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Resting - Methods and Optimal Length

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  • Resting - Methods and Optimal Length

    I have been roasting for 9 months or so with a popper. I am very excited to have purchased a Gene Cafe. Now that full control is at my fingertips in terms of times and temperature I am wondering about the imporatance of resting coffee. The reason is as follows:

    i) I drink straight expresso so I tend to roast until just after second crack when a good amount of smoke is coming off.
    ii) I find that If I dont go to this point I get a citrus/acid taste rather than the mellow choclatey flavour that I am after.
    iii) Often I find that when I try the coffee after a 12-24 hrs of resting it tastes a little burnt or muddy or both.
    iv) A week later it tastes much better and the burnt/muddy taste is gone.

    So my questions are:

    i) If the coffee is rested in an non-airtight container will it improve more quickly? Should it be put in a sealed container after 24 hrs of resting in an open or non-airtight container?
    ii) Does anyone have any thoughts on optimal resting times or conditions?
    iii) How does resting rank as a method of improving the flavour? i.e. does it have little effect relative to the perfect roasting time?

    All thoughts would be welcome.

    /me

  • #2
    Re: Resting - Methods and Optimal Length

    Hi Barracuda,

    I think that this is something that one cant really generalise about, but here is what I have experienced:

    *I usually like my espresso between about four and twenty one days old, depending on a myriad of factors. These days I try to age most of my home (err ... work) roasts for five days or so, but invariably I end up trying them at three days out of curiosity, then preferring them at five ;P

    *French press, vac pot, etc. tend to be good to go a few days earlier than espresso.

    *You can leave coffee sitting around exposed to the air to age it more quickly, but it seems to knock a few days off the shelf life.

    *Darker roasts tend to be ready earlier than light roasts and tend to have a shorter shelf life.

    *Faster roasts tend to be ready earlier than slower roasts and tend to have a shorter shelf life.

    *Robusta and Monsooned coffees in particular benefit from longer resting periods.

    Cheers,

    Luca

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    • #3
      Re: Resting - Methods and Optimal Length

      Tks Luca, these little bits of info help alot. I am starting to suspect resting time is a more subtle component.

      /me

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      • #4
        Re: Resting - Methods and Optimal Length

        Anybody got any hints on how long after roasting is it safe to put the beans in a one way valve bag ?

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        • #5
          Re: Resting - Methods and Optimal Length

          Originally posted by Boldor link=1167983339/0#3 date=1168076557
          Anybody got any hints on how long after roasting is it safe to put the beans in a one way valve bag ?
          If you do a search on the site there are a couple of threads on this subject.

          I put mine in straight away, that is, as soon as they are cooled to room temp, I weigh them in the bag and seal.

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          • #6
            Re: Resting - Methods and Optimal Length

            Ditto. Straight away after cooling.

            Maybe leave them out a couple of hours or so if I am forced to start using them within 24 hours because the previous batch has run out.

            -Robusto

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            • #7
              Re: Resting - Methods and Optimal Length

              Ive waited till they have fully cooled before bagging them but I seem to get what looks like sweating from the beans. I cooled them in sieves in an airconditioned room bagged them and stored them in a cool dark cupboard.

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              • #8
                Re: Resting - Methods and Optimal Length

                Boldor,
                It sounds like it is oil from the coffee beans.
                This is more to do with the length of the roast rather than the heat when bagging.

                Even if your roast does not show oil on the beans once completed (EG: Just into 2nd crack), some oils will begin to show the longer they rest.

                This is perfectly normal.

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                • #9
                  Re: Resting - Methods and Optimal Length

                  Originally posted by Boldor link=1167983339/0#3 date=1168076557
                  Anybody got any hints on how long after roasting is it safe to put the beans in a one way valve bag ?
                  I put mine straight into a black valve-bag as soon as I finish roasting.
                  Batches of roasted beans are cooled to ambient with the air-suction-cooler (bean bucket).
                  Then blended thoroughly in the big stock pot once all batches are done, and bagged for resting.

                  I only use the bags for resting. When Im ready to use the beans for day-to-day I transfer to my little airtight s/s jar.
                  I found that if I used them for day-to-day access of my beans, the press-seal at the top would come unstuck from the bag after a few weeks.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Resting - Methods and Optimal Length

                    Thanks for all the replies, Ill see how the beans go.

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