Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Can I darken a roast?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Can I darken a roast?

    Currently toying with the idea of DIY roasting, since my local roaster has discontinued my favourite blend. Yes, this may sound barmy to the seasoned roaster.

    I wanted to know if it is possible to darken (or further roast) beans once they have been roasted and cooled? Some of the blends I have recently tried are lighter than I would prefer and would like to experiment just darkening the roast.

  • #2
    Re: Can I darken a roast?

    rong,

    on the odd occasion I have tried to re-roast beans (because of a power failure).... if early enough (well before first crack) it works pretty well.... but once roasted to anything close to FC or beyond (certainly any beans purchased from a roaster).... the result is disgusting!!!

    And not all blends can be roasted together some are mixed post roast.....

    Id suggest you start roasting your own green beans..... that way you have control over the roast depth and will get good results....

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Can I darken a roast?

      The idea of double-roasting is controversial. The practice is used to roast beans to a point where moisture content is minimised, then cooled, then roasted again. The beans that go in for the second time would probably be way lighter than the beans you are starting with.

      Some say double-roasting causes less damage to the bean surface, but I havent seen or tasted any results, so dont know about that.

      Go ahead and experiment though - its always fun to try out something new!

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Can I darken a roast?

        Given that were going to totally pulverise the bean anyway, I have to ask: do we really care about damage done to the bean surface??? :P

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Can I darken a roast?

          Originally posted by Viviane link=1211448760/0#3 date=1211452051
          Given that were going to totally pulverise the bean anyway, I have to ask:  do we really care about damage done to the bean surface???  :P
          ;D

          Of course we care...or should. Then again, I suspect your post is tongue in cheek... :-/

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Can I darken a roast?

            Originally posted by rong link=1211448760/0#0 date=1211448760
            ... I wanted to know if it is possible to darken (or further roast) beans once they have been roasted and cooled? Some of the blends I have recently tried are lighter than I would prefer and would like to experiment just darkening the roast.
            No ... wrong, wrong, rong!

            Re-roasting a bean youve already purchased, will simply destroy the bean. Think of the best recent culinary sensation youve had, then imagine microwaving the leftovers the next day - an extremely dodgy comparable sensation :P

            Coffee is a food ... roast it correctly once, but never twice. If you dont like it 1st time, then relegate it to the compost.

            Its not able to be resurrected after that.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Can I darken a roast?

              Thanks for your frank (and tongue-in-cheek) replies.

              It is obviously a sticky point, as I find that after discontinuing my usual blend I havent found one of those remaining which has the distinctive qualities of the original. The chances of discovering the exact content of the blend is close to zero and the time I would require to reproduce it is immense (considering I have never roasted my own).

              So the dilema is whether to chuck the roasters alternative blends on the compost (as I sample others) or DIY and chuck the failures on the compost. Thinking - what is the cheaper option and will I whack my taste buds in the process?

              Probably have to keep drinking mediocre brews until I decide to bite the bullet and spend some cash on a roaster or find a breadmaker

              Ron

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Can I darken a roast?

                The alternative is to broaden your choices there are many suppliers that make many different blends. Some are shown on the left. Every coffee blend is different and you are quite likely to find another that suits your taste. Also try different single origin. In other words you will have to drink more coffee until you find a replacement for your previous favorite. ;D

                Of course home roasting is an alternative but the search for the perfect blend will probably take as long as sampling all the roasted beans available. Your choice but the search will be interesting. I have recently started roasting at home and I am using a popper but planning is underway for a corretto. The popper is a cheap entry point but you have little control over the end product other than when you turn off the popper. You can vary the temp. a little by modifications to the popper and adding fans or by varying the weight of beans you put into it etc. :-/

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Can I darken a roast?

                  Originally posted by cuppacoffee link=1211448760/0#4 date=1211453019
                  Originally posted by Viviane link=1211448760/0#3 date=1211452051
                  Given that were going to totally pulverise the bean anyway, I have to ask:  do we really care about damage done to the bean surface???  :P
                  ;D

                  Of course we care...or should.  Then again, I suspect your post is tongue in cheek... :-/
                  Of course my post was tongue in cheek - I take great care of my beans prior to pulverising them.  Protect them from heat and light, rub each bean with moisturiser before exposing it to the heat gun, etc, etc....

                  Seriously, GoD is right, coffee is a food, and I cant think of any other food that actually benefits from re-cooking. Some "wet" foods (curries, braises) will taste better after reheating the next day, but this is about leaving the whole lot to mingle in the sauce overnight, and is still only reheated, not recooked. Youll find the occasional recipe for twice baked something, in most of these the second baking is only to the point of reheating, and is to make it easier for the chef. The reference in the title is just words, meant to make it sound "fancier".

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Can I darken a roast?

