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If you roast your own Torrefacto, I'd love to hear from you and buy some... SA Buyer

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  • If you roast your own Torrefacto, I'd love to hear from you and buy some... SA Buyer

    Hi guys! I'm currently drooling over the idea of Torrefacto coffee, and, having no experience or equipment to roast my own, thought I'd put the word out to Snob-land. I'm in Adelaide and would be fine to pick up a batch of Torrefacto roasted coffee from you, or pay via paypal for it inc postage if you are interstate... if anyone knows of specialty roasters who do this professionally I'd love to hear from you about them too!

    As it usually gets mixed in with a basic blend at about 30% I wouldn't want any more than 300-500g to try at the start.

    I'd also love to hear from any Adelaide roasters who barter or sell their roasts... if you're proud of your technique and want to work with me I barter all kinds of stuff. (Sometimes even wine... why not have one habit pay for another?) Pm me or post here if you want to chat!


    Regards,
    Zennan.

  • #2
    Originally posted by zennanj View Post
    Hi guys! I'm currently drooling over the idea of Torrefacto coffee, and, having no experience or equipment to roast my own, thought I'd put the word out to Snob-land. I'm in Adelaide and would be fine to pick up a batch of Torrefacto roasted coffee from you, or pay via paypal for it inc postage if you are interstate... if anyone knows of specialty roasters who do this professionally I'd love to hear from you about them too!

    As it usually gets mixed in with a basic blend at about 30% I wouldn't want any more than 300-500g to try at the start.

    I'd also love to hear from any Adelaide roasters who barter or sell their roasts... if you're proud of your technique and want to work with me I barter all kinds of stuff. (Sometimes even wine... why not have one habit pay for another?) Pm me or post here if you want to chat!


    Regards,
    Zennan.
    Hmmm, Torrefacto, new term to me, so Googled it and came up with this Torrefacto - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    "Torrefacto refers to a particular process of roasting coffee beans, common in Spain, France, Portugal, Costa Rica and Argentina. The process involves adding a certain amount of sugar during roasting in order to glaze the beans. The glazed beans are then mixed with normal roasted beans. Whilst originally a cheap way of adding weight to the beans, a suggested reason for continued use the technique has been maintenance of the aroma and taste of the coffee. In fact the opposite is probably true and the process sharply increases the acidity and bitter taste of the coffee. The process is not followed in the rest of the coffee world."

    I would be less than enthusiastic about grinding sugar coated beans in my Mazzer Mini, I can imagine the clean up process after the event.

    Comment


    • #3
      Hi there, Yelta!

      Thanks for the info and research, you have highlighted a common misconception regarding Torrefacto beans... the trouble with these sugar infused beans is at the roaster end, but not as much as you'd think if done with skill and a little experience. The problems come from stopping the batch too early once sugar is added, and getting weights correct when measuring out sugar and beans.

      In order for the beans to leave sugar in your grinder or cause issues there, you would need the grinder to heat the beans up to sugar melting point while grinding. Anything short of that temp is fine, sugar wise. I'm not sure I agree with the last bit in the wiki info... too many people rave about it once they've tried it, and most of my research indicated that the bitterness level is very low, but not sure of the acidity.

      Anyway, the very fact that I have never tried it and don't know personally gets me curious, I would love to see for myself! If the grinder does have a clogging issue, well, it won't be the first time I stripped a grinder. I hope to post an update with personal experience asap after I find a roaster that can do it... I'll let you know. Plus, if wiki is right, all that humble pie I'll be chewing on might taste better with sugar coated coffee!

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by zennanj View Post
        Hi there, Yelta!

        Thanks for the info and research, you have highlighted a common misconception regarding Torrefacto beans... the trouble with these sugar infused beans is at the roaster end, but not as much as you'd think if done with skill and a little experience. The problems come from stopping the batch too early once sugar is added, and getting weights correct when measuring out sugar and beans.

        In order for the beans to leave sugar in your grinder or cause issues there, you would need the grinder to heat the beans up to sugar melting point while grinding. Anything short of that temp is fine, sugar wise. I'm not sure I agree with the last bit in the wiki info... too many people rave about it once they've tried it, and most of my research indicated that the bitterness level is very low, but not sure of the acidity.

        Anyway, the very fact that I have never tried it and don't know personally gets me curious, I would love to see for myself! If the grinder does have a clogging issue, well, it won't be the first time I stripped a grinder. I hope to post an update with personal experience asap after I find a roaster that can do it... I'll let you know. Plus, if wiki is right, all that humble pie I'll be chewing on might taste better with sugar coated coffee!
        Evening Zennan,

        I contemplated the roasting process using sugar, at what stage is it added, too early and the temperatures required to roast coffee would burn the sugar, is it added in granular form or as a syrup, the beans would have to be well cooled before removing from the roaster or they would come out as a sticky mass.
        It can be done obviously, however I imagine would require quite a bit of experimentation to get the desired result, I'm not sure any commercial Aussie roaster would want to add sugar in any form to a commercial machine, reckon you would need a roaster dedicated to that particular process.

