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Small Home-roasting enterprise. Some questions.

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  • Small Home-roasting enterprise. Some questions.

    Hey guys,

    I live in Tasmania, and absolutely love roasting and consuming coffee! I have been roasting my own beans for about 4 months now, just with an un-altered popcorn popper (1250w) and the whole journey has been amazing.

    Initially my popcorn popper was working great, with some jiggling and stirring I was managing to get even roasts and consistent 1st and 2nd crack timings, however it seems my popper is on its last legs. I have noticed recently that the beans do not actually reach 1st crack (even after 9 mins of roasting) like they should, and are quite un-even and often are burnt on one side of the bean and not on the other.

    When the popper was working well, I had plenty of time to play around with different beans and stumbled upon a great combination/blend! Naturally, I shared this with my friends family etc. and they have rather taken off! I now have plenty of people wanting my blend on a regular basis and have recently purchased 10kg of the green beans needed to create the blend, and will be purchasing more weekly.

    My main concerns at the moment are that;
    A) My old popper could only roast approx. 100g of beans per roast and size is beginning to really matter.
    B) I need a machine that can deliver a more consistent roast quality.
    C) Its really hard to find (for obvious reasons) some more definitive information on which DIY roasters are superior etc.

    I have been searching this and others forums for quite some time on alternate roasters and have really been having some trouble isolating which would best suit my particular circumstance . At the moment I don't know whether I should perhaps buy 5 poppers and mod them, buy a bread maker and mod that or just go and purchase a Behmor 1600. My reason for putting this on the forums I guess is that it would be great if I could get some advice from all the other roasters in the community on which roasters I should consider and other such resources

    Any advice would be uber-helpful and massively appreciated!

    Matt

  • #2
    What are your prerequisites? I'd hardly think buying 5 poppers should be an option and it's not even economical. From the 5 popper mention I am guessing you are aiming for 500gm at a time? A corretto setup would easily roast that and more, and provide a reasonable amount of control on the roast depending on your setup. The Behmor is obviously made to roast coffee beans so you can't go wrong with that, max amount of beans roast at a time is 500gms.

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    • #3
      Thanks for the quick reply saoye!

      500gm per roast would work well. Is there a resource of some sort I could be directed to for setting up a corretto? Also in regards to that, what price would you be looking at approximately?

      Again thanks for the help!

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      • #4
        This thread has lots of good pics:
        http://coffeesnobs.com.au/home-roast...lots-pics.html
        Or just search for corretto...

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        • #5
          Photo Album - Imgur

          Prices I paid on the top picture. I do about 500g per roast. 1/2hr setup/roast/packup.

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          • #6
            Thanks for the links to images guys! setup looks really good and roast nice and even. I think I will definitively go for the corretto!

            If anyone knows of a really good building guide, by all means post it!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Sixthlaw View Post
              Thanks for the links to images guys! setup looks really good and roast nice and even. I think I will definitively go for the corretto!

              If anyone knows of a really good building guide, by all means post it!
              The Corretto Roaster was originated in this forum by someone with the Avatar "Corretto" hence the name. She still pops by this forum every now and again.
              The Main components are:

              1. Bread maker ($5 upwards second hand)
              2. heat Gun ($35 upwards)
              3. Some method to hold the heat gun in place over the bread maker (look around the house)
              4. A household fan to blow away the chaff ($10)
              5. A quick cooling system (can be as easy as what you currently do with your popper)

              So you could set something up as cheap as $50 or less if you already own some of the equipments.
              As a guide, my entire setup including the trolley, new heat gun and an exhaust fan bucket system was about $150. The cooling system was the most expensive of the lot costing me about $60.
              If you haven't already got one, I would add the data logger purchased here from beanbay for $79 highly recommended for repeatability of any roast profile you may have saved.

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              • #8
                Thanks for the information Saoye! You have been more than helpful!

                I went searching for all the goodies I needed today, and got a KBM300 for the bread maker ($30 at salvos - checked everywhere else) and got a 2000W OZITO heat gun with adjustable temperature for $35. I am just about to go out into the shed and chuck up my contraption! Also I found a mutimeter out there, can this be used to monitor and record the temperatures?? Would be great not having to buy a logger.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Sixthlaw View Post
                  Thanks for the information Saoye! You have been more than helpful!

                  I went searching for all the goodies I needed today, and got a KBM300 for the bread maker ($30 at salvos - checked everywhere else) and got a 2000W OZITO heat gun with adjustable temperature for $35. I am just about to go out into the shed and chuck up my contraption! Also I found a mutimeter out there, can this be used to monitor and record the temperatures?? Would be great not having to buy a logger.
                  Pretty sure it can. Or does it need a specific "temp" setting. I know mine does. You will need a thermocouple though, I'd recommend the stainless one from beanbay, as the fabric (cotton??) braiding on the stock frays very easily at the heat it's exposed to.

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                  • #10
                    I am currently running my KBM300 and the Dough cycle after 3 minutes begins stirring in 1 minutes stints - stops for 3 seconds - then starts again.. this could be problematic as some beans would be roasted more than others... Any advice?

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                    • #11
                      I hope your right David that would be great! Ill look into getting one of those, might even check out in the shed first.

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                      • #12
                        So I have tried all the settings out with the KBM 300 and none of them have a continuous knead function... would It be easy to re-wire the power straight to the motor? I have a friend who is an electrician, if not let me no and Ill get a return...

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                        • #13
                          Small Home-roasting enterprise. Some questions.

                          Originally posted by Sixthlaw View Post
                          So I have tried all the settings out with the KBM 300 and none of them have a continuous knead function... would It be easy to re-wire the power straight to the motor? I have a friend who is an electrician, if not let me no and Ill get a return...
                          I'm not an electrician. But I know people have rewired the motor. So I doubt it would be too hard...

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Sixthlaw View Post
                            So I have tried all the settings out with the KBM 300 and none of them have a continuous knead function... would It be easy to re-wire the power straight to the motor? I have a friend who is an electrician, if not let me no and Ill get a return...
                            My $5 breadmaker has a 5 minute setting that does intermittent, after the initial 5 minutes it goes on continuous. A word of warning, you may overheat the breadmaker from the heat gun if doing consecutive roasts unless you do something about the safety cut-off that might be in the breadmaker...alternatively adequate insulation in the correct areas might avoid this. I lost a batch because the breadmaker stopped halfway through a roast. I've insulated around the motor at the bottom of the bowl and it seems to have fixed that issue. Others have moved that sensor to another area.

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                            • #15
                              Most breadmakers can be rewired to stir continuously and to remove the overheat protection. Unless you are 100% sure you can do it get your sparky mate to help you out. Safety first!

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