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Is WDT Right for You? Discussion Thread

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  • Is WDT Right for You? Discussion Thread

    From Home Barista:

    Although I believe the WDT can improve everyone's espresso pours, some will clearly benefit more than others from this technique. Stirring the grounds only affects dose and distribution, and will not cure problems associated with stale beans, poor grind, incorrect brew temperature, and so on. It is less likely to help those who:
    • work in a high volume coffee establishment, where commercial grinders function well and speed is essential;
    • already have achieved a high degree of skill and consistency in their espresso extractions by developing their own methods to overcome grinder design inadequacies;
    • have a grinder (such as the Versalab M3) that distributes grounds uniformly;
    • have especially forgiving brewing equipment, such as espresso machines with the preinfusing E61 group.

    People who will likely benefit most from the WDT include those who:
    • see obvious clumping and uneven distribution from their grinder;
    • have less forgiving espresso brewing equipment;
    • see uneven espresso extractions from their bottomless portafilters;
    • are starting on their journey into the world of espresso.

  • #2
    Originally posted by flashpixx View Post
    Stirring the grounds only affects dose and distribution
    If your stirring is affecting your dose you should probably use less vigorous motions

    Comment


    • #3
      Never used any of the so-called improvements to techniques such as this...
      Never found the need at any time.

      Simple and quick - grind, dose, distribute, tamp, lock-in and pull the shot then stop it at one's preference.
      No need for additional complexity...

      Mal.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Dimal View Post
        Never used any of the so-called improvements to techniques such as this...
        Never found the need at any time.

        Simple and quick - grind, dose, distribute, tamp, lock-in and pull the shot then stop it at one's preference.
        No need for additional complexity...

        Mal.

        That's it in a nutshell.

        Comment


        • #5
          There's hardly a high barrier to entry in straightening out a paperclip and chopping up a yoghurt container or a paper cup, so I think people should just try for themselves; there's not much to loose.

          Do you need it? Give yourself a consistency test; see if you can make five or ten shots in a row and end up within a grams and two or three seconds time on each of them. Write it down. If you can pass that test, I don't know if that means that you won't benefit from WDT, but if the test reveals a lack of consistency, then you can probably improve something.

          Comment


          • #6
            Yeah, fair enough Luca but I think it would be a lot better for people striking trouble with consistency, to either do a basic barista course from a reputable provider or take on some lessons from a reputable barista who can make time for them.

            Never been in favour of adding additional and mostly redundant steps into what should be for most, a very simple routine to match the process...

            Mal.

            Comment


            • #7
              Whatever Floats Your Crema.

              If simplicity is your priority, get rid of your coffee gear and buy a jar of Nescafé. Nothing simple about making a decent cup of coffee. Why would the gurus on this forum be advocating barista courses if it was simple?

              Ps still, can't see any point to making it more complicated than it needs to be.

              Comment


              • #8
                Well, it is easy...

                Once you have necessary knowledge and skills under your belt and if you live in or near a big city, then there is no excuse not to attend a reputable basic barista course.

                I learnt from a guy (barista) on my way through Cairns when ever I stopped over for a few days on my way to/from somewhere else. He produced some of the best espresso I had ever experienced and we got to know each other through my frequent visits when, after a while during quiet periods (not many of those), he let me loose on the machine and explained everything that was going on. Those lessons stuck and when I eventually had enough green stuff to buy our first real espresso machine/grinder combo, it didn't take long to apply those lessons to our own setup and enjoy some great coffee, from then on.

                Most basic barista courses are not that expensive either and when you consider the significant benefits, it's a wonder these aren't part of every machine/grinder package sold.

                Anyway, end of my little rant...

                Mal.

                Comment


                • #9
                  And it is pretty simple , if you are capable of basic analytical thinking and have the type of mind that understands the way things work.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Dimal View Post
                    Well, it is easy...

                    Once you have necessary knowledge and skills under your belt...
                    Just like riding a bike, ice skating, swimming, juggling, etc, etc - easy when you know how.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Dimal View Post
                      Well, it is easy...

                      Once you have necessary knowledge and skills under your belt and if you live in or near a big city, then there is no excuse not to attend a reputable basic barista course.

                      I learnt from a guy (barista) on my way through Cairns when ever I stopped over for a few days on my way to/from somewhere else. He produced some of the best espresso I had ever experienced and we got to know each other through my frequent visits when, after a while during quiet periods (not many of those), he let me loose on the machine and explained everything that was going on. Those lessons stuck and when I eventually had enough green stuff to buy our first real espresso machine/grinder combo, it didn't take long to apply those lessons to our own setup and enjoy some great coffee, from then on.

                      Most basic barista courses are not that expensive either and when you consider the significant benefits, it's a wonder these aren't part of every machine/grinder package sold.

                      Anyway, end of my little rant...

                      Mal.
                      Do have some sympathy for those who live the country, 4hrs from a big city. 8hr return drive or the expense of a nights accommodation.

                      CS is a great help and yes barista courses give you a huge leap forward. Would never go back to the rat race of Melbourne but it would be nice to have the choice of good baristas and the occasional helpful hint. There might be some benefit of living in the city???

                      No give me space and tranquillity!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Haha...

                        No going back to the city for us either.

                        Mal.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Dimal View Post

                          No going back to the city for us either.

                          Mal.
                          Amen to that.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Meggs8 View Post
                            Do have some sympathy for those who live the country, 4hrs from a big city. 8hr return drive or the expense of a nights accommodation.
                            TAFE offer barista training courses.

                            Off Topic. Grew up in Bairnsdale / Nicholson. Spent waay too much time at the hotel in the late '70's. Was the only place that attracted anything like a band worth watching. Remember the ferry across to Raymond Island (still going?), mosquitoes that you saddle and ride,

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Meggs8 View Post
                              Do have some sympathy for those who live the country, 4hrs from a big city. 8hr return drive or the expense of a nights accommodation.
                              Not trying to engage in a pi**ing contest, but, I bought my first espresso Machine whilst living in Andamooka SA, 700 km from the nearest barista.

                              Learning involved a bit of trial and error, not a big deal though.

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