Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Storing full 70 kg bags

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Storing full 70 kg bags

    Hi there,

    For those of you who buy by the 60 or 70 kg bag, I was wondering what sort of container you store beans in?

    Thanks,
    Terence

  • #2
    Most of the time when you buy full sacks of coffee they are sold in grain pro bags which is a thick plastic bag inside the hessian sack. The usual process is to open it up when required and close it up with a cable tie to ensure no air gets into the bag. This is the simplest way for commercial roasters to store their beans.

    The next thing they need to worry about is where they place the sacks, you would obviously want to keep them out of direct sunlight and in a cooler room but sometimes you will be limited with your premises on where they can be stored.

    Some of the larger scaled roasters have temperature controlled rooms for the storage of their higher quality beans.

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks for the response

      Comment


      • #4
        Most commercial roasters just use a standard warehouse where bags are stacked on pallets and put up in the racking. Temp controlled rooms would be a dream...

        70kg bags generally only come from Colombia. Every other country is 60kgs unless you get the 30kg bags from brazil... 16 bags to a pallet - standard weight is 1000kgs per pallet of coffee. There are some exceptions though...

        Comment


        • #5
          I was referring to temperature controlled rooms for some of the roasters that bring in super high quality CoE batches. I've seen a few images of Australian roasters with these temp controlled rooms recently, I can't recall who but remember them coming through my Instagram feed.

          You can't help but think that the beans that make it to the top of the pallet racking are going to end up with some sort of a negative effect being either too close to the tin roof and factory laser lighting sheets, or from being high and the obvious rising heat in the building. Even a mixture of the two.

          Coffee... The never ending mysterious journey

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by brendogs View Post
            I was referring to temperature controlled rooms for some of the roasters that bring in super high quality CoE batches. I've seen a few images of Australian roasters with these temp controlled rooms recently, I can't recall who but remember them coming through my Instagram feed.

            You can't help but think that the beans that make it to the top of the pallet racking are going to end up with some sort of a negative effect being either too close to the tin roof and factory laser lighting sheets, or from being high and the obvious rising heat in the building. Even a mixture of the two.

            Coffee... The never ending mysterious journey
            There aren't too many CoE coffees in 70kg bags

            Comment


            • #7
              Not sure what the motivation is for the "roasters" who apparently keep certain coffees in temperature controlled rooms, when from the time the coffee leaves the grower, to the time it arrives at the roasters door, it has been in widely fluctuating atmospheric conditions anywhere from high humidity high temperature to low humidity low temperature, inside trucks, ocean going containers and non temperature controlled warehouses. Seems a bit precious...but then we have heard enough about the existence of people that want to show they "care about the beans"....

              Comment


              • #8
                I need to find these photos!

                It was late last year I saw it, they had a picture of them making the room out of those insulated EPS panels, then the climate control unit and a couple weeks later the room was full of sacks. It was quite interesting.

                I guess if you have the space, the time and the money and you wanted to minimize the chances of tainting your stock then there's no harm in this approach.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Pretty sure that Rao talks about temperature controlled bean storage.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Not sure if it impacts on the actual flavours or longevity of the green beans, though it may, but with my own little system I've found that storing greens in an more temperature consistent location, as opposed to swinging wildly from 10° to 35° in the shed cupboard has improved the consistency of my own roasting.
                    I believe that Andy's roastery is A/C'd for similar reasons - is that his bean storage too? Would make it much easier to achieve a consistent, repeatable profile when the ambient / green bean temps remain consistent

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Pallets of bagged coffee form quite a large mass. They don't respond that much, or quickly, to diurnal or weekly temperature fluctuations.

                      There is a lazy 's' curve of ambient bean temp over the year. My roastery happens to be a/c but was by accident rather than design.

                      The a/c is only on for roast days to provide a stable temp for consistent roasting. The beans are subject to atmospheric temps

                      at all other times but don't vary much in temperature, long term, and not at all in the short term.

                      Some roasters rarely have the same beans in storage for a year, <<>> 6 months is more common, further reducing the effects

                      of variations.

                      North America, parts of Europe and other Northern climes have long periods of very low temps and but here we are

                      fortunate to have relatively mild seasons, so a comparison isn't valid.

                      Unless you live in Millthorpe!! ;-) :-D
                      Last edited by chokkidog; 21 April 2015, 05:47 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Too true - jolly cold today! Currently 8° - and with windchill taking it down to 3°

                        I'm sure the big bags on palettes are much more temp stable than our tiddler 2.5kg bags - but do you notice any differences that requires slight profile adjustment summer to winter caused by that 'lazy s-curve'?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          No Matt, only the drop temp, which changes gradually over a 20°C (approx) range annually.

                          Once they hit the 60°C turn the profiles are identical. The a/c would play a part here in moderating the air inflows.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            There is a lazy 's' curve of ambient bean temp over the year.


                            Re - 'The Curve ' in temp of green beans in storage.


                            Could this indeed be the significant but mythical - ' Laffer Curve ' ?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Rao who?

                              Thanks for the common sense / real life explanations chokkidog. Well said.

                              The thing you must not do when storing is seal the container (whatever it may be) that the greens are being stored in. You let it breathe, or you risk problems.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X