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Comparing behmor-roasted beans to commercially roasted beans

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  • Comparing behmor-roasted beans to commercially roasted beans

    Having read many topics on the behmor, corretto, etc I'm tempted to try home roasting. But I'm unsure on what kind of quality roast I'd get.

    With the Behmor and Bean Bay beans, after a normal bit of trial and error, how would the roasts compare to the beans I currently get from the better roasters here in Melbourne, including of course Talk Coffee, as well as Padre, Axil, etc.

    Home roasting appeals to me on a few fronts, but I fear that if I don't get decent results after a few weeks of practice then I'd just go back to the quality roasters I'm lucky to live near.

    Incidentally, cost isn't a big deal, $400 shipped for the behmor with 2.5kg beans from Andy seems like a good price, and I'm sure I'd get most of that price back if I sold it within a couple of months, so I'm not bothered by the cost, or for that matter the savings, it's all about what the quality will be like?

  • #2
    Originally posted by Jonathon View Post
    but I fear that if I don't get decent results after a few weeks of practice then I'd just go back to the quality roasters I'm lucky to live near.
    Instant gratification much?

    Not having a go but seriously, do not bother then. You cant expect to master something with so many variables and tricks in a couple of weeks.
    Roasting is a a craft / art / science. If you cant enjoy the journey of learning about all the intricacies and chasing the next great / different roast then keep buying roasted.

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    • #3
      I found after purchasing my Behmor pre christmas that after 7 - 10 roasts I've got the hang of it now and I'm quite confident I can get a quality roast for the basic settings. I've mastered the basic settings, now the next step is to try other profiles and just roast for my own acquired taste.

      If your going to give up that easy, it's probably not the best investment. Although your 100% right, you'll purchase it for $400 with beans and you will easily sell it for $300 here, so all in all to loose $100 is what you would spend on a couple months of beans

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Jonathon View Post
        Having read many topics on the behmor, corretto, etc I'm tempted to try home roasting. But I'm unsure on what kind of quality roast I'd get.

        With the Behmor and Bean Bay beans, after a normal bit of trial and error, how would the roasts compare to the beans I currently get from the better roasters here in Melbourne, including of course Talk Coffee, as well as Padre, Axil, etc.

        Home roasting appeals to me on a few fronts, but I fear that if I don't get decent results after a few weeks of practice then I'd just go back to the quality roasters I'm lucky to live near.

        Incidentally, cost isn't a big deal, $400 shipped for the behmor with 2.5kg beans from Andy seems like a good price, and I'm sure I'd get most of that price back if I sold it within a couple of months, so I'm not bothered by the cost, or for that matter the savings, it's all about what the quality will be like?
        I dont know how to explain this but all i will say if you think you have an interest in trying home roasting, well do it. When you do im pretty sure you will look back at the original post and answer your own question. Sure you are going to have a learning curve in there and not every roast is going to turn out how you want it and even sometimes question why am i doing this. I remember my first roast i did in a popper, i loved it and thought this couldnt get any better. Looking back now that first roast would come close to how i do it now.
        All i can say is give it ago, nothing against commercial roasters and buying it from them but its nice to be able to do it your self and once you have learnt the ropes you can change things like roast depth and blend beans post or pre roast. Its alot of fun and i guess im trying to say is give it ago. Its well worth while.

        Regards,

        Chris

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        • #5
          I roast with a corretto - and agree with Steve. It's taken my 18 months to really get polished, repeatable results (with lots of amazing through to mediocre results in that time though!) - but now I'm there, it's brilliant. If you enjoy the challenge and the process - then get into it! Haven't used a behmor, but even with my hit and miss training period - the results have always been pretty good - more than drinkable, and a lot better store bought often, depending on your roaster. And now that they're good - wow!
          And you're right - with a behmor (more than a DIY corretto) you can always flog it off if its not for you :-)

          Give it a go!
          Matt

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          • #6
            Comparing behmor-roasted beans to commercially roasted beans

            Ok I'm convinced, thanks guys.

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            • #7
              The Behmoor is so easy, even a child could do it.

              In fact, young Master Zed took out the Gold Medal at the Golden Bean home roasters section late last year.

              I'll give you another clue.. There's a whole heap of people home roasting. We're not doing it to turn out second rate coffee.

              Yes it's cheaper, maybe. But that's not the point. Once you take away the commercial imperative (make a profit and compete in the marketplace), producing coffee as good as or better than can be bought, anywhere, at any price, is not that difficult.

