Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Whats in my coffee roaster this week

Collapse
This is a sticky topic.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Dimal
    replied
    Another batch roasted recently...

    Used a slightly quicker profile and pulled at ~220C then immediately cooled. This has been a lovely combo in the past so looking forward to some brews in a little while.

    Batch details posted below with roast profile and post-roast photos attached, as always.

    Mal.

    Batch Details:
    Ethiopia Gambella Sundried - 450g
    India El.Hills Peaberry - 300g
    Roasted Weight - 630g
    Weight Loss - 16.00%
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • sp0rk
    replied
    Saturday's roast was 280g Ethiopian Djimmah and 270g Tanzanian Kilimanjaro AA
    My first blend, and mostly just to use up the last of my Djimmah and needed something else to make up the rest of the volume
    Right on 10 minutes to the end of FC and dumped at 211c
    Stupidly didn't grab a photo, but there was a bit of uneven roast, I'm thinking I might need to start roasting a little bit longer for this Kilimanjaro (the Djimmah is usually pretty uniform with that length roast for me)

    Leave a comment:


  • greenman
    commented on 's reply
    Backing up Mal's comments, I started pre-blending when I purchased my larger roaster and have been doing so for the last 11 years with very pleasing results,Initially KJM inspired me to use this method.
    cheers Trevor

  • Dimal
    replied
    G'day mate...

    Yes, different bean varietals, when harvested, altitude of the estate where grown and a range of other parameters do effect the development of a profile that will bring out the best results in the cup that a bean has to offer. Those 'best' results though will likely be a bit different from one home-roaster to another so a profile that works great for me, may not suit you and other home-roasters.

    Because I use a fairly large bread-maker (a Breville Big Loaf from many years ago), roasting individual small batches to make up a whole blend is a bit difficult so I pre-blend pretty well every batch I roast. By the use of a fairly gentle roast profile, I am able to get away with pre-blending beans from different regions and varying densities, etc. This works pretty well for us though, even if I may not hit the 'perfect' profile for each bean in the blend, it is usually very darn close to it for the primary bean in the blend which is the main aim.

    The latest few roast batches I've done have provided superb results in the cup, using a variety of brew methods, so happy to keep doing what I'm doing and have been doing for 15 years plus at this time. If you have the option of being able to roast all of your blend components separately using individual profiles and then blending, this would be worthwhile pursuing as an exercise, to see what sort of results you observe in the cup between pre-blending and post-blending your roast batches. You could then report back here on the results you have observed...

    All the best,
    Mal.

    Leave a comment:


  • allinone
    replied
    Originally posted by Dimal View Post
    Roast day again so soon... Batch Details: Yemen Hamasil Village - 450g Brazil Pulped Natural - 300g Roasted Weight - 629g Weight Loss - 16.13%
    So a simple question.... Do different beans have differing roasting profiles?, maybe due to growing conditions, storage conditions and so on.. And if so, how does roasting a blend work, or do you roast separately and then blend the roasted beans? Maybe just some crazy thoughts in my cup. Thanks for any comments.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dimal
    replied
    Roast day again so soon...

    The one problem with having such great coffee on offer means that we go through the roast batches a bit quicker than planned sometimes. Definitely a First World problem if ever there was one.

    Roasted up another batch using the Yemen Hamasil Village as the primary bean blended with Brazil Pulped Natural. This turned out to be a real beaut last time we tried it, so can't wait to try it again when ready.

    Used a medium length roast profile again but took it a little darker and before 2nd-Crack started. Stopped and dumped the beans into the cooler at ~223.0C where once again, the aromas wafting over my way were pretty darn nice.

    Roast batch details are below with the Roast Profile and post-roast photos attached.
    Changed the lighting around a little this time to give a truer representation of the "No-Flash" image.

    Mal.

    Batch Details:
    Yemen Hamasil Village - 450g
    Brazil Pulped Natural - 300g
    Roasted Weight - 629g
    Weight Loss - 16.13%
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • amberale
    commented on 's reply
    I’ve been enjoying both of these beans recently and tried this blend this morning.
    Delightful!
    I’m about to make another to sip with the Guardian Cryptic.
    I roasted some Diablo yesterday and I am looking forward to trying the other blend next week.
    Thanks Dimal

  • Dimal
    commented on 's reply
    Not really a dark roast Leroy, about 3-4 degrees this side of 2nd-Crack.
    Do my best to take photos that look as close as I can to what I see in from of me but I guess the transition from camera to PC and Monitor might realise darker colours on other Monitors.

