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  • Guide to Roasting...

    Hey guys...

    Forgot to mention in previous posts but one thing that may help some of you with your roasting. You will see posted around the traps that a lot of emphasis is put on 1st crack, what time in happens and how long after before you dump etc etc. This is all important but dont worry too much on the timing of when this happens as it really is just when the beans get to a certain temperature...you can make it happen at all sorts of times, there is no right or wrong way only that it will have an effect on the roast and that you should explore these differences in order to come to your own conclusions. You might hear that 1st crack has to be at this time or within this time etc etc. If you believe this without really understanding it then you are limiting your opportunities for exploration. What is more important is how you got there.

    A lot of emphasis is put on post 1st crack and extending it out but dont under estimate what is happening before 1st crack as this is what leads up to caramalisation and Maillards. Different types of sugars are produced at different temps mostly before the beans have really browned so as I mentioned before this can impact the roast. Remember that they are both reacting with the heat and also that Maillards needs reducing sugars and amino acids to accur and give off those flavours and aromas.

    Just dont like seeing people get too worried about having to hit things in certain time limits as it does freak the new roasters out. Its not that unusual for commercial roasters to have roast times over 30 mins...there is an argument for slower roasting (does not mean baking) so you may find some results you like by extending it out more (not suggestign to this extreme). Coffee beans only have small amounts of moisture (10-12%) so its probably best to go slower at the start before 1st crack before the beans are too dry. If you go to long after 1st crack you might end up with a brittle, light and tasteless bean.

    Originally posted by 6D6A6B7D7D771E0 link=1277375158/67#67 date=1280153396
    So far finding it difficult to stretch time between first crack and second crack in a controlled way, but practice should see this improve.first crack seems to go on for up to 2 minutes leading into second crack (hard to tell this with little experience of this roaster so far).
    Try switching the flame off once a bit into 1st crack and you will slow the process and if you need to speed it up later on just turn it back on. Its only a small chamber so the changes will happen fairly quickly. What you are doing is really good so far. Once the beans are hot enough they will have enough thermal mass to keep climbing by themselves so dont be afraid to switch off the heat at points all together.

    Cheers


  • #2
    Re: Guide to Roasting...

    Copied this excellent information from a post by Mark in "Roasters". Thought it was too good not to pin up here.... 8-)

    Mal.

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    • #3
      Re: Guide to Roasting...

      for How long/ what time it happen to first crack on the bean?
      and What should I do when finish roasting, should I keep it in the refrigerator?

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Guide to Roasting...

        Originally posted by 636F666665656D616C616E67000 link=1280212804/2#2 date=1282568985
        for How long/ what time it happen to first crack on the bean?
        and What should I do when finish roasting, should I keep it in the refrigerator?

        " Depending on the origin of the bean"
        I try to get 1st crack at around 9 minutes to 13 minutes & an extra 6 to 8 minutes to second crack

        Beans need to be cooled quickly after roasting (fan cooling works best)
        Beans also need to be degassed or given a rest time to stabilise the chemical change that has just taken place, this process can take from one day to 10+ days (depending on the bean type)

        Storage of roasted beans I feel is best in mylar coffee bags that have a one way valve fitted
        Then stored in a cool dry cupboard

        Roasted Coffee Beans are a perishable item.
        That means they go stale, for this reason, roasted beans need to be consumed quickly as the optimum flavour is best tasted in a 5 week period and in many bean types  before 3 weeks

        KK

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        • #5
          Re: Guide to Roasting...

          If you are brand new to roasting - can you use a popcorn roaster for your coffee? (Heard it from a friend) And if thats the case how can you prolong the time from first crack to second crack?

          Thanks
          Giff

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          • #6
            Re: Guide to Roasting...

            Originally posted by 7A545B5B040A3D0 link=1280212804/4#4 date=1295313871
            If you are brand new to roasting - can you use a popcorn roaster for your coffee? (Heard it from a friend) And if thats the case how can you prolong the time from first crack to second crack?

            Thanks
            Giff
            Yes you can.

            Theres plenty of different ways; do a search.
            If you get stuck, report back.

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            • #7
              Re: Guide to Roasting...

              [split] [link=http://coffeesnobs.com.au/YaBB.pl?num=1212551544/39#39][splithere][/link][splithere_end]

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              • #8
                Re: Guide to Roasting...

                I am struggling to understand sometimes after I rest my beens for 3 - 6 days the flavour is great doing everything I am hoping for but the crema seems thin.

                Its great for texturing milk based coffees but as an espresso a little short on viscosity.

