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Help on flavouring notes and Roast level

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  • Help on flavouring notes and Roast level

    hello
    im v.new to coffee roasting world and i havnt tried to roast even once.. i got a guy from whom ill get 5x 1 pound bags of diff origin beans.. i have decided to go with these after few days of research.. kindly tell me if my 5 choices are good and is there any origin i just get replacing the one im getting.. also for each origin please tell me briefly about flavour notes and what level to roast it to. also if anyone can what blends can i make with these my choices are :=>

    -Colombian Supremo
    -Ethipia Sidamo
    -Guatemala SHB EP
    -Sumatra Mandheling
    -Nicaragua SHG EP Jinotega organic


    ill use stovetop method.. no special equipment.. either skillet with whisk or wok with whisk
    thanks!

  • #2
    Bump! .

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    • #3
      Originally posted by texh View Post
      Bump! .
      Not asking much are you?

      Rather than have us spoon feed you our own knowledge and experiences it would be far better if you started teaching yourself and training your own palate. Why not roast up a small batch of each to the same roast degree (not too light, not too dark) and then cup them (a google search will point you in the right direction vis-a-vis "Cupping") and then you will discover what each bean has to offer. Then, with that knowledge in hand you'll have a clue about which beans might work together in a blend... according to your own preferences and palate. Don't be shy grasshopper... go and play and have fun learning

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      • #4
        Agree about cupping. Definitely best way to get more "intimate knowledge" about your beans, much more insight than any tasting notes anyone could give you.

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        • #5
          Welcome texh

          You were probably aiming a little broadly in your questions which is why you didn't get a lot of response (covering roasting technique, cupping and blending in a first time roaster post!) - which is kinda like asking 'how do I drive and which car should I buy?!'

          But Vinitasse is right - looks like ou have a great range of beans there - so give them a go and see what you think!

          FWIW I'm not sure how many people use the ole frypan long term, but worth a go. If you want to experiment with roasting, you'd be much better off picking up a popcorn popper (new from approx $20 depending on the specials or like me $2 from the tip shop!) and you'll find endless pages on this site about popper technique and process. Will most likely give a better result too…

          Happy roasting!
          Matt

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          • #6
            Try google and self educate. The 'origins' you have listed are not 'origins' as in "Single Origin" used in the roasting industry and are far too broad to describe with any meaning. What you have listed are either categories or growing regions. i.e. Colombia Supremo is a grade or classification and does not denote the region or farm.

            The Sidamo on the other hand, denotes a region of Ethiopia where a lot of coffee is grown;
            it's a huge area of diverse coffee and coffee processing and can't be given a meaningful taste profile that would describe them all, however, if you were to Google each of your bean names you will start to build a picture of what makes each of them unique.

            If you google 'making a coffee blend' you will find some good pointers to get you started.
            Last edited by chokkidog; 22 August 2016, 10:00 PM. Reason: Typo

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            • #7
              thanks guys..
              sorry i started off my posts very strong.. but thats just because im too excited about it and at the same time v.noob..
              ill follow all the advices you guys posted and will see ..

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