minimising scale build up in tank based espresso machines?
      Aqua Pro benchtop filtration system | Talk Coffee

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      • #4
        I have this system at home. Attached to the tap in the kitchen sink, it happily sits out of the way. Absolutely worth it IMO.

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        • #5
          Thanks for the advice. I think something like the Aqua Pro looks good if I do need to upgrade. Had a test done at a local pool chemical supplier on the current drinking water filter that we had for a while as an add-on to the kitchen tap.

          Does anyone know enough about this to recommend whether this water is suitable for stainless steel boilers (Linea Mini) ? Are enough data points captured?

          TDS: 39
          Free Chlorine: 0
          Cyanuric Acid: 0
          Total Chlorine: 0
          PH: 6.9
          Total Alkalinity: 10
          Calcium Hardness: 20
          Phosphate: 0

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          • #6
            Think I would prefer to use a specialist coffee-machine water filter supplier like several of our Site Sponsors for instance. Those numbers are a bit vague to be honest and I think it would definitely be cost effective given the quality of machine you're trying to protect...

            Mal.

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            • #7
              I bought the C150 kit from jetblack that comes with a tap, so no plumb in directly to machine. If you're handy you can install it yourself, I just drilled a hole in one of the corners of my sink for the tap to go in, it looks pretty nice. I just fill a jug and pour that into the tank.

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              • #8
                Water filtration is sooo dodgy. Ask the shop if they can verify any claims. I can almost guarantee they can't.

                After much searching I found Doulton water filters, UK made for 100 years, and independently certified by the NSF.

                I got a under the counter job, with a cheap 5 micron first stage and a commercial link removed per Site Posting Policy 0.2 micron Doulton ceramic to do the real filtering.
                Last edited by Javaphile; 10 June 2016, 11:11 AM. Reason: Commericial link(s) removed

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Melbroaster View Post
                  Does anyone know enough about this to recommend whether this water is suitable for stainless steel boilers (Linea Mini)
                  You'll be fine.... Just use something to keep the muck out. Even a Brita will suffice with your numbers.

                  Originally posted by MrFreddofrog View Post
                  Water filtration is sooo dodgy
                  Your 0.2 micron does absolutely nothing to soften water. Whilst it will deliver good drinking water, it will not make a zac of difference in terms of scale deposition in an espresso machine unless your primary filter is a softening one.

                  In most areas of Perth, you will ultimately be in big trouble. Let's not further propagate misinformation when it comes to filtration for espresso machines.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by MrFreddofrog View Post
                    I got a under the counter job, with a cheap 5 micron first stage and a 0.2 micron Doulton ceramic to do the real filtering.
                    As far as I know it's opposite:


                    Stage 1: Ceramic filter (Pre-Filter):
                    It is made from Sterasyl Microfilter which provides self-sterilising properties.
                    The first stage of this filtration process performs two fundamental functions.
                    First, to remove bacteria and unwanted contaminants and the second is to protect the carbon post filter.


                    Stage 2: Carbon Block (Post Filter):
                    At this second stage in the filtration process, bad odour and taste are removed
                    as well as chlorine and heavy metals.


                    And finally water softener if required.
                    I'm using small internal one which should be enough for Melbourne water.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Talk_Coffee View Post
                      You'll be fine.... Just use something to keep the muck out. Even a Brita will suffice with your numbers.



                      Your 0.2 micron does absolutely nothing to soften water. Whilst it will deliver good drinking water, it will not make a zac of difference in terms of scale deposition in an espresso machine unless your primary filter is a softening one.

                      In most areas of Perth, you will ultimately be in big trouble. Let's not further propagate misinformation when it comes to filtration for espresso machines.
                      No misinformation at all. I made no claim about its ability to soften water.

                      The point of the post was to alert the OP to all the unsubstantiated claims made by water filter companies.

                      And I went one step further and recommended a reputable company to save him all the trouble I had in trying to find one. While I have no need to soften my water I'd hazard a guess Doulton have something in their product range that will do the job.

                      Edit: If a company claims its product softens water, the obvious question I'd be asking is by how much? If they can't provide the data to back up their claims, go elsewhere, there are companies that can.

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                      • #12
                        True. I meant I have a separate 5 micro filter before the Doulton. Reduces the load on the Doulton and 5 micron filters are as cheap as chips. Iirc the company even threw one in for free that's how cheap they are.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by MrFreddofrog View Post
                          True. I meant I have a separate 5 micro filter before the Doulton. Reduces the load on the Doulton and 5 micron filters are as cheap as chips. Iirc the company even threw one in for free that's how cheap they are.
                          Unless it's a softening filter, it still doesn't do a zac for hardness. Even if it does, it may still be unsuitable.

                          Drinking water filters are not suitable for espresso machines in areas where TH and/or TDS are high. I suggest you have a read over Filtration | Talk Coffee and use the information as applicable to your specific circumstances. For much of Perth, the only acceptable solutions are RO, remineralised RO or filtered bottled.

                          Choose to ignore it? Not my problem....

                          Perth- where espresso machines go to die...Said it before, say it again...

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Talk_Coffee View Post
                            Unless it's a softening filter, it still doesn't do a zac for hardness. Even if it does, it may still be unsuitable.

                            Drinking water filters are not suitable for espresso machines in areas where TH and/or TDS are high. I suggest you have a read over Filtration | Talk Coffee and use the information as applicable to your specific circumstances. For much of Perth, the only acceptable solutions are RO, remineralised RO or filtered bottled.

                            Choose to ignore it? Not my problem....

                            Perth- where espresso machines go to die...Said it before, say it again...
                            This is concerning for me. I am in Perth and have a 3 stage filtration system called "hi flow" it does have softening according to the tech sheet, however I haven't had my water tested?

                            Where can I have my water tested? as I would hate to kill my machine prematurely due to poor water, as I thought I had taken the necessary precautions with filtration already.

                            My kettle is six years old an has been using the filtered water since day 1 and there is no scale at all inside it. Is this indicative of good water or not really?

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Talk_Coffee View Post
                              Unless it's a softening filter, it still doesn't do a zac for hardness. Even if it does, it may still be unsuitable.

                              Drinking water filters are not suitable for espresso machines in areas where TH and/or TDS are high. I suggest you have a read over Filtration | Talk Coffee and use the information as applicable to your specific circumstances. For much of Perth, the only acceptable solutions are RO, remineralised RO or filtered bottled.

                              Choose to ignore it? Not my problem....

                              Perth- where espresso machines go to die...Said it before, say it again...
                              You really should stop spreading misinformation and unhelpful comments such as "Perth- where espresso machines go to die..." If you care to be educated you should read the The Water Corps annual water quality reports and see Perth water hardness is actually very variable and localised depending on your source reservoir. (My water hardness is fine, but thanks for asking)

                              Or you can choose to ignore my advice and continue to make sweeping generalisations and use fear tactics to con people into buying equipment they may not actually need. But as you say, not my problem.

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