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  • freeze roasted beans will lose flavor

    I bought some roasted SO beans and some green SO beans for experimenting with coffee blends. At the roasters. these roasted beans came out from a cool-room freezer. So when I got home, I put them in the freezer too. The roasted SO beans i bought tasted great, I tried indonesian sulu wesi, indonesian mandheling, brazil, ethopian . I tried them like 1-2 days gap, with condense milk. I am not a regular coffee drinker, so I had to stretch the coffee drinking a bit, to sink in the taste,flavor,aroma,etc. The next stage, I mix these SO roasted beans and play around the proportions - tasted aweful. Something seem wrong, so I went back to test the SO manhedling, the flavor was not the same as I 1st bought it. I think frozen roasted coffeebean may have spoil the flavor, or time gap (3wks from 1st taste) have been too long a shelf life for the coffee. I pound the coffee beans before every brew. My next stage is to roast the green beans and compare my roast with the ones I bought. But since my purchase roasted beans have gone off flavour, I think I am stuck with 250gmX4(variety) of flavor expired beans, can I re-roast them to lifen them up? Can anyone shed some light pls, thanks in advance. Also - I bought these beans and had these plans before knowing about this coffeesnobs site, then I spent many weeks going over the blend section and was a great help in getting me educated on the do's dont and trials and errors of other experts or hobbyists in this blending game. Thank you

  • #2
    The first place you went wrong was putting them in the freezer! Once coffee is roasted it needs to be placed in a sealed bag to age between 5 and 14 days to get the best results. Coffee is very delicate, It hates the cold/heat and sunlight. Keep then in a airtight container in the cupboard and only grind as you need. As ground coffee will go stale after 10-15 minutes after grinding and whole beans will go stale within 24 hours out of the bag.

    Re roasting beans will not get them back to life. Best thing to do is toss them in the bin and start again. Blending coffee is an art form and takes many years of practise and kg too. start off with a nice base coffee like a brasil or a colombia and add 20% here and 10% there of other beans to get the flavour you want.

    Hope this helps

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    • #3
      Originally posted by otahotah View Post
      I pound the coffee beans before every brew.
      Yikes!!! I hope you meant to say "I grind the coffee beans..." or do you really pound them?????!!!!!! If you do it is definitely time to buy a proper coffee grinder as this will make all the difference in the world.

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      • #4
        Understand your reaction re pounding.

        Bear in mind the fact that a large part of the coffee drinking word do in fact grind their beans using a mortar and pestle or similar ASMR Kitchen - Mortar Pestle 02 Grinding Coffee - YouTube looks like the bloke in the clip did a pretty good job, not sure I would have the patience to spend 7 mins grinding a few grams of coffee in a M&P.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Yelta View Post
          Understand your reaction re pounding.

          Bear in mind the fact that a large part of the coffee drinking word do in fact grind their beans using a mortar and pestle or similar ASMR Kitchen - Mortar Pestle 02 Grinding Coffee - YouTube looks like the bloke in the clip did a pretty good job, not sure I would have the patience to spend 7 mins grinding a few grams of coffee in a M&P.
          I'm well aware of that and I am pretty sure that somewhere in the world there are people who still rub sticks together to get a fire going as well. What surprises me is that it is possible to find someone on Coffee Snobs who "pounds their coffee" and then expresses shock that the results in the cup are inconsistent and disappointing

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          • #6
            Welcome Otahotah,

            Where are you located? Singapore/Malaysia (just guessing from the username)? I'm also guessing that your roaster had been keeping the beans in the freezer because their shop has no air con. As the others have said, freezing the beans isn't a great idea, and certainly don't try roasting them twice (save that for duck ) I'd consider the frozen roasted beans as a learning experience, and concentrate on getting the best out of your green beans. Try to find somewhere dark and cool, but not freezing.

            Cheers
            BOSW

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            • #7
              thanks to everybody who commented on my thread. yes I pound them, this way i can see the and feel and examine the roasted beans that i bought, for example the ethopian had heaps of peals (silver something cant think of the jargon). One of the SO had beans that are crunchy brown, others the feel and texture is a bit different. One could slowly smell the aroma, and guess what - after I brewed them I even kept the sediments/coarse bits in a small port glass for 5days - and coming back for a sniff. From pounding the beans to brew to drink to after-sniff, I noticed some beans still have the power-in-the aroma whilst others faded. In particular, the brazilian and manhedaling but less so the sulawesi and ethopian. I am located in sydney, I bought those beans from a reputed local roaster, my aim is to recreated the typical southeast asian coffee which they drink with condensed milk. So it may seem odd me being a newbie, not a coffee addict, doing things may seem out of the ordinary. But hopefully I can create the blend recepes of say indonesian aroma kopi etc. Their mix would be some robusta, liberica, arabica roasted with sugar margarine sesame salt corn(maybe) . Try this in your roaster or grind these in your grinder and you will spend hrs cleaning the equipment. I will plod along with this experiment and see what i encounter. Thanks again for all your input.

