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Are commercial beans coated?

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  • Are commercial beans coated?

    My hottop has done roast no 77 today. We tried a whole range of light to dark roasts with good results in terms of taste.

    However, my beans do not LOOK like beans bought at the supermarket/ from professional roasters. So I wonder if the commercial guys put a coating on their beans??? (Hope this is not a really DUMB question....)

    My lighter roasts are expectedly dull outside and become more shiny as the roast gets darker. With the darker roasts, a few oily spots can be seen as the Hottop ejects the beans but the oily spots then disappear as it seems to spread throughout the "other" beans during the cooling period and leave a consistent shiny surface on all the beans. So the roast starts off looking looks "normal".

    I am really bad at resisting the temptation to start cupping straight away and the 250 g roast seldom lasts longer than a week.

    After a few days, the beans develop a watery look on the surface that I have never seen with beans I bought. This doesnt seem to be related to humidity or different ways of storage. It seems to be "normal" and does not affect the taste.

    It probably doesn :-[t matter but I am still interested to know what it is about and if there are tricks of the trade a home roaster could be initiated to on the quest for the elusive perfect roast.

  • #2
    Re: Are commercial beans coated?

    What I have gathered so far is that when beans start to go stale, (Like supermarket beans would be) They can start to sweat, and this is bad. sweaty beans means stale beans. Also beans that have just been roasted to a darker roast they tend to realease the oils from the beans and this also gives a glossy oily texture on the beans.

    Please correct me if I am wrong. This is only what I believe happends.

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    • #3
      Re: Are commercial beans coated?

      Hey mate the beans you are talking about are either stale over roasted or both. Im sure your taste better.

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      • #4
        Re: Are commercial beans coated?

        Originally posted by willemvw link=1182596079/0#0 date=1182596079
        After a few days, the beans develop a watery look on the surface that I have never seen with beans I bought. This doesnt seem to be related to humidity or different ways of storage. It seems to be "normal" and does not affect the taste.
        can you describe more what you mean by watery? its most likely oils appearing on the surface. often roasted coffee (more so with darker roasts) will oil up as they age, even though there may not be much oils just after roasting. if it tastes fine to you, i wouldnt worry

        the elusive perfect roast.
        i dont believe there is any one perfect roast for a given coffee bean... coffee is amazing and for the one bean, you can experience many characteristics at different roasts. certainly there are extremes to avoid (ie. under roasting, baking, char-grilling)... but other than that, experiment and roast to what you like

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        • #5
          Re: Are commercial beans coated?

          It may be oil coming to the surface although it looks different from the oil visible immediately after a dark roast (well, the beans are hot then so it would look different). It is a more diffuse shiny look that can cover large parts of the surface rather than goblets of oil. I will attempt to take a photo.

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          • #6
            Re: Are commercial beans coated?


            After a few days, the beans develop a watery look on the surface that I have never seen with beans I bought.
            Certainly sounds like you are describing coffee oils. This is a good thing! A dark roast will produce oil in the roaster but a lighter roast (assuming it was a reasonable profile and nudged second crack) will produce oil spotting a few days to a fortnight later depending on origin. This oil will react with oxygen and evaporate from the surface of the beans after a period of air contact. Keeping the bean in an air tight container (or valve bag) will cause the oil to hang around longer.

            Therefore the questions remaining are:

            Is supermarket bought coffee too fresh to show oil on the surface when you buy it?

            Or

            Is supermarket coffee packed stale to stop the bags from expanding during degassing and thus had any coffee oil evaporate?

            As a footnote, I rarely find the optimum roast would be one that produces oil in the roaster but would be disappointed if they dry surface appearance doesn’t produce some oil in the following fortnight.

            Leave some of your oil spotted beans on a window ledge and see how long the oil stays on the surface.

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            • #7
              Re: Are commercial beans coated?

              [QUOTE=Andy Freeman link=1182596079/0#5 date=1182603292]

              Therefore the questions remaining are:

              Is supermarket bought coffee too fresh to show oil on the surface when you buy it?

              Or

              Is supermarket coffee packed stale to stop the bags from expanding during degassing and thus had any coffee oil evaporate?

              Ooh! Ooh! Pick me! Pick me!

              Ill lock away "B"  >

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              • #8
                Re: Are commercial beans coated?

                Couldnt get the picture attached but I get the drift.

                Will apply the Freeman Windowsill Test and report back. Hope the Beans Rights mob dont get me in trouble for treating the unfortunate experimental beans like their poor cousins in the supermarket....

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