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Latte, should it be layered??

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  • Latte, should it be layered??

    Hi there, Im new here, I just found this site while googling for coffee making instructions. I have a cafe in a fun centre/indoor playground. I was trained to make coffees a long time ago, like 12 years, but am totally out of practise!

    So a staff member and I are having a debate about the proper way to make a latte. Should it be layered, i.e. froth spooned into cup, then add milk, then slowly pour coffee down the side of the cup so that it sits in between the milk and foam making a 3 layer effect. I do remember being taught this, it was me who told her about pouring the coffee slowly down the side, but in all my life of visiting posh cafes I have never been served a latte that looked like this.

    It seems to me the most common way of serving a latte is to free pour the steamed milk in and then let it settle into foam at the top (I think about 1 cm of foam?). I cant do a rosetta yet but am practising!

    Any thoughts? What is the proper way to make a latte? Do customers expect/like it to be layered?

    Thanks in advance for any help with this one!!!

  • #2
    Re: Latte, should it be layered??

    Originally posted by 56616A65614F040 link=1319341674/0#0 date=1319341674
    Should it be layered, i.e. froth spooned into cup, then add milk, then slowly pour coffee down the side of the cup so that it sits in between the milk and foam making a 3 layer effect.
    God no!

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    • #3
      Re: Latte, should it be layered??

      Originally posted by 7E4B46417569454C4C4F4F2A0 link=1319341674/1#1 date=1319342335
      Originally posted by 56616A65614F040 link=1319341674/0#0 date=1319341674
      Should it be layered, i.e. froth spooned into cup, then add milk, then slowly pour coffee down the side of the cup so that it sits in between the milk and foam making a 3 layer effect.
      God no!
      Thats what you might get in some places in Europe. We got this in France.



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      • #4
        Re: Latte, should it be layered??

        Its the way we used to serve Lattes in our shop almost 10 years ago.

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        • #5
          Re: Latte, should it be layered??

          I made something like that at my barista course but it wasnt called a latte.

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          • #6
            Re: Latte, should it be layered??

            Hi Renae
            Layered, yes, but not multi-layered! Pull the shot into the latte glass, stretch the milk (but not too much, you dont want lattecino!), swirl the shot in the glass so youre not left with a "stain" near the base of the glass, then pour the milk into the middle of the shot. As you said, you should end up with about 1 - 1.5cm of foam. The fun will start when you have to make two, and have them look identical

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            • #7
              Re: Latte, should it be layered??

              I used to layer the latte and thought that was great.
              Now ive gone back to doing traditional lattes, at home and in the professional environment.

              When theres a pile of coffee orders coming in, i dont want to mess with running a shot into a cup then layer it on top of the milk, then froth on top.

              I get better feedback from customers if i just run the shot into the latte glass, free pour in the milk and make a nice simple latte art on top, like an apple, for ladies, a heart or basic tulip.

              Less messing around and in the end, its the flavour in the cup that counts.

              Gary at G

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              • #8
                Re: Latte, should it be layered??

                My 2.2 cents worth...

                Layered drinks (cocktails, coffee, mocktails, whatever) look pretty and interesting but because the taste changes with every mouthful they are rarely great.

                ...and for that reason, in Barista competition they are often points suicide.

                Far better to have well mixed components that taste the same for the length of the cup.

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