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  • Best beans and how to store them??

    I recently bought some campos beans (superior blend) as I've heard they produce a great cup! My question is, what are your recommendations for the best beans (pre-roasted) and the best way to store them??

  • #2
    Best beans and how to store them??

    Beanbay (right here!) sells some great fresh-roasted beans in a variety of styles - I'd suggest trying a few or ordering the starter pack! Otherwise let us know where you are and perhaps we could point to some local roasters...

    As for storage, most fresh-roasted beans will be supplied in a one-way-valved bag which is fairly good at keeping your beans fresh. You can expect them to last 2-3 weeks from the roast date before they start to taste stale. Keep them out of sunlight and always squeeze as much air out of the bag as possible to prolong their life. :-)

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    • #3
      Agree with Fruity about the bags.

      Does anyone ever put desiccant bags (to soak up the moisture) in their one-way-valved bag?
      After a couple of very humid days in Melbourne in December, the beans just really sucked up all that moisture and the coffee became quite unpleasant.

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      • #4
        I don't.

        How would the beans have absorbed any moisture if they were in a closed valved bag?

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        • #5
          Agreed, something else was going on there. Humidity = grind adjustment ?
          My own coffee was fine, I just adjusted the grind.
          Same with the previous post about 'squeezing air' out of the bags. While the beans are degassing
          the air in the bag (from when the beans were packed) is purged by the CO2. (approx. 10 ltrs/kg roasted beans)

          "Carbon dioxide is a friend of coffee: since it preserves and even enhances quality.
          Carbon dioxide that escapes from beans forms a barrier against coffee's biggest enemy, oxygen
          and the oxidation process it fuels. Oxidation is part of staling, and it degrades quality by altering
          coffee's essential oils and aromatic components, ultimately creating a rancid taste akin to butter left out too long."

          Quote from 'The Coffee Storage Conundrum"

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          • #6
            Best beans and how to store them??

            I'd never thought to include desiccant in browns - they don't seem to last long enough to warrant it. ;-)

            But I have been wondering if its worth keeping some desiccant in/around greens to prevent mould. Thoughts?

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            • #7
              Nah, wouldn't bother.

              Powdery mildew is one of the moulds that will grow on beans in storage. It needs humidity, moderate light,
              mild temps (11°-28°) and a very minimal amount of free water, generally speaking.
              If your greens are in the CS cotton bags then as long as they stay as dry, as cool as possible and not exposed to still, humid air, they will be good. Lots of CSers keep their bagged beans in cupboards (dark and dry).......perfect.
              And if the cupboard had some minimal ventilation, like non airtight doors or some vent holes, even better.

              Your beans would have to get hot enough to sweat and then not dry quickly, to get powdery. Pretty unlikely.

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              • #8
                Best beans and how to store them??

                Well mine will just stay in the cupboard then! I could always put the rice next to it.

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                • #9
                  Graeme

                  Do any members use vacuum seal bags to help with storage longevity

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Graeme View Post
                    Do any members use vacuum seal bags to help with storage longevity
                    Basically, no.

                    The reduced pressure from the initial vacuum causes the tasty volative oils to evaporate, and the outgassing of CO2 causes the bags to expand anyway.

                    For slightly longer than normal storage some members do heat seal their bags after expelling the excess air.

                    Greg

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                    • #11
                      what about vacuum sealing greens, though?

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Hildy View Post
                        what about vacuum sealing greens, though?
                        No need, green are best stored in a cool dry dark place in a breathable bag, cloth or paper.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Hildy View Post
                          what about vacuum sealing greens, though?
                          For roasted; definitely not. You would have to degas the beans before vacuum sealing;
                          in other words, have them almost stale first, before packaging for storage.

                          As for greens, it is becoming increasingly common for Cup of Excellence beans to be shipped in 15 kg vacuum packs, however,
                          I would only consider it for home if I lived in the tropics during the wet season, had no humidity control and was buying more
                          beans than I could roast in a month or two. Coffee is'nt like wine and creating a coffee 'cellar' can be tempting
                          (I've done it myself) but keeping green beans longer than 12 months can lead to quality issues in the roasted product.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by chokkidog View Post
                            For roasted; definitely not. You would have to degas the beans before vacuum sealing;
                            in other words, have them almost stale first, before packaging for storage.

                            As for greens, it is becoming increasingly common for Cup of Excellence beans to be shipped in 15 kg vacuum packs, however,
                            I would only consider it for home if I lived in the tropics during the wet season, had no humidity control and was buying more
                            beans than I could roast in a month or two. Coffee is'nt like wine and creating a coffee 'cellar' can be tempting
                            (I've done it myself) but keeping green beans longer than 12 months can lead to quality issues in the roasted product.
                            Wise words CD, in the past I've stockpiled up to around 30kg of green, a pointless exercise, now I keep about 20kg on hand (approx 6 months supply)

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