                    I agree with everyone who encourages you to think about starting to roast yourself (erm, not roast yourself, but roast yourself... you know what I mean).

                    However, just a note about re-roasting. I have tried it on stale beans that were a fairly light roast to begin with, well past FC but well short of SC. It did not produce the same flavour profile as a single roast would have, but neither was it disgusting. In fact, it was surprisingly palatable. However, palatable is not exactly the ultimate aim of CS roasters. It was merely a way of resurrecting a stale bean, and for the sake of curiosity. But, as Stan (the Hokusai lover) said, if you start looking around and tasting many different varieties, youll quickly discover a wealth of flavours you never suspected existed, and this will open a wonderful new vista of coffee experience for you. After all, you are a Coffee Snob!

                    matt

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Can I darken a roast?

                      I resemble that remark Domo arigato

                      No I cant speak japanese I know just enough for my recreational use and to buy a beer.

                      I am still working my way through single origin coffee from BrownBay and I thought I would soon be able to expand my horizon and try other sponsors then he added new ones to the mix. It is a fiendish plot by Andy.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Can I darken a roast?

                        Originally posted by GrindOnDemand link=1211448760/0#5 date=1211460719
                        No ... wrong, wrong, rong!

                        Re-roasting a bean youve already purchased, will simply destroy the bean.  Think of the best recent culinary sensation youve had, then imagine microwaving the leftovers the next day - an extremely dodgy comparable sensation :P

                        Coffee is a food ... roast it correctly once, but never twice.  If you dont like it 1st time, then relegate it to the compost.

                        Its not able to be resurrected after that.

                        Hmmm, Ive worked with many well respected chefs who work in very  well respected restuarants who par cook many different types of food with no loss of moisture or taste in the final product (everything from vegetables to steaks).  It is not an uncommon practise at all.

                        Im not sure if this relates to coffee roasting in the slightest, but discounting re-roasting just because coffee is a food is ludacris.  And relating this to microwaving is only relevant if youre roasting your beans with microwaves (now theres an idea!!! )

                        I imagine that if you could pre-roast coffee to a point of no (or at least minimal) moisture loss, youd be safe to continue roasting at a later point in time with little loss in the final product.  Itd be interesting to see if there were a point of roasting to begin releasing some of the CO2 while minimising the release of flavour oils to see how that could impact on the overall flavour.

                        It doesnt seem like anyone (whos posted yet) has any definitive thoughts/results and some trial and error is definately required, Happy Roasting!!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Can I darken a roast?

                          psaigh as soon as you start roasting the beans lose moisture.

                          And I dont think you could compare par boiling a potato with roasting beans.

                          Par cooking vegetables aims at a comletely different outcome.
                          Id be willing to bet they dont par cook a steak.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Can I darken a roast?

                            Certainly at FC caramelisation of the sugars in the beans commence.... this is way beyond loss of moisture (generally beans are held at about 70C if you wish to "dry them out".....)

                            From my forced experiments (thanks Western Power :) you can get away with re-roasting before first crack (I dont know how close...... the closest Ive had a power failure was about 170C.....) but after FC the flavour was completely different after re-roasting------ kind of toasted and flat compared to properly roasted beans.....

                            Although I used "disgusting" when describing the results earlier in this thread..... the resultant espresso was "drinkable" - as drinkable as instant coffee..... so after the first couple of re-roasts of beans beyond FC (which after tasting went into the bin!!) now if I have a power failure beyond FC (but well short of the desired roast level).... they go straight into the bin!!!!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Can I darken a roast?

                              If you google "double roasting coffee" youll find commercial roasters who do it. I dont think they do this so that they can make terrible tasting coffee. Their belief is that it improves the flavours.

                              TG, aside from vegies, pasta, and risotto, steak can be and at times is par-cooked in restaurants.

                              Regarding coffee, commonly accepted practice may be to achieve FC in quick time, then slow ramp to 2C, but what if you tried something different? Has anyone tried a roast to say, 150* and kept it there for 5 minutes then let it cool completely before re-roasting? Or, what if you roasted more quickly and achieved FC at 8.5 minutes instead of 12, then ramped up moderately instead of slowly? Can you speculate as to what the results would be, and how do you come to those conclusions?

                              The point Im making is that there are many variations available. While its fine to stick with whats tried and tested, Id prefer to pursue something better. To do so may require us to depart from custom, either slightly or radically! Who was it that said, think different?

                              In the QLD round of the Roast Off, Jason prepared a quick roast, that seemed to surprise those at the event. Coincidentally, the Kimel I roasted 10 days ago was also the product of quick roasts. Why? Because I wanted to present something different.

                              I guess what Im saying in a long-winded way is, dont be satisfied with the status quo. Take risks - the results may be a pleasant surprise!

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X