        Heat isn't the only thing that causes sugar to liquify and make a mess, moisture will obviously do it as well as oil, both are present in roasted beans, I strip and clean my grinder every few months as a matter of course, it's a simple but fiddly job, made a lot easier with the judicious use of compressed air, I suspect it would take a little more than air to remove any stuck on sugar deposits.

        After reading your post I thought about trial roasting a batch in my Coretto, then I thought about not getting it right the first time, meaning multiple attempts in an effort to master the process, then I contemplated all of that sticky sugar coating my roasting gear and the work involved in cleaning it up at that stage I put the whole idea in the too hard basket.

        Good luck with your quest, let's know how you get on.

        Comment


        • #5
          I use a perforated drum with electric elements below. There would be smoke......and where there's smoke....

          Comment


          • #6
            Home Roasting in the Corretto and making Torrefacto. | BritishCoffeeScene

            The above link is what got me started thinking maybe others in Aus would have tried it... can't think of a better way to ask the coffee community than CS... hope his info comes thru for you, if the link won't work I may cut and paste the entire thing. Would love to smell it roasting...

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by zennanj View Post
              Home Roasting in the Corretto and making Torrefacto. | BritishCoffeeScene

              The above link is what got me started thinking maybe others in Aus would have tried it... can't think of a better way to ask the coffee community than CS... hope his info comes thru for you, if the link won't work I may cut and paste the entire thing. Would love to smell it roasting...
              Yep the link works fine, interesting read, lot's of warnings, seems the fears I expressed were justified.

              Comment


              • #8
                Yes, seems worthy of worry on a few points. I'm still not sure that there would be drastic differences in grinder cleaning needs, but it'll be worth it to satisfy my curiosity if it is needed... hope I can report back with some success later! Catch you then. Z.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by zennanj View Post
                  Hi guys! I'm currently drooling over the idea of Torrefacto coffee, and, having no experience or equipment to roast my own, thought I'd put the word out to Snob-land. I'm in Adelaide and would be fine to pick up a batch of Torrefacto roasted coffee from you, or pay via paypal for it inc postage if you are interstate... if anyone knows of specialty roasters who do this professionally I'd love to hear from you about them too!

                  As it usually gets mixed in with a basic blend at about 30% I wouldn't want any more than 300-500g to try at the start.

                  I'd also love to hear from any Adelaide roasters who barter or sell their roasts... if you're proud of your technique and want to work with me I barter all kinds of stuff. (Sometimes even wine... why not have one habit pay for another?) Pm me or post here if you want to chat!


                  Regards,
                  Zennan.
                  Yes a difficult roast by all reports but I agree an interesting one to try and thanks for highlighting a style I haven't heard of. That's what I love about CS, more lets try then no i cant.

                  Cheers Yabba

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Hi men
                    Im the Editor of BritishCoffeeScene and also the writer and maker of the beans you saw in the article.
                    If there is anything I can help with or suggest utilising this method of bean roasting, just ask. Im not an expert in torrefacto making, I just adapted everything I know about the process into this form of hot air roasting and it works for me. It took me a long time to work out all the ratio's for the small scale roast, and if the directions are followed precisely, it will work for you.

                    regards
                    Gary

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      my parents were trying to tell me that a dash of cognac at the end of my roast would improve the taste of the beans.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Welcome Garyw!

                        I never thought the writer of the article under discussion might drop in, that's awesome! I hope you're ok with the link being used, mate... thanks for the great article, too! There must have been a lot of cleaning before you sorted the ratios, I guess. Hopefully now I will be able to find someone in Aus who can sort out a batch for me... unless, Garyw, how would you feel about being an internationally recognized coffee roaster (by posting a batch to South Australia)? I'd be happy to spring for postage if you are in Philippines or USA... UK or Spain might be a bit costly, though.

                        Yes, I really am that curious! Doing it this way will still cost me less than setting up my own roaster and going through all the learning needed just to roast well... then I'd have to re learn with the sugar added... DOH! Brain hurting just thinking about it!

                        Regards,
                        Zennan.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Hi Zennan
                          Im currently in the U.K.

                          I think that it would be easier for you to find a local roaster with a breadmaker setup, and get them to do it for you. As long as they follow the directions in the article,
                          300 grams (until you know what you are doing)
                          roast till temp I suggest
                          add 12% of sugar by volume ( I suggest.. for the first roast, add 10% so add 30gm sugar)
                          Roast until just into 2nd crack.
                          dump....

                          either add another straight batch in the breadmaker and roast...or just scrape what is left on the pan sides and clean. There will NOT be much sugar at these ratio's in the pan.

                          Now.. I would suggest you roast some robusta. Why? simply because you can add it to anything at between 10% to 35% ratio, and have a really balanced espresso or latte with the berry of your choice. You can try several different single origins this way.

                          It is worth doing it yourself simply because the taste is amazing in a milk base, and you will want more.

                          Next time I roast torrefacto I will video it for you.

                          g

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Sounds great, and thanks so much for your time thus far, too. I look forward to learning as soon as I can scrounge the time!

                            Regards,
                            Zennan.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by garyw View Post
                              add 12% of sugar by volume ( I suggest.. for the first roast, add 10% so add 30gm sugar)
                              You say do it by volume but then you give directions to do it by mass. So should it be done by volume or by mass???


                              Java " " phile
                              Toys! I must have new toys!!!

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