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Roasting green beans at home - my first and second time.

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  • Roasting green beans at home - my first and second time.

    I roasted some Guatemala Huehuetenango beans 4 days ago and today I roasted a Brazil Daterra Sweet bean. About 2 hours after the Brazil roast, we tried both beans (separately of course) in a freshly ground coffee, an espresso for one and a piccolo for the other.
    My question is, why is it best to wait about 4-8 days before we are supposed to drink the freshly roasted beans? We found both beans (the Guatemala roasted 4 days ago) and the Brazilian (roasted today) were both okay and drinkable. The Guatemala coffee was smoother and the Brazillian tasted bolder.
    Any input on this question, as its my first time to ever roast, however I've been making coffees since 2006.

  • #2
    Glad to hear you got stuck into roasting. Keep it up and enjoy.

    As for why wait I'll leave that to the more experienced guys.

    Dan

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    • #3
      Thanks for the encouragement, my next batch will be some robusta to mix with the other roasts. I must say too that have you been "light headed" after drinking a freshly roasted and freshly ground coffee? My head was spinning.

      Comment


      • #4
        Hi grindmobile
        It's not like well roasted high quality beans will ever taste bad at any stage post roast - but they will hit a sweet spot at some point as they take a few days to degas (get rid of the CO2). But try for yourself! Roast 300g, try an espresso each day for week - you'll know what the resting fuss is all about soon enough!
        Personally I roast to rest for at least 7 days before I need it - and I find the sweet spot is about 9-10 days, depending on the type of bean.
        But so good to hear you already like your home roasted efforts!
        Matt

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        • #5
          Welcome to CS grindmobile!

          We want your home roasts to be better than 'ok and drinkable' !! 8-)
          Post roast resting is an interesting phenomenon alright. DzxC is right, it's a good idea to roast a batch or two and track the coffee over a two week period. Looks like there is more anecdotal observation rather than science about what happens during this period but my palate tells me that body develops and flavour emerges. Balance between sugar and acid also becomes evident as well as complexity.

          If you look in the 'Cupping Room' threads you'll get some idea of what people experience with different beans as rest periods are often mentioned. Look up 'Uru Estate' or 'Yemen Bani Ismail' and others.

          It's also interesting to note the differences between dry process Ethiopians and Central Americans (for example) and how rest times can differ.
          Some beans also seem to show a spectrum of flavours over a period of time. All the more reason to roast; you can identify when a bean/roast is ready for your particular taste and you can experience more than one dimension!

          There's nothing like having ripe red fruits on day 6, plus spice on day 8 and then a chocolate explosion added on day 10 !! 8-)

          Comment


          • #6
            Wow, thanks so much for both of your valued experiences. I roasted again this morning and have come up with a new problem more than once now.
            When I get the Behmor 1600 booklet out it mentions P1, P2 etc and "hard bean", "soft bean/low grown", "soft bean or espreso blends" and "Hawaiian, Jamaican etc/Island coffees-City/City+". Now if I buy the Guatemalan H bean how do I know if it is a soft or hard bean or low grown etc? If it has the country of origin, I get a clue but if its just "Robusta" I don't know how to tell if it is a hardie or a softie.
            Your experienced input please.


            PS I'm going to do a roasting course this week, hopefully this will enlighten me.

            GM
            Last edited by grindmobile; 20 January 2013, 02:38 PM. Reason: Forgot to mention ...

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            • #7
              There is a classification system, of sorts, which will help you.
              Anything marked with the following are (generally) Centrals and hard beans:
              SHB......... Strictly Hard Bean
              HB........... Hard Bean
              HG........... High Grown (will be hard bean)

              As a general rule beans over (approx) 1000 m ASL will be harder beans, increasing in hardness as altitude increases,
              with degrees of softening as altitude decreases.
              For the most part 'island beans', Pacific islands, Australia etc will be relatively 'soft'.
              Some roasters won't buy beans grown less than 1200 m ASL, with the exception of Brazils, which might come down
              to as low as 900 m ASL.

              Don't equate altitude with any necessarily inherent quality, plenty of poor coffee comes from high altitude areas.

              Small, dense beans from Ethiopia, Yemen and some other African countries are hard bean by nature of the climate
              and altitude but don't carry a hard bean classification.

              Not all Robusta will be soft, a Ugandan robusta, grown at high altitude, will be harder than a
              Vietnamese robusta, grown at a much lower altitude.
              Indonesian coffee, especially from Sumatra, are more medium in density. Monsooned beans are 'softer'.

              You can generally google the farm or washing station names to get an idea of their height ASL.
              The vast majority of Arabica beans on the market are hard beans and some commercial roasters and importers use
              equipment that will measure bean density and moisture and will be a source of reference.

              Ask questions, enjoy the journey.

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              • #8
                I have a lot to learn. Thank you again for your info and expertise. Most grateful.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by chokkidog View Post
                  There's nothing like having ripe red fruits on day 6, plus spice on day 8 and then a chocolate explosion added on day 10 !! 8-)
                  (ripe red fruits) What exactly does this mean, apples, plums, strawberries, raspberries, cherries, blood orange, cranberries, pomegranates, red grapes, rhubarb, watermelon or something else?

                  Even more so with (spice) there are literally hundreds of them.

                  Chocolate I can understand, although not sure about the explosion part, I've certainly experienced intense chocolate flavours, and very nice they are too, however have yet to experience anything exploding in my mouth and hope to keep it that way.