    FYI though, I use brew temp. of 92C over ~30g of filter ground beans using ~400ml of water in the reservoir...

    Mal.

  • LeroyC
    replied
    I’ve roasted a couple of batches in the Behmor 1600+ over the last few days. First up was the last of my Kenya Gakundu AB. I used exactly the same parameters and followed the same profile as the last toast which turned out really nice. I hit all the marks I was hoping to and came in with a moisture loss of 12.7% so I’m pretty confident it will be good again. And I’m getting low on coffee for my morning cap so I roasted another batch of Brazil Ipanema Estate Gourmet pulp natural. The first batch of this I roasted in April turned out a little under developed, so while I followed a similar profile this time I ensured that I gave it a bit more heat and kept it in the roaster a little longer. The result appears to be on the money and moisture loss is good at 15.1% so hopefully it’s come out better this time.
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • LeroyC
    replied
    Originally posted by Dimal View Post
    Well, this is just a wonderful coffee. Beautiful right to the last bean and gone too quickly... As before loads of tropical fruitiness, sweet acidity and a fantastic lingering finish of a rich dark chocolate. Consumed as espresso and in the Brazen, great from either method... Mal.
    How do you get a good brew of a dark roast like this in the Brazen Mal? Do you use a lower brew temperature and slightly shorter ratio to avoid over extraction?

    Leave a comment:


  • Dimal
    replied
    Since we've just about demolished the previous roast already, had to roast some more beans for the next couple of weeks enjoyment.

    Headed back to Ethiopia once again. Time for some more Shakisso Estate blended with Indonesia Sulawesi Blue.
    Used a similar profile to previous batches of this wonderful bean then dumped and cooled at ~220C.
    As always, aromas from the bean cooler were pretty darn nice.

    Bean blend details appear below along with roast profile and post-roast photos attached.

    Mal.

    Batch Details:
    Ethiopia Shakisso Estate - 450g
    Indonesia Sulawesi Blue - 300g
    Roasted Weight - 632g
    Weight Loss - 15.73%
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • Dimal
    replied
    Batch Details:
    Nicaragua Datanli el Diablo - 450g
    Brazil Pulped Natural - 300g
    Roasted Weight - 632g
    Weight Loss - 15.73%
    Well, this is just a wonderful coffee. Beautiful right to the last bean and gone too quickly...
    As before loads of tropical fruitiness, sweet acidity and a fantastic lingering finish of a rich dark chocolate.
    Consumed as espresso and in the Brazen, great from either method...

    Mal.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dimal
    replied
    Time to think ahead to the next couple of weeks of coffee nirvana...

    Heading back to a simple blend using a previous combo of "Nicaragua Datanli el Diablo" and "Brazil Pulped Natural". The el Diablo is a really fabulous coffee and have just enough left for another couple of batches.
    Used the slightly shorter roast profile with a bit more heat up front and then dropped at ~220C prior to 2nd-Crack starting. The post 1st-Crack gradient was a bit slower than I intended but should still be Ok.

    Wonderful aromas coming off the bean cooler heralds something to really look forward to...

    Blend details below with roast profile and post-roast photos attached.

    Mal.

    Batch Details:
    Nicaragua Datanli el Diablo - 450g
    Brazil Pulped Natural - 300g
    Roasted Weight - 632g
    Weight Loss - 15.73%
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • allinone
    commented on 's reply
    This is tasting good to me, seems around day 8 oils appear to be coming out from the beans. Did another 150g batch today, Ill post the detail a bit later

  • Dimal
    replied
    The above roast is another Yemen beauty for sure. Love both the Yemeni offerings Andy managed to secure...

    Pretty hard to describe this one as there seems to be so much going on but something that comes close to describing it, is a wonderfully rich and sweet fruit cake, that happens to be coffee. Terrific bean...

    Mal.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X