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  • when is extracted "over extracted"?

    hi all,
    i just did a quick search on key words "over extracted" and didnt find a quick answer so i thought id do the fun thing and start a new topic.

    the thing is, id read somewhere, in here, that you should cut the shot when it turns "blond" colored.
    but i was watching a "PRO" barristor on TV the other day, and he seemed to keep it pooring long after i would have judged it as "blond".
    have i been cutting my shots short too much and whats some ideas on exactly how to judge this a bit better.

    will i end up with a really nasty taste if i over extract too long?
    Oh! and i thought that maybe you get more Crema Head if you extract longer, but then i thought that i had read that the crema is the first thing that comes into your cup....

    any help?

    thanks

  • #2
    Re: when is extracted "over extracted"?

    It sounds like youre on the right track gmeddy. Maybe you should stop watching the "pros". Its quite rare that you find "pros" that actually know how to make good espresso. The start of the shot is where all the crema & sweetness is so stick with what youre doing.

    Evan.

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    • #3
      Re: when is extracted "over extracted"?

      That barista sounds a bit dodgy mate :-/..... Best thing is to just stick with what tastes best to you. If you enjoy a bit of a read about this aspect of espresso, here is a great article on how to get the best from the bean into your cup from the Home Barista website... http://www.home-barista.com/espresso...tractions.html Lots of other good stuff to be found there too....

      Cheers ,
      Mal.

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      • #4
        Re: when is extracted "over extracted"?

        Hey, you sure he wasnt a Barrister? Easy mistake to make.


        Evan.

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        • #5
          Re: when is extracted "over extracted"?

          well theres a caramel/gold blond and a pale blond...but I think if the opportunity is there, experiment with the shot cycle by changing variables; like dosage, shot times, grind...etc

          dont drink whole coffees though...you will end up having a heart problem ;D
          definitely taste the coffee though. In the past I have done this and you can taste the difference. From what I know the rich chocolate crema at the start is your coffee oil...direct from source
          The blonde is the coffee breaking down into solubles and has no benefit for flavour. espresso is oil of the coffee yet this blonde appears when this oil resources exhause

          what happens when crude oil runs out? :-?

          the flavour is in the oil not in what follows...however I have heard of running into the blonding and letting the shot run a little long for flavour...but i have tasted just this pale blonde part of the shot...and I wouldnt feed it to my dog...

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          • #6
            Re: when is extracted "over extracted"?

            mmm yes yes,
            last night i was pooring two shots at once, and only let the first little bit fall into my wifes cup, then i moved my cup accross to take both poors and stopped it a bit later once it had turned blond.
            i made my wifes into a short latae and mine also.
            mine tasted about the same as usual, but my wife said hers was the best id ever made her.
            so i guess it does make a difference hey...
            next time ill try it myself.

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            • #7
              Re: when is extracted "over extracted"?

              So your wife had a ristretto. This is my favourite way of making coffee.
              My suspicion is that this is also one reason behind the popularity of overdosing. Ie--if a standard dose is 14 gms of coffee grounds to produce 50-60 ml of coffee, then using 22gms to produce 50-60 ml is moving into ristretto range.
              Greg

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              • #8
                Re: when is extracted "over extracted"?

                Originally posted by GregWormald link=1214567946/0#6 date=1214702801
                So your wife had a ristretto. This is my favourite way of making coffee.
                My suspicion is that this is also one reason behind the popularity of overdosing. Ie--if a standard dose is 14 gms of coffee grounds to produce 50-60 ml of coffee, then using 22gms to produce 50-60 ml is moving into ristretto range.
                Greg

                Interesting you bring this up...perhaps you should do some research in to coffee extraction ratios

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: when is extracted "over extracted"?

                  Overextracting also seems to occur if the shot is pulled over a too long time even without blonding. THis may occur if your grind is too fine and/or you updose and pull the shot beyond the ristretto mentioned. From my experience on the Presso this seems to happen after as little as 10 seconds longer the 20 second benchmark for a shot.

                  Over extracting can also occur if your grind is uneven, ie alot of powder in your grind which is fully extracted very quickly. This is one reason why this forum bangs-on so much about the importance of a quality grinder if you want to make superb coffee.

                  The tell tale sign of overextracting in this way is an ammonia taste in the shot which is a bit of a disappointment when it occurs.

                  Jason

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                  • #10
                    Re: when is extracted "over extracted"?

                    Originally posted by Wushoes - David S link=1214567946/0#7 date=1214797266
                    Interesting you bring this up...perhaps you should do some research in to coffee extraction ratios
                    Thanks for the pointer--I had seen the concept mentioned but never followed it up. This is something else to add to the complexity.

                    I just had a look at the Home Barista discussion (http://www.home-barista.com/forums/brewing-ratios-for-espresso-beverages-t2402.html), and while it is very interesting, it doesnt seem to match the "usual recipe" of a double dose to produce two 30 ml espressos. This would appear to be a lungo.

                    It does however confirm to me that I like ristrettos--with my usual 14-16 gms of coffee producing about 20 ml of beverage.

                    Greg

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