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Acquiring a Taste for Black Coffee

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  • Acquiring a Taste for Black Coffee

    Hi all. I have been drinking cafe lattes and flat whites for many years, but I'd like to acquire a taste for black coffee - mostly for practical reasons (lower calories and not having to keep milk in the fridge). I've tried a couple of times over the years but have had trouble getting past the bitterness.

    I'm determined to give it a proper go this time, but where's the best place to start? Long blacks? Macchiato? Piccolo latte and easing into a short black?

  • #2
    I've come across many people who don't drink coffee without milk because of the bitterness however most of those people had never had a proper espresso instead they got caught up in the trendy hype of coffee with pictures in the milk with weird and wonderful names, shapes and sizes. I've managed to convert a few milk only people after I'd made them a good old fashioned espresso. To answer your question, I think a short macchiatto with just a dash of milk might be a good way to ease into it but more importantly if you're not making it yourself, you'd need to find somewhere or someone who knows how to extract an espresso properly as I believe this drink is the hardest one to master as it cannot hide any defects behind the milk. Good luck, I'm sure you'll know what I mean once you taste that perfect cup of liquid gold.
    PS,
    Ask for it as espresso, short black doesn't do it justice.
    Last edited by fg1972; 24 September 2016, 03:57 PM.

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    • #3
      Which coffee related equipment do you own?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Melbroaster View Post
        Which coffee related equipment do you own?
        Just a basic grinder and moka pot. To be honest I make pretty ordinary coffee, and since I don't drink every day I mostly leave it to the professionals.

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        • #5
          Are you looking to buy new equipment or make drinks with existing? If buying what's the budget?

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          • #6
            I think that a great way to go is to get a relatively cheap hand grinder and a Hario V60 and do pour over. There is little to no bitterness if you have good filter roast beans.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Melbroaster View Post
              Are you looking to buy new equipment or make drinks with existing? If buying what's the budget?
              I'm not looking into developing a new hobby, I just want to drink the stuff.

              Sounds like macchiato is the way to go, thanks.

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              • #8
                ROFL. Try the Whirlpool forum next time..... 😂

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                • #9
                  Why? I got an answer in a few hours. Good result as far as I'm concerned.

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                  • #10
                    Pourover coffees will be your best bet. If your local cafe sells batch brewed coffee, grab a cup and see what you think. Should be cheaper than the average coffee too.

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                    • #11
                      Another thought, might be to try a Syphon Brewer/Vacuum Pot to brew your black coffee.
                      It's by far and away my preferred brew method for drinking black coffee; makes for a sweet, rich brew... Yum

                      Mal.

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                      • #12
                        The old moka pot is also capable of producing a nice brew to drink black , just need to know how to get the best out of it. A few suggestions that may help you,
                        Ensure beans are fresh (must)
                        Not too much water in the base, don't fill past the blow off valve.
                        Grind fine and pack it in to the filter well to ensure the coffee doesn't come out quickly and runny. I like to load it up with fine grounds to a point where the coffee comes out thick and slowly usually with a light head of crema. You may need a few runs at getting the grind and dose right for your liking.
                        As the coffee starts coming up, switch off the heat before the coffee is nearly finished extracting to prevent it over cooking. It's a good idea to dunk the pot in some shallow cold water in the sink straight after taking it off the stove.
                        Just before pouring, a little stir in the top of the pot to make sure you're pouring consistent coffee.
                        Hope this helps.

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                        • #13
                          Brazen see beanbay

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                          • #14
                            I am like you, milk based coffees all the time, but have recently been swayed to pour overs.. Took a few times to get used to it, but permitting its done right, its quite nice.

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