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Greetings from Texas! Thanks for the intro to Corretto!

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  • Greetings from Texas! Thanks for the intro to Corretto!

    I started roasting last fall with a Whirley Pop stove top popcorn maker over the side burner of my gas grill. It was a good, simple way to start and a definite move up from buying pre-roasted beans.

    Thinking about maybe getting a Fresh Roast SR540, I somehow stumbled across discussions here about the great results using home built Corretto roasters. Being one who loves to tinker and re-purpose stuff and looking at it more closely, I was hooked.

    A quick trip to the Goodwill thrift shop the next week yielded the one bread maker they had, a $5.99 (USD) Panasonic. I knew that the dough cycle on those units is a no-go, so I gutted it and re-wired directly through some wires I soldered to the startup capacitor then installed an on/off switch on the cord. First test run of the Panasonic revealed that the paddle came close enough to the sides to pinch a bean in there and stop the motor, so I had to shorten it about 6mm. I got the idea from Belinda's postings in 2006 to mount the heat gun (a 2 speed variable from Amazon) with cable ties onto the handle of the old bottle capper from my home brewing days. Finally, drilled a couple of small holes for the thermocouple sensor. Ready to give it a go!

    I've done a couple of batches of around 225g in it so far and still sort of getting the hang of it, but I must say that both lots (a Colombian Supremo and a Mexican Nayarita) have been an improvement (more consistent and even with better flavor profiles) vs what I was getting out of the Whirley Pop. I place a box fan behind the heat gun and run it on low to direct the chaff away and found that to work quite nicely since its the same fan I use to quickly cool afterwards. The additional advantages I'm seeing are that I no longer smell of smoke like I previously did after a batch and I don't have chaff blowing up all over me when cooling the beans over the fan. Nice.

    To all of you who took the time to share your experiences and experimentation with all of this, please accept my thanks. I've already got a few folks around here interested in doing this, so it continues to spread.

    https://photos.app.goo.gl/hKvWjXb56xXZ2FEm6

  • #2
    Morning PinkFloyd