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New roaster in struggle town - can't get a decent pour!

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  • New roaster in struggle town - can't get a decent pour!

    Hi all,

    Pretty new to roasting, but have had my machine (Rancillio sylvia + rocky doserless grinder) for many years.

    My problem is this: I roasted a batch of Ethiopian Sidamo last week, and since starting to use it (5 days after roasting) it has become progressively slower to pour, almost to the point that it's not pouring at all! I am now grinding on pretty much the coarsest setting I can, am slightly underfilling the basket and taking care not to tamp too heavily… I feel like I'm missing something pretty obvious, but have no idea what it is!

    In terms of roast details: using a behmor 1600, brand new. Roasted 400g beans w a 1.45 pre-roast then a P2 setting. 1C at 6.15 then 2C at 3.45.

    Have never had any issues like this before using commercially roasted beans.

    Any help would be very much appreciated!

    Cheers,

  • #2
    2C at 3:45? Do you mean 2C was 3min45sec after 1C? That's quite a big gap. Is it a very dark roast? Some photos of the roasted beans themselves might help.

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    • #3
      Possibly referring to "Time to Go" on the Timer maybe...

      Mal.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Dimal View Post
        Possibly referring to "Time to Go" on the Timer maybe...

        Mal.
        Ah yes, that would make more sense. Duh. So the next question is - how far into 2C was the roast stopped? Hopefully not 3min45sec!!!

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        • #5
          Originally posted by LeroyC View Post
          Ah yes, that would make more sense. Duh. So the next question is - how far into 2C was the roast stopped? Hopefully not 3min45sec!!!
          I hope not and also hope a fire extinguisher was handy...

          Mal.

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          • #6
            Haha, thanks guys. So 1C started at 6.15 and i thought stopped at 5.07 (that is, on the 'time to go' timer). Then 2C went at 3.45, and I would have stopped it as soon as I was confident that is what i was hearing.. So I guess time lapse betw start of 1C and start of 2C was 2mins 30secs, and time lapse betw end of 1C and start of 2C was 1min 22 secs.

            I can't figure out how to upload a photo of the beans but the only thing i was thinking is that the chaf (? right term) seems to be quite prominent on my beans compared w beans I buy - ie, not adequately roasted… Otherwise the beans look pretty normal, and certainly don't taste burnt...

            Thanks for your help!

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            • #7
              G'day Shane...

              Sorry about the shaky attempt at roasting humour mate...

              Re: posting photos - I think you have to have a minimum of five posts under your belt before this is enabled.
              Don't worry too much about the amount of chaff being retained by the beans. This varies a lot from one bean variety to another, roast depth and the type of roaster used. Big commercial drum roasters coupled with a strong fan draught tend to dislodge and remove more chaff than gentle roasters like the Behmor.

              The most important criteria, is what the results in the cup are like. In the end, that's all that matters. There's heaps of info to be found in other dedicated threads kicked off by fellow Behmor owners Shane, so would highly recommend doing a search for them and throwing a few questions around.

              Have fun mate...

              Mal.

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              • #8
                Hi Shane
                For what it's worth, some of the Ethiopians (like the Sidamo and the Harrar in my experience) like a faster roast than many other beans. When these beans are baked (ie roasted too slowly) they turn quite powdery which will choke a machine in a big way unless you change grinder setting dramatically.
                Point in case - I found that with Harrar Longberry I had to roast these 2-3 minutes faster than a normal Ethiopian to get a reasonable grind - if I roasted like I would for a Yirgacheffe say, I had to adjust my grinder by 1-1.5 steps - when the most I usually adjusted that grinder was 0.25 steps!
                So - if they don't taste burnt, they may well have been roasted too long overall, especially in the 1c-2c zone.
                I don't know the Behmor well - and as Mal said there is lots of info here on Behmor technique - but I'd guess try a different setting to roast 'em faster

                Cheers Matt

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                • #9
                  Thanks Mal. Appreciate the support, and the humor

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                  • #10
                    Thanks Matt!

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