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              • #8
                Freezing works fine if you freeze it in an airtight container (so it doesn't absorb the freezer smells) then don't open the container until fully thawed (so condensation doesn't form on the beans).

                I've got a bag thawing at the moment that I'll crack open tomorrow morn. Went a bit overboard testing out a new roaster a few weeks back

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Hamburglar View Post
                  Freezing works fine if you freeze it in an airtight container (so it doesn't absorb the freezer smells) then don't open the container until fully thawed (so condensation doesn't form on the beans). I've got a bag thawing at the moment that I'll crack open tomorrow morn. Went a bit overboard testing out a new roaster a few weeks back
                  my coffee beans comes in those special coffee heavy duty clear plastic bags with zips and with a 1-way purge value.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Yelta View Post
                    Understand your reaction re pounding. Bear in mind the fact that a large part of the coffee drinking word do in fact grind their beans using a mortar and pestle or similar ASMR Kitchen - Mortar Pestle 02 Grinding Coffee - YouTube looks like the bloke in the clip did a pretty good job, not sure I would have the patience to spend 7 mins grinding a few grams of coffee in a M&P.
                    I saw the youtube video, this chap is using force to crush the beans. Its strenous and time consuming. A better approach is just put the mortar pestel into a large plastic bag and pound away, instead of crushing the beans. pound away means - the distance of at least 20mm to 40mm distance between pestal and motar base. Initially when the beans are whole, then reduce this distance, Once there is less chances of spill 40.60mm distance is OK. - The spills are trapped in the bag. The pestal must not be flat but oblong, The motar must also be eclipse-shape instead of round. Then pounding is easy relax and fun.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Hamburglar View Post
                      Freezing works fine if you freeze it in an airtight container (so it doesn't absorb the freezer smells) then don't open the container until fully thawed (so condensation doesn't form on the beans).

                      I've got a bag thawing at the moment that I'll crack open tomorrow morn. Went a bit overboard testing out a new roaster a few weeks back
                      I can't say that I agree with this... at all. Airtight or not, there is some water present in the beans and this water will freeze, cell walls will rupture and there will be effects at both the molecular and macro levels. Other changes also occur to the oils within the beans so please never assume that freezing is benign... because it ain't.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Vinitasse View Post
                        I can't say that I agree with this... at all.
                        Well have you actually tried it?

                        Cell walls rupturing? Other changes occurring to the oils? Please cite evidence.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Hamburglar View Post
                          Well have you actually tried it?

                          Cell walls rupturing? Other changes occurring to the oils? Please cite evidence.
                          I'll cite my palate as evidence. Nevertheless, should your palate be in disagreement, you should do whatever suits it best

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                          • #14
                            Serious question -will it really be possible to tell if the coffee isnt at its best, after adding sweetened condensed milk, margarine, sugar, sesame (!) and corn (syrup?)?

                            Ive had the coffee in Malaysia, which is commonly served with sweetened condensed milk; I dont think much origin character is getting through that.

                            The OP states he isnt a regular coffee drinker; are you just getting into coffee, or are you hoping to make this for groups of friends?

                            If its the former, I'd like to suggest trying a coffee with less additives

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Talk_Coffee View Post
                              I'll cite my palate as evidence. Nevertheless, should your palate be in disagreement, you should do whatever suits it best
                              Comparing frozen for a few weeks/months vs sitting on the shelf for the same length of time? Or comparing frozen for a few weeks/months vs freshly roasted?

                              I'd pick frozen over 'aged on the shelf' any day of the week..... but definitely not over freshly roasted stuff.

                              This is the 2nd pour of the day. Just thawed out last night. It's a Rwandan, just over 3weeks old, and still has slightly harsh acidity and uberfizz crema of freshly roasted stuff. If I hadn't frozen it, by now it'd be a spotchy oily mess which would be almost ready to bin.
                              Attached Files
                              Last edited by Hamburglar; 6 May 2013, 09:32 AM.

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