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  • Low and slow

    Just been reading about the wood fired coffee roasters and I'm thinking that it's mostly the gimmick factor (which I LOVE by the way... what a great differentiation!! I'm thinking temp control would be a nightmare though...) but I'm wondering if anyone has tried roasting that slowing on a commercial roaster? (if it's possible...) From the looks of things the wood fired roast can take up to an hour...

    2 Questions:
    1) If you have variable gas control / dual burners on a commercial 10-15kg roaster, can you extend the roast out this far?
    2) Can anyone attest to the touted "slow roasting process results in coffee that is lower in acidity and higher in body" from a more gradual increase in the bean's internal temp??

  • #2
    Originally posted by andrewT View Post
    Just been reading about the wood fired coffee roasters and I'm thinking that it's mostly the gimmick factor (which I LOVE by the way... what a great differentiation!! I'm thinking temp control would be a nightmare though...) but I'm wondering if anyone has tried roasting that slowing on a commercial roaster? (if it's possible...) From the looks of things the wood fired roast can take up to an hour...

    2 Questions:
    1) If you have variable gas control / dual burners on a commercial 10-15kg roaster, can you extend the roast out this far?
    2) Can anyone attest to the touted "slow roasting process results in coffee that is lower in acidity and higher in body" from a more gradual increase in the bean's internal temp??
    I don't think anyone would disagree with the assertion that a long slow roast would yield coffee with lower acidity and more body. However, this would also result in coffee lacking sweetness, structure (a touch of acidity is good at keeping things balanced), any hint of terroir and overall character. It would most likely be a very dry, woody and bland cuppa.
    Last edited by Vinitasse; 17 July 2013, 06:01 PM.

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    • #3
      Yeah, that's what I was wondering... if it would really dry the beans out (and if that matters). I will have to try it on my little home roaster and do a side by side.

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      • #4
        I ran a few 150 gram roasts out to 30 minutes 2nd crack and have to grind them incredibly fine to get a 30 second shot and then it is undrinkable. Some commercially roasted beans I picked up with the same roast date as my home roast were ground much coarser and tasted great. The long roasted beans presented the same as stale beans to me.

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