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Coffee: difference in taste from day 1 - 7

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  • Coffee: difference in taste from day 1 - 7

    So Ive just tried roasting my first batch, I absolutely burnt them to a crisp! It was a horrible experience, so I tried another batch straight after it, which looked much better.

    I couldnt wait to taste it so Waited about two hours and grinder it up and made some coffee in my moka pot. It tastes ok, not great.

    Im just wondering how the taste will change over the week?
    Obviously 2 hours isnt long enough, how would the taste differ in 3 days?


  • #2
    Re: Coffee: difference in taste from day 1 - 7

    Originally posted by 311610030B050A160315031B11620 link=1338615927/0#0 date=1338615927
    Im just wondering how the taste will change over the week?
    Hi SA
    I find that my roasts hit their peak at about 10-14 days - sorry to be the bearer of grim tidings! So I try to be at least a week in front.

    My advice is to roast a few more batches now playing with your technique and see how they develop over the next fortnight. Frustrating to wait - but worth the effort. Many roasts that taste a bit lifeless at 5 days taste amazing at 14

    Matt

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    • #3
      Re: Coffee: difference in taste from day 1 - 7

      It also depends on the beans. I have some Sumatran lintong that needs at least 10 days, then I find the png and my Indian AA that is nice 2 to 3 days after roast. The beans are just in the process of degassing 2 hours from roast and probably still not very aromatic. Id wait at least 7 hours before tasting if u really cant wait.

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      • #4
        Re: Coffee: difference in taste from day 1 - 7

        When I started roasting, I used 2 days as the minimum aging time after roasting. After two years, I now use 3 days as the minimum aging time. For a few beans, they are better after 4-5 days.

        There is also a difference if you make drip coffee versus espresso. My rule of thumb is that beans for espresso need an extra 2 or 3 days of aging.

        There are NO hard and fast rules. This is all based on your personal preferences. The more you taste the results, the more you know.

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