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static electricity in home roasted beans

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  • static electricity in home roasted beans

    Hi,I am a new convert to home roasting, just done roast #7 in my new behmor + and started grinding and drinking the first roasts in the last couple of days, something I've noticed with my roasted beans is that they are spraying out all over the bench top as they are ground and fall into the container, something that didn't happen with commercial roasted beans, I'm using an Marhlkonig Vario grinder, when using the grinders supplied plastic container the grinds cling to the sides and are hard to remove until shorted out on the kitchen tap then fall to the bottom and can be emptied out easily, ok I believe a clear case that the grinds are statically charged, this never happened with commercially roasted beans,
    so has anyone else noticed this situation in their home roasted grinds? should you, can you, discharge your freshly roasted beans before storing?
    John.

  • #2
    I theory on this as I also noticed more static with fresh roasts is I believe the fresher roasts have more oil in them and that contributed to the static.
    I don't think handling them any different before grinding would change the scenario. I have been considering the idea of using paper tubes whilst filling the portafilter like I have seen elsewhere but are yet to implement this yet.

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    • #3
      I've often used 1 or 2 day old commercial beans without any signs of this much static from this same grinder so I'm wondering if commercial roasters have some form of earthing to discharge the beans while roasting, I'll experiment with some form of earth on the roasting drum after removing it from the roaster and rolling the beans around in it for a bit to see if it has any effect,
      John.

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      • #4
        Most likely the difference is in how long the beans sit out post roasting before being bagged. Most commercial roasters beans spend a lot more time sitting around post roasting soaking up the environment's humidity than a home roaster where the beans tend to be sealed away with-in minutes of coming out of the roaster.


        Java "Can you say hydrophilic?" phile
        Toys! I must have new toys!!!

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        • #5
          I'd say Javaphile is on the money; moisture content is the key.

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          • #6
            Ok that seems to make sense, are there any other benefits or not to more or less moisture in the bean post roast other than static ?
            John.

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            • #7
              More moisture means that the beans will stale faster and will need to be consumed more quickly. This is a bit like "How long is a piece of string?" sort of scenario though as there is so much variability in everyone's circumstances that there is no way to predict exactly how this will affect a particular individual.

              Another thing to be aware of, more lightly roasted beans seem to be more susceptible to influences by static. Maybe because less of the beans' natural oils are brought towards the surface of the bean, don't know really. Something that might help where plastic containers are concerned though, is if you wipe the surface of the plastic down with a very fine layer of powdered graphite, not enough so that it is visible though. This should allow any static charge to dissipate along the carbon film through to the grinder's metal framework - Sounds good in theory anyway....

              Mal.

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              • #8
                You should see what your weight loss is from roasting.

                Weigh your charge of green beans accurate to 1g, weigh again as soon as they are cool.

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                • #9
                  Sounds like a good reason to bling your grinder with carbon fibre (then add some neons)...

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