              Amanda

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              • #8
                The nice thing about lots of the beans from beanbay is that they are very high quality and most taste good through a range of roast depths. Commercial roasters give more control and allow you to zero in more on specific taste profiles. My experience is that with my Gene cafe roaster I get great results if I keep my roasting profile simple and let the machines "native" or inherent temperature curve do its thing the main decision I need to make is how dark to go. If I were trying to use problem coffees this might be a bit harder as it would be harder to hide defects via profiling. The other thing is that unlike a commercial roasting operation that can develop their profiles to give a signature style across all their beans, with home roasters your style will be more limited to the one imparted by your roaster.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Jonathon View Post
                  Having read many topics on the behmor, corretto, etc I'm tempted to try home roasting. But I'm unsure on what kind of quality roast I'd get.

                  Home roasting appeals to me on a few fronts, but I fear that if I don't get decent results after a few weeks of practice then I'd just go back to the quality roasters I'm lucky to live near.
                  Roasting is part pragmatic (very large part for me - very little good fresh beans where I live) and part just fun. Pragmatism aside, my attitude would be to at least occasionally (e.g. when buying a new kind of green bean, or when trying a new blend) keep buying roasts from quality roasters, just to study and learn.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Its all been thrashed out before with many pro's and con's.
                    Enjoy the ride and sooner or later you are going to be really pleased with the results. I have 2 mates that supply me with coffee from Behmors and another via corretto and I buy from Supreme here in NZ. To say ones better than the other just isn't comparing apples to apples.
                    I cannot even remember how many different roasting set-ups I have used including commercial and some of the results were rubbish but most good but theres something cool about roasting your own

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Jonathon View Post
                      Having read many topics on the behmor, corretto, etc I'm tempted to try home roasting. But I'm unsure on what kind of quality roast I'd get.

                      With the Behmor and Bean Bay beans, after a normal bit of trial and error, how would the roasts compare to the beans I currently get from the better roasters here in Melbourne, including of course Talk Coffee, as well as Padre, Axil, etc.

                      Home roasting appeals to me on a few fronts, but I fear that if I don't get decent results after a few weeks of practice then I'd just go back to the quality roasters I'm lucky to live near.

                      Incidentally, cost isn't a big deal, $400 shipped for the behmor with 2.5kg beans from Andy seems like a good price, and I'm sure I'd get most of that price back if I sold it within a couple of months, so I'm not bothered by the cost, or for that matter the savings, it's all about what the quality will be like?
                      My Behmor arrived from Andy last week. First roast was a dud, I mixed up the cracks, but the second and third roasts looked great.

                      Then I tasted the second roast last night, it was awesome!

                      So to answer my original question, yes a Behmor really can produce roasts on a par with top quality commercial roasters, and that's just my second batch, and just 3 days after roasting...I can only imagine how good it'll be once I get the hang of it!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Glad to see you took the plunge - have fun! :-)

                        Matt

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                        • #13
                          I took the plunge recently, went through the bag of supplied Peru and after first few duds (also probably due to the conditioning of the machine), I can get consistent results from this bean. I think it is worth keeping a diary, once you like the taste, keep it going. I am so hooked I ordered another 10 kilos of coffee. What I like about the process it the price, not so much to save money, but to pay for the experiments, also won't feel that bad if I waste a batch (like I did with my "first crack" at Ethiopian). Also, variety is good, many more options to buy and try than pretty much all local roasters combined.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by jabbba View Post
                            What I like about the process it the price, not so much to save money, but to pay for the experiments, .
                            Good point. I love that I can play around with a few hundred grams when trying different grinds, doses, etc without feeling like I'm wasting too much money.

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                            • #15
                              I am new to roasting, started with a couple of cheap poppers, thought that was pretty good and quite straightforward, and only small batches, so you can experiment and get the general feel for the process easily. The results were most certainly drinkable and enjoyable. This was a good stepping point for me to a coretto set up, which I must say I think is really excellent if you are practically minded and handed. With a digitally controlled heat gun, a fan, a $12 bread machine, a $39 multimeter with temp probe, and a couple of hours of modifications, this is really a very controllable and easy to use system. A diary profile of each roast soon shows up the patterns of heat input/roast weight and roast time. Experimentation with depth of roast and recognition of 1st and 2nd crack, colour and smell has all come really easily to me, and I am quite sure my pallet has developed in less than a month quite considerably. It really does open up a whole new aspect of coffee enjoyment. i have roasted as small as 150 gms and up to 600, just alter the heat input, monitor the temp rise per minute and adjust along the way, and its all good. I have just also roasted my first batch of hand picked coffee, from the bush, and in a day or so to the cup) Loads of fun and very educational experience!! I highly recommend the experience. I imagine a Behmor roaster would take out some of the need for practical skills in putting a roaster together and my be a good way to do for many)

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