                  Coffee nerds seem to have learned quickly from the verbal excesses of wine writers, in some cases they even surpass them.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Yelta View Post
                    (ripe red fruits) What exactly does this mean, apples, plums, strawberries, raspberries, cherries, blood orange, cranberries, pomegranates, red grapes, rhubarb, watermelon or something else?

                    Even more so with (spice) there are literally hundreds of them.

                    Chocolate I can understand, although not sure about the explosion part, I've certainly experienced intense chocolate flavours, and very nice they are too, however have yet to experience anything exploding in my mouth and hope to keep it that way.

                    Coffee nerds seem to have learned quickly from the verbal excesses of wine writers, in some cases they even surpass them.
                    Second you there :-)
                    Maybe the subtleties come out more in traditional cupping - but my flavours seem to be based around chocolate, caramel, berries, lifeless, sour & burnt! Maybe I'm just a cretin!
                    Matt

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by DesigningByCoffee View Post
                      Maybe I'm just a cretin!
                      Matt
                      Guess that makes two of us.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Yelta View Post
                        (ripe red fruits) What exactly does this mean, apples, plums, strawberries, raspberries, cherries, blood orange, cranberries, pomegranates, red grapes, rhubarb, watermelon or something else?

                        Even more so with (spice) there are literally hundreds of them.

                        Chocolate I can understand, although not sure about the explosion part, I've certainly experienced intense chocolate flavours, and very nice they are too, however have yet to experience anything exploding in my mouth and hope to keep it that way.

                        Coffee nerds seem to have learned quickly from the verbal excesses of wine writers, in some cases they even surpass them.
                        Thanks for that Yelta, after 20 years in the wine industry, tasting, tasting tasting, my palate is pretty good, better than most,
                        my vocabulary even better than my palate and my desire to convey excitement about coffee exceeds both.
                        (even produced a wine judged to "best single vineyard wine' in the country, at the time).
                        What gives me the #$@#@ is people who have to drag everyone else down to
                        common denominator level just to make themselves feel good about their own shortcomings.
                        As well as people who sit at their computer and lob insults at people they know little about.

                        I hope you're not one of them. "Roll eyes"

                        Did you ever have a properly roasted Uru Estate on day 10?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by chokkidog View Post
                          Thanks for that Yelta, after 20 years in the wine industry, tasting, tasting tasting, my palate is pretty good, better than most,
                          my vocabulary even better than my palate and my desire to convey excitement about coffee exceeds both.
                          (even produced a wine judged to "best single vineyard wine' in the country, at the time).
                          What gives me the #$@#@ is people who have to drag everyone else down to
                          common denominator level just to make themselves feel good about their own shortcomings.
                          As well as people who sit at their computer and lob insults at people they know little about.

                          I hope you're not one of them. "Roll eyes"

                          Did you ever have a properly roasted Uru Estate on day 10?
                          Ahhh, looks like I nailed it in one re the vocabulary

                          Nope not one of em, I'm a bit of a wine snob as well and have always maintained wine writers are full of it, I see the same in the coffee industry now, some of the descriptors are nonsensical.

                          Will leave "Uru Estate on day 10" for you to enjoy

                          Ooroo,

                          Yelta.

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                          • #14
                            yadayadayada
                            So, you've never tasted blueberry in an Ethiopian or Yemen?
                            Strawberries in a light roast Yirg?
                            Red apple skin in a Guatamelan Peurto Verde?
                            Or blackcurrant in a filter roasted Kenyan?
                            Maybe cherry in a Brazil Pedra Redonda or Rwandan Gisenyi?
                            Never experienced juiciness against astringency?
                            Nuttiness against fruitiness?


                            Reading some old Cupping Room threads/posts over the last few minutes suggests more
                            than just a few things about the position you are taking.
                            I simply wanted to convey passion and interest with a non-specific, generic and simplified statement.
                            If thats the charge by judge jury and executioner then I plead guilty 10 times over
                            and with no remorse.

                            I'm no wine writer so, by your own admission, you missed the mark.

                            Chokkidog, over it and out of it.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by chokkidog View Post
                              yadayadayada
                              So, you've never tasted blueberry in an Ethiopian or Yemen?
                              Strawberries in a light roast Yirg?
                              Red apple skin in a Guatamelan Peurto Verde?
                              Or blackcurrant in a filter roasted Kenyan?
                              Maybe cherry in a Brazil Pedra Redonda or Rwandan Gisenyi?
                              Never experienced juiciness against astringency?
                              Nuttiness against fruitiness?


                              Reading some old Cupping Room threads/posts over the last few minutes suggests more
                              than just a few things about the position you are taking.
                              I simply wanted to convey passion and interest with a non-specific, generic and simplified statement.
                              If thats the charge by judge jury and executioner then I plead guilty 10 times over
                              and with no remorse.

                              I'm no wine writer so, by your own admission, you missed the mark.

                              Chokkidog, over it and out of it.


                              Whoa, is it just me or has the temp just jumped!

                              Just to tone it down a bit and ask a serious question out of interest, Chokkidog - I've always wondered where a lot of the flavour descriptors come from.
                              Is there a particular brew technique used that gives the most variations? From what I've read, traditional cupping with light roasted beans seems to give a wider range of those subtle flavours - has that been our experience? My comment was really just that straight espresso or in milk doesn't seem to give as much variety. I've certainly been getting lots of berries (even through soy!) with the Harrar, and Uru at 10 days is a choc monster.
                              Just still looking for leather and tobbaco!

                              Cheers
                              Matt

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