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  • Originally posted by LeroyC View Post
    It really depends on a variety of factors. I haven't tried anything too extravagant, but from what I've tried and from what I've read sometimes they can be quite difficult to roast. And yes quite often people do try to roast them a little lighter to ensure the sweetness and acidity isn't muted at all. This obviously does mean that they often only suit soft brew methods (or lever espresso).
    To get the best out of Geisha I always roast them lightly for filter brewing taking them into a very vigorous first crack and then rapidly cooling, high end cafes use the lighter roasts in their pressure profiling machines to produce espresso based drinks. The longer into the roast you go the more the acidity and florals are muted, still an amazing coffee but not what a lot of people are looking for when paying the high end prices for these amazing beans.
    Natural Geisha's need a little bit more TLC than the washed variety which are not too difficult to roast, it's a little daunting first-up though!!!

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    • 120g Costa Rica La Lapa:
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      102g roasted weight / 15% weight loss.

      I'm unsure if i should try pushing the heat a bit more after first crack? I'm getting FC around 192c on the heatsnob, this time I dumped the beans into the cooling tray at about 209, so roughly 4 minutes and 17c from FC.
      Don't think i've hit 2ndC yet on any roasts, from what i can find online it should be around 30c higher than first, so 222 adjusted for my readings, seems like i have a fair bit more room on the upside with temperatures, maybe i'm leveling off the temp too quickly?

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      • Rwanda Buf Remera Gitantu.

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        • LeroyC, do you use tapatalk on your phone, is that how the photos you post come up full size in the thread?

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          • Originally posted by Janus View Post
            LeroyC, do you use tapatalk on your phone, is that how the photos you post come up full size in the thread?
            Yeah I use Tapatalk. When you insert an image into a post Tapatalk asks you if you it full size or reduced size. If you haven't already resized the image sometimes full resolution is too big so I pick the 'medium' resolution in this case. Normally I've already cropped the image and I'm able to choose 'best' to give a good size, high res image. Tapatalk is pretty good for image hosting. It's not perfect as apparently some people that run certain ad blocking software on some browsers can't see the images, but overall it's not bad. Certainly not going to run into any Photobucket type problems.

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            • Originally posted by Janus View Post
              120g Costa Rica La Lapa:
              [ATTACH=CONFIG]16572[/ATTACH]
              [ATTACH=CONFIG]16573[/ATTACH]
              102g roasted weight / 15% weight loss.

              I'm unsure if i should try pushing the heat a bit more after first crack? I'm getting FC around 192c on the heatsnob, this time I dumped the beans into the cooling tray at about 209, so roughly 4 minutes and 17c from FC.
              Don't think i've hit 2ndC yet on any roasts, from what i can find online it should be around 30c higher than first, so 222 adjusted for my readings, seems like i have a fair bit more room on the upside with temperatures, maybe i'm leveling off the temp too quickly?
              That roast looks pretty good to me, it is hard to compare roast temperatures with other peoples roasters and set-ups. I reach the start of first crack at around 198-200C, the start of second crack is usually 16-17C after that, which I very rarely venture that far! You get plenty of smoke nearing second crack, use your sampler to keep an eye on smoke and colour change.

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              • Would it generally be fair to approach coffee' which are known to have their best flavours in the lighter acidic/floral ranges with a more aggressive heat profile first up (assuming consistent sizing), coasting from first crack to wherever you can pull them with a good balance of lower acidity while still retaining the floral aspects? For Coffee' where you're looking for more of the spice/chocolates style in the darker roasts, a bit longer time to FC and easing through to a darker roast?
                Seems to me that higher heat/faster progression to first crack results in a better aroma from the coffee straight off the roaster, unsure if this translates to better flavour in the cup.
                If the beans are not sized, then a slower approach is needed to ensure an even roast, but without sizing to consider, is the above something people with more experience than me would agree with? (i know i'm generalizing).
                Wondering if the picture i'm building from my limited roasting experience with heat and fan control is accurate, i still don't have any idea of how to approach a bean i haven't roasted before, i guess i need to start taking notes on density of beans and this will at least give me an idea of where to start in the range of load temperatures, and how much heat the beans will need.
                Good fun, Zambia Terranova was a nice drop this morning.
                Looking forward to picking up my 10kg Beanbay delivery this arvo. Feel like i have a long way to go before i feel like i'm able to get the most out of the beans, at the moment it's dumb luck either way.
                Last edited by Janus; 25 July 2017, 12:33 PM.

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                • Originally posted by Janus View Post
                  Would it be a fair generally to approach coffee' which are known to have their best flavours in the lighter acidic/floral ranges with a more aggressive heat profile first up (assuming consistent sizing), coasting from first crack to wherever you can pull them with a good balance of lower acidity while still retaining the floral aspects? For Coffee' where you're looking for more of the spice/chocolates style in the darker roasts, a bit longer time to FC and easing through to a darker roast?
                  Seems to me that higher heat/faster progression to first crack results in a better aroma from the coffee straight off the roaster, unsure if this translates to better flavour in the cup.
                  If the beans are not sized, then a slower approach is needed to ensure an even roast, but without sizing to consider, is the above something people with more experience than me would agree with? (i know i'm generalizing).
                  Am also wondering this myself! Is that a good general way to approach roasting?

                  (And in saying that, in relation to a Behmor 1600 original, a P1/P2 for the first style of a more aggressive roast, and P3/P4/P5 for the latter style of slower gentler roast? Still wrapping my head around all this haha... great question!)

