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  • #31
    Originally posted by Westy5 View Post
    This looks like a good place for my question. When roasting a blend do you roast different beans separately then mix them together or do you mix green beans then roast? Or is there another method?
    The following articles provide a discussion of pre- and post-blending of coffees that may help you understand one over the other.

    https://legacy.sweetmarias.com/library/blending/

    https://perfectdailygrind.com/2018/0...coffee-blends/

    My research suggests that commercial roasters post-blend for efficiency if they roast to fulfill both single origin and blended coffees. Another good reason to post-blend is if you have beans that require different profiles and a compromised profile is not possible. I have a blend where Brazil and Kenya are part of its composition. The Brazil requires gentler heat and possibly a longer roast. The Kenya can take a bit of heat and can be a faster roast. I also roast them to different probe temperature. I like each coffee to pull its own weight in the blend. Hence, post-blending works for me.

    Pre-blending works if the component coffees of the blend have similar roast profile or you can develop a compromised profile that gives you good flavour. Pre-blending will also be more efficient in this situation. If you use a popcorn machine, pre-blending might be for you unless you want to roast your component coffees to different roast level (colour).

    Comment


    • #32
      Originally posted by Westy5 View Post
      Thanks Ninja. I only roast in a popcorn popper so either method sounds easy enough to achieve. Is there one you would recommend over the other?
      No idea! I've never roasted, I just asked a roster the same question once. I would imagine roasting separately will give the best results because each component can be at their best. Sounds like it's worth an experiment!

      Comment


      • #33
        I wish there was an easier way to test both temp and pressure, on older machines that don't have gauges or PID etc

        The main thing you hear and read about is brew temperature for getting good shots (once grind and tamp is dialled)
        And the point of a decent espresso machine is to get 9 bars of pressure to extract all the good oils etc from a bed of coffee.

        Super frustrating as a newbie, with limited $$$'s

        Comment


        • PeejayGong
          PeejayGong commented
          Editing a comment
          *best user name I've seen Barry O'speedwagon...!
          In to old cars as well?
          As you said 'as long as it's not out of whack', that's the point right there...
          How do you measure your boiler pressure range?
          A gauge?
          Timing the boiler indicator light switching on/off?

          I'm now on the hunt for a group head temp sticker *of which I'm sure they don't make for my machine!!!
          -slaps self on forehead

        • level3ninja
          level3ninja commented
          Editing a comment
          If you google "Thermax® 8 Level Temperature Strip Labels" you'll find one with a temperature range 71-110°C, will give you a bit of an idea. There are ones available from overseas that do 90-120°C but I couldn't find any locally. eBay item 231458660166 for example

        • Barry O'Speedwagon
          Barry O'Speedwagon commented
          Editing a comment
          PeejayGong,
          The Cremina has a pressure gauge, so I just look at it (I've adjusted the pressurestat when I first bought it so that it ranges from about 7.5bar-9.0 bar but pull shots at around 8 bars). That, combined with the temperature sticker on the group (I make sure it is at 80 degrees before every shot). If I didn't have pressure gauge, I might do as you suggest and try to pull shots at a consistent point in the boiler on/off cycle, and work from there.

          The Speedwagon (REO) was a firetruck actually.

          Cheers

      • #34
        So, I might as well ask this one here.
        I've had a bit of a leak develop during the shot which poking around has led me to believe that the valves and/or seals in the group require attention, so I've ordered the E61 Grouphead maintenance kit from CoffeeParts and some other bits and pieces.
        I had a look at the mushroom the other day and whilst it does not have much scale on it, it is black, which I gather is not ideal (I know, should have taken a picture but forgot to )
        The question is, what is best to clean the black layer? Just citric acid solution? Light scourer pressure?

        Cheers.

        Comment


        • roosterben
          roosterben commented
          Editing a comment
          The mushroom valve if you have it removed soak for overnight or for a few hours in citric acid and warm water. If it is the inside of the group you could put some citric acid and warm water to soften then scrub with a scourer or group head brush. On the inside of groups I use a drill bit wire brush attachment to clean. This has been linked before on the forum a few time checkout this video from Rick Bond https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1C0VdpfGXhc

        • fatboy_1999
          fatboy_1999 commented
          Editing a comment
          Yes, I saw the video, it's excellent. I was just wondering if soaking overnight could be too long.

      • #35
        Something I’ve been wondering lately ... When is Tony Abbott going to “shirt front” Vladimir Putin? Obviously a few years in the making now. Probably forgotten. But surely it will be happening soon?

