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  • Quick Question

    I have a question, and it probably is a bit silly, : but does it work out more ecconomic buying coffee beans to grind then buying good quality preground coffee....
    i understand the need for a good grinder and good quality coffee....
    some friends were discussing the value for $ of buying for eg a 250gr pack of beans for grinding as opposed to a 250gr pack of preground...
    i was a bit confused, just kept sipping on my flat white.... ;D
    thanks for your help

  • #2
    Re: Quick Question

    most roasters dont charge extra for grinding your beans
    but
    for those with a nose for coffee
    its all in the cup

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Quick Question

      i guess my question is how much ground coffee would come from a 250gr pack of beans...

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Quick Question

        250 grams.

        Why do you think there could be a different answer?

        What weighs more 1 kg of gold or 1kg of feathers?


        More detail please cuppa.
        What sort of arguments were your friends coming up with?

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Quick Question

          Originally posted by cuppa link=1207024686/0#2 date=1207046803
          i guess my question is how much ground coffee would come from a 250gr pack of beans...
          ehhhhh.... 250grams..... with maybe a gram or less of the last beans ground in your bag.... and with the same amount of yours left in the grinder for the next customer..... most retain a little bit of coffee.....

          But still 250 grams!

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Quick Question

            Originally posted by cuppa link=1207024686/0#2 date=1207046803
            i guess my question is how much ground coffee would come from a 250gr pack of beans...
            Well..if you tipped 250g of beans in your grinder,. and didnt spill any,.. you would finish up with 250g of ground coffee. The weight remains the same,..however it will look less as it is more compact.

            Depending on how much you dose into your baskets, this will determine how many shots you can pull from that amount.  I put 20g in a double basket,.. so therefore I expect I should be able get 12.5 doubles from 250g,.. and know it will last me 6 days without blowins and about 4 days if I have 4 blowins who enjoy doubles too.

            I find if I grind as I go and only put in enough beans per shot (measuring a level double basket of beans into the hopper - tip learned from ThunderGod) tap the chute,..I waste little to nothing.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Quick Question

              whaahahaha... a trifecta answer!!!

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Quick Question

                thanks very much...i suspected it would be the same :P
                the argument was that grinding 250gr of beans would produce some wastage, thereby it was more cost effective to buy good quality, preground coffee (also eliminating the need of a good grinder).
                my argument was that by having a good grinder your beans were actually fresher longer as you only ground exactly what was needed...and of course the preground coffee life was significantly less...
                hope that is a bit clearer....and thanks very much for your responses, just wanted to be sure i am on the right track as i am new and learning very much from the experienced folk here. ;D
                thanks again

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Quick Question

                  Some wastage is correct but negligible.

                  Depends on the grinder.

                  M sunbeam 0450 is a messy little bastard and retains quite a lot of grinds in the chute.
                  My MDF and Macap are a lot less greedy and tend to give me almost everything back.

                  The few stray grinds left behind I doubt would register any weight at all on my scales.
                  So their wastage argument falls flat in real dollars and cents.

                  Ive preground in the morning before I took the MDF to work and it wasnt drinkable that afternoon.

                  Their argument is based on false economy.
                  But if they prefer the taste of pre-ground then so be it.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Quick Question

                    Originally posted by cuppa link=1207024686/0#7 date=1207048427
                    thanks very much...i suspected it would be the same :P
                    the argument was that grinding 250gr of beans would produce some wastage, thereby it was more cost effective to buy good quality, preground coffee (also eliminating the need of a good grinder).
                    the main problem with pre-ground is that it is stale before it is pakaged -it has to be otherwise it would continue to leak CO2 which would puff up the packaging

                    Trouble is that once you eliminate the CO2 you also eliminate any fresh characteristics of the coffee, which can only be obtained by grinding fresh coffee fresh to order

                    I used pre-ground for several years until I invested in a grinder, and I managed to get reasonable results - at least it allowed my to refine my home coffee making technique

                    But once you taste the freshness and flavour of ground-to-order coffee, especially if youre roasting your own, its hard if not imposible to go back to anything else!

                    Cheers,

                    Pat

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