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  • Corretto advice

    Hello,

    I recently bought a Tefal Breadmaker (OW3001). The baking pan has a tefal coating. Would it be safe to roast my beans in it? If not, could I lay aluminium foil in it? Also, would I need a temperature data logger to get good consistent roasts?

    Cheers,
    Brad

  • #2
    Hi Brad,

    You will find the bread maker fine to roast with. I have used mine for and many others without a problem. The only issue i has was sometimes smaller beans would get caught under the paddle while adgitating causing the beans to wear away the coating. As for a data logger i with many others here would highly recommend it if you intend on properly logging roasts. Andy's one from Beanbay is the best bet.

    Kind regards,

    Chris

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    • #3
      Hi Chris,

      Thanks for your advice. Are you certain that Tefal/Teflon coatings are safe with heat guns? I'll have a look at getting a data logger soon.

      Thanks again,
      Brad

      Comment


      • #4
        Hi Brad
        The coatings should be OK - when roasting you only head towards 230° max in the pan (despite the gun power specs) which I imagine any coating would be rated for when used for baking bread. But eventually the coating does wear away from all the abrasion of the beans (which it does with bread dough too for that matter!), but at least in coffee I imagine and particles would stay in the used puck anyway than in your loaf!
        I wouldn't lose any sleep - just get corretto'ing!

        And the Data-logger is pretty essential IMHO - esp if you want consistent results once you've figured it all out ;-)

        Matt

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        • #5
          Hi Matt,

          Thanks for your re-assurance. Do you know if all the new bread makers have a temperature sensor and if they'd need to be removed?

          Thanks!
          Brad

          Comment


          • #6
            Hi Brad
            Many of them do. From memory, mine was just some white cloth wrapped wires that came and screwed to the main metal casing. I just undid the sensor bit from the metal casing, electrical taped it all just to be sure and tucked it all back into the main plastic casing, then insulated the pan with fire blanket which keeps the temp down too outside the pan.

            I ended up going the full rewire route too - so certainly no problem now!

            But actually, if you insulate and lid the pan, you also tend to need less heat input as well which can help…
            I'd just have a try on your dough setting and see what happens.

            Just be really careful - all 240v in there!
            Matt

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            • #7
              Hi Matt,

              I'll be sure to buy a fire blanket and tape up the temp sensor. I'm not sure about the lid yet, I don't have the tools to fabricate a steel lid so I might cut a hole in the middle and fit the heat gun into it.

              Thanks

              Comment


              • #8
                Hey Brad,

                Enjoy your coretto journey.

                Insulate the pan with two wraps of the fire blanket and secure with wire.

                When you're starting out on the coretto, I would recommend you remove the lid just so you can see and smell the roasting process.

                After a number of succesfull roasts and your confidence grows, you may knock out the glass of the lid to accommodate the heat gun and install it back onto the breadmaker. Just make sure there is a vent for chaff and smoke to escape.

                I,ve had success using tiles, playdough moulded, fired and set in the oven, and my current set up which is fibro-board which easily obtainable at hardware stores. Wine cork screwed into the middle of the board as a handle, holesawed two holes. One for the heat gun, the other for venting.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Second what Gary has said - all sorts of options!
                  Even alfoil can work well as a temporary lid. Mine is made from an old cake tin base with a few layers of fibro on top. Fibro is great - don't even need any power tools - you can score and snap your basic shapes with the edge of a flat screwdriver, and cut holes or curves with a small flat screwdriver & hammer - just nip away at it ;-)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Just echoing or reinforcing previous comments.

                    I used a pizza tray for ages as a partial cover, poor insulation properties.
                    A few months ago I found a decent tile, glazed one side, i guess its about 7mm thick and its big enough to cover the entire opening but leaving enough room for the heat gun nozzle to point down into one corner = the corner where the bean mass will be turning / taking the heat away underneath the covered part and then ends up exhausting opposite the HG nozzle. Advantage of a tile like this, if you need to let a bit of heat out at any stage its really easy just to pull back the tile slightly, i am talking one centimetre increments to make minor adjustments to temp rise. If you find the roast is about to stall and you want to keep more heat in briefly, you can angle the tile so it covers almost all of pan except for HG nozzle.

                    The majority of my chaff ends up inside the bread maker chamber, in-between the pan and rest of machine and is easy to suck out with vacuum.

                    I have only just insulated with the fire blanket after about a year without. 3 roasts in and I am loving it, so much more stable and easier to manage. Less heat needed at the crucial latter parts of the roast and its HEAPS quiter. I Will be tasting the results in a few more days, but going by the smell of the beans....i can tell already its going to be an improvement.

                    If you can grab the data logger from beanbay, download the CS software and hook it up to a computer,it makes getting great repeatable results a lot easier.
                    I went for around a year just roasting by sight and sound, the ability to monitor the temps so closely is priceless and has big impacts on the end results in the cup and you can really experiment and fine tune your roasts to your brewing equipment giving you what you desire in the cup.

                    Enjoy the journey into making your own roaster, its very very addictive and with so many great beans to try in beanbay you will never be short of something new to subject your taste buds to.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thanks everyone for your excellent advice. My beans arrived this morning so I'll grab a fire blanket after work. I still have to find something cheap with a base so I can mount the heat gun to it. I had a look around bunnings the other day and found nothing. I might have to use a pedestal fan for now.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Also, what's the minimum amount of beans I'll need to have in the BM to get a good roast? I'd like to keep it as low as possible as I don't like to drink stale coffee.

                        Cheers

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Hi Brad
                          That's exciting! It'll be great to get going.
                          I've found that 350g of greens is an good size - when roasted you can just squeeze them into a 250g coffee pouch, and that does us a week. Too much less, it gets unpredictable to log or control.
                          Are you using an adjustable gun or fixed temp? If it is adjustable, just make up some sort of cradle/support out of coathangers. If it is fixed, you might need to use something adjustable - like a camera tripod/worklight stand etc

                          Happy roasting!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by BradG View Post
                            Also, what's the minimum amount of beans I'll need to have in the BM to get a good roast? I'd like to keep it as low as possible as I don't like to drink stale coffee.
                            Cheers
                            I usually roast 300g batches of green for ~250g of browns, stored in ziplock one-way valved bags (available from beanbay) they're considered by many (most?) here to be the best way to store coffee.

                            As for the heatgun, I have mine mounted on a cheap and (very) nasty chinese camera tripod ($20 shipped from evilBay).

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Hi Matt,

                              I'm using a $35 Ozito heat gun from bunnings. I'll see if I can mount the heat gun with a few coat hangers. I think I might try 300g of green beans and see if that'll do the trick. How high would the tip of the heat gun need to be from the bottom of the tray for 300 grams of green beans? Should I leave the gun at 30 degrees for the whole roast or adjust it before and after first crack?

                              Cheers

                              Comment

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