        Comment


        • #36
          File photo:
          Attached Files

          Comment


          • saeco_user
            saeco_user commented
            Editing a comment
            Putin: "Tony who??"

        • #37
          Hi - found my way here via whirlpool forums and having trouble figuring out where to start so would appreciate any guidance! Now that I'm working (and drinking coffee) more frequently at home, I am considering stepping up from a bodum french press, supermarket (lavazza) ground and (embarrassingly) microwaved milk to something more sophisticated. Keen to understand what grinders and entry level brewing equipment I should begin to look at to have a better experience. Mthks in advance!

          Comment


          • FTMAN
            FTMAN commented
            Editing a comment
            appreciate your inputs, fatboy! certainly helpful in pointing me in the right direction
            so, safe to say i'll settle for a single boiler, but i might hold off on the brewer for now given the budget limitations and focus initally on a better grinder. I'm seeing a bias in threads in the grinders section towards either the Baratza Sette 270 and Eureka Mignon, which are roughly the same price as the Compak K3 (c. $500). Prefer the look of them, too...!

          • Javaphile
            Javaphile commented
            Editing a comment
            Have a look at our For Sale area where you can frequently pick up a grinder that will last you for decades for the price you're looking at paying for a plastic disposable one. Good prices can typically be found on better than disposable espresso machines as well.


            Java "It pays to shop around" phile

          • FTMAN
            FTMAN commented
            Editing a comment
            ok, so I think I've got my head around the grinder aspect, thanks for the head-start! Now I'm keen to delve into the machine, but feel like the choice is even more complex...what things should i be looking for given my preference for milk-based drinks and what differentiates a con/prosumer appliance from (semi)-commercial/non-appliance in that respect?

            For example, with grinders, I've understood the key differentiators are to do with the burrs - i.e. flat vs conical and the size. In the case of the machine, I'm guessing the size of the boiler and PID - am I getting warm (*edit* pun unintended!)? I think a double boiler would be overkill for my needs and not something i'm willing to pay for (in lieu of other features), but will I notice a difference between a single boiler and a HX? And throw thermoblocks in the mix, too!

        • #38
          Originally posted by matth3wh View Post
          Something I’ve been wondering lately ... When is Tony Abbott going to “shirt front” Vladimir Putin? Obviously a few years in the making now. Probably forgotten. But surely it will be happening soon?
          I think the Mad Monk decided he didn't need to after watching Russia's promo for the Sochi Olympics.



          Not sure whether it had much to with coffee though.

          Comment


          • #39
            Am I the only one that washes their portafilters and baskets daily? I would take them apart and wash them with regular dishwater detergent. But it appears general guides suggest washing these weekly, and simply rinsing them with the espresso machine hot water. Does everyone else simply rinse them out?

            Comment


            • Barry O'Speedwagon
              Barry O'Speedwagon commented
              Editing a comment
              Yep. I use a naked portafilter, which makes it even easier to keep handle and basket clean. Every few weeks I might soak the basket in Cafetto.

          • #40
            Another one from a newbie. What are the essential cleaning consumables and replacement parts someone should keep on hand for an e61 machine? - Espresso machine cleaner - grinder cleaner (grindz) - descale liquid??? - food grade grease - gasket replacements? What other spare parts? Looking to do a bulk buy.

            Comment


            • #41
              I pull the baskets out and rinse thoroughly every time but don't soak every day. The more you rinse them the less soaking they need.

              I wouldn't bother with grindz, open your grinder up to clean it.

              Comment


              • #42
                Originally posted by chillipaste View Post
                Am I the only one that washes their portafilters and baskets daily? I would take them apart and wash them with regular dishwater detergent. But it appears general guides suggest washing these weekly, and simply rinsing them with the espresso machine hot water. Does everyone else simply rinse them out?
                Nope not the only one! I give the basket and in the portfilter a quick scrub with detergent (one if those sponge tubey things that holds detergent). If I use the double spouts, I'll even use the machine bristles to give the pathway of the spouts a bit of a scrub. Doesn't take long, much better to not have any residual coffee oils for your next shots!

                Comment


                • barri
                  barri commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Me too! I wash baskets, portafilter and milk jug with detergent every day!

              • #43
                Another newbie question. I’ve started looking into upgrading from a popper to bread maker for roasting. I see a lot of people say they need to modify their bread makers to prevent it from shutting off after a set time on the knead setting.
                How long would the average Corretto roast take? Would a 15min timeframe be enough or would the bread maker need modifying?

                Comment


                • Dimal
                  Dimal commented
                  Editing a comment
                  You'll need to have some time up your sleeve with a Corretto so a kneading time of at least 25 minutes would be ideal...
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