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                  • This article from Sweet Marias should help Janus!!
                    "High grown washed Central American coffees are practically the control coffee when it comes to roasting, the coffees that roast just like they should. They take the heat up front, change color evenly, charge into 1st Crack with gusto and with a definitive finish. On top of all that, they are perhaps the most versatile as far as roast level and roast development, with a plenty of exciting and intensely sweet characteristics expressed from City to Full City+. They also have a lot of room to move the characteristics across the palate and create a 3 dimensional profile.

                    The number one fundamental of washed Centrals in my mind is sweetness and the way that you can present the whole range of development of that sweetness. Some washed South American coffees also share this trait and you can include them here, especially Colombians. African coffees can have the vibrant and exotic fruit and floral attributes, and Indonesian and Pulped Natural coffees have the more rustic type of sweetness, but Washed Centrals can be deeply and expressively sweet in a truly remarkable way.

                    Lighter roasts without that much sugar development show more of the malty sweetness, but that malty sweetness can also express itself as graham cracker or wafer cookie. Developing the roast a little more moves you into the intense candy-like sweetness, followed by the more fruited sweetness like that found in cherries and other stone fruits, unique fruitiness from citric and malic fruitiness. Continuing to develop the roast leads to a fruity chocolate sweetness and then mild bitterness from caramelization expresses a more dark cocoa character with some vanilla.

                    This is the sweetness development path of most coffees, but I feel like Washed Centrals showcase this development in the clearest possible way. And of course Washed Centrals can show floral and more exotic fruit notes, but it is this sweetness that is integral. The other side of that coin is balance. In order to best express the sweetness of a Washed Central, you also want to develop the roast so that there is as much balance between the acidity and mouthfeel as possible. That balance best showcases the clarity in a well sorted and processed coffee, which in turn allows the sweetness to be the star of the show. Because the acidity can be so brilliant and crystal clear there is always a temptation to roast the coffee to highlight that, but it can be just as brilliant if the roast is used to highlight and promote sweetness."

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                    • Whats in my coffee roaster this week

                      Thanks Greenman.
                      Just watched a video by a guy Diedrich who's brother makes the roasters, he spent a bit of time in the later part describing how to roast different types of beans to get the best out of them.
                      https://youtu.be/1_puhTRiOgk
                      Lot of waffle to get through to the guts, might want to skip ahead.

                      There's another guy on youtube N3 coffee roasters, who does some good videos getting into the nuts and bolts of how to develop the roast profile.

                      Will keep at it - 10kg of beanbay beans just arrived, looking forward to roasting some Aceh beans this evening.
                      Last edited by Janus; 26 July 2017, 09:18 AM.

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                      • The Zambia terranova i roasted about 5 days ago is probably the most flavorsome coffee i've roasted in the drum to date, has that nice spice and chocolate flavour. Similar to the flavours i've been enjoying at this Indonesian coffee roaster on the way to work.
                        Dumb luck strikes again!

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                        • Whats in my coffee roaster this week

                          Roasted the Aceh and Sulawesi from beanbay tonight. Tried to follow Andy's roasting tips, easy heat on the Aceh, longer roast 11 min to first crack, dropped into cooling tray at 15. Sulawesi more heat up front, think I got what they call "facing" was more apparent prior to bean development, some beans on the flat part looked very dark and mottled, could have been burnt. Dropped them a touch early, was aiming for CS8/9.

                          Proof will be in the cup.

                          Sulawesi:


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                          See how the Sulawesi goes after 4-5 days, reckon i singed them though, and they look pretty uneven. Next time will try 5-10c lower charge temp, and let them absorb some of the drum heat before turning the heat up half way to turnaround.


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                          The Aceh i tried for a slower heat curve to allow the different sizings to equalise as suggested, probably went a bit slow though at 15.5 min roast time and nearly 12 min to first crack (i marked first crack 30-60 seconds late). Note the heatsnob doesn't show accurate air temp, it was 210 on the regular thermometer, the face plate seems to draw a lot of heat when the drum isn't charged with beans for the first roast.
                          Last edited by Janus; 28 July 2017, 11:07 AM.

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                          • Couple of batches yesterday. Had another go on the PNG Ulya A. The first batch a couple of weeks ago was a complete failure as I didn't manage to tame the acidity at all. I slowed the roast down a bit this time, but still achieved the same weight loss so hopefully it's a better result. They look ok anyway.



                            Then I did another batch of Monsoon Malabar, which has come up looking pretty good. I ended up roasting them for a bit longer than the first batch unintentionally so it'll be interesting to see if there's much difference. External appearance and weight loss are virtually the same so I'm not sure what that means. I guess I'll find out in 2-3 weeks! Haha!

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                            • Originally posted by LeroyC View Post
                              Then I did another batch of Monsoon Malabar, which has come up looking pretty good. I ended up roasting them for a bit longer than the first batch unintentionally so it'll be interesting to see if there's much difference. External appearance and weight loss are virtually the same so I'm not sure what that means. I guess I'll find out in 2-3 weeks! Haha!
                              Yeah I've had that sort of result too, roasting with pretty much the exact same variables, profile and cutoff point, yet a different weight loss in the end... I'm wondering what that means too... :S. I guess maybe looking at the weight lost at the end isn't as important as I thought?

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                              • Originally posted by simonsk8r View Post
                                Yeah I've had that sort of result too, roasting with pretty much the exact same variables, profile and cutoff point, yet a different weight loss in the end... I'm wondering what that means too... :S. I guess maybe looking at the weight lost at the end isn't as important as I thought?
                                It's somewhat important, but only to an extent. If you roast two batches of the same coffee back to back following the same profile you should get very close as not much will have changed. But if for example you roast the last batch of something today then in 3 or 4 months time buy another bag from your supplier you're unlikely to achieve the same moisture loss by following the same profile. The main reasons for this will be that the ambient environmental conditions and the moisture content of the green coffee will be different.

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