                Do I need a bit more heat leading up to first crack?

                Am I ramping to much and the inside not heating a rate which highlights the oils enough?

                My blend has 50% nat pulped Brazil, so I am struggling to see my issue.


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                • #9
                  Re: Guide to Roasting...

                  Ive seen guys using chilled cookie sheets to spread the beans out after they shake off the chaff. I hope that would work well too.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Guide to Roasting...

                    Originally posted by 282828282829420 link=1280212804/7#7 date=1329289219
                    I am struggling to understand sometimes after I rest my beens for 3 - 6 days the flavour is great doing everything I am hoping for but the crema seems thin.

                    Its great for texturing milk based coffees but as an espresso a little short on viscosity.

                    Do I need a bit more heat leading up to first crack?

                    Am I ramping to much and the inside not heating a rate which highlights the oils enough?

                    My blend has 50% nat pulped Brazil, so I am struggling to see my issue.

                    Are you certain that it is your coffee and not the extraction that is causing the lack of crema? Otherwise, perhaps whatever youre storing your coffee in is not well sealed and the beans are degassing too rapidly and oxidising? Particularly with brasilian coffees, I think if youre roasting the coffee at all in the ballpark it should produce plenty of crema.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Guide to Roasting...

                      folks, is there a guide for newbys when it comes to roasting, this all looks a bit daunting, 1st crack, 2nd crack and so on is that C1 and C2? see what i mean, i have no idea. what i need is a guide leading to a result, what i am trying to do, what to watch for, hear and smell. cheers, steve

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                      • #12
                        Re: Guide to Roasting...

                        Originally posted by 736A727A717E6D661F0 link=1280212804/10#10 date=1335061377
                        folks, is there a guide for newbys when it comes to roasting, this all looks a bit daunting, 1st crack, 2nd crack and so on is that C1 and C2? see what i mean, i have no idea. what i need is a guide leading to a result, what i am trying to do, what to watch for, hear  and smell.  cheers, steve
                        I daresay there are a number of threads around that go through the process.
                        What YOU are looking for depends on what you are planning to use for your roasting.
                        Usually, poppers are going to reach the point of 1st crack / 2nd crack a bit faster than some other methods.

                        1st crack - sometimes likened to the sound of matchsticks being broken. Happens when... Oh a whole lot of things really, but the simplest answer is "When the bean mass reaches a certain temperature".

                        Rolling 1st crack - when 1st crack is rapid (happening to many beans at once)

                        2nd crack - sometimes likened to the sound of cellophane being rustled. Most of us try to get some time gap between 1st and 2nd. Some of us try not to reach 2nd crack as it might be too dark a roast for a specific bean or personal tastes.

                        Rolling 2nd crack - rapid.

                        Generally speaking, the further you go into rolling 2nd, then the darker and oilier the result will be.

                        When starting out, I think it is good to take a batch deep into 2nd and then do one just on 2nd and compare them through the week.

                        The main thing that YOU are after though is... how does it taste?

                        As for C1 and C2, not sure. Could mean 1st and 2nd crack. We also have a roast colour system that refers to the CoffeeSnobs membership card. It has 12 levels of roast colour on it and many of us will refer to a roast as being CS9 or something like that.

                        Hope this helps, but have a search and see what you can find. Main thing is - jump in and have a go. Thats how most of us got started.

                        Brett.

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                        • #13
                          Re: Guide to Roasting...

                          thanks for your time here Brett, i guess i dont enjoy doing things by halves, i would like to know the theory behind it as well, so i have some homework to do and i clearly look forward to it. also i will wait for my Behmor to arrive, no doubt they have a guide of sorts as well.
                          i will be roasting to suite my taste with PNG as i add milk to the mix, i have found that my pav pro tends to lend itself to PNG

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                          • #14
                            Re: Guide to Roasting...

                            Thanks for the practical tips on this thread.

                            Roasted 300g each of "Special K" and Brisilian Natural this afternoon.

                            Now up to roast #15 Im some thing are starting to make more sense. I managed to stretch FIRST crack out to around the 10 min mark, and SECOND out till about 7 mins later.

                            To slow it down, Im using a lower setting on my TO - 225, and burping at appropriate times. Results seem good, but only time and tasting will tell.

                            Looking toward getting a data logger now...

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                            • #15
                              [QUOTE=tuli;431908perhaps whatever youre storing your coffee in is not well sealed and the beans are degassing too rapidly and oxidising?.[/QUOTE]

                              CAn anyone link me to a thread or article that talks about degassing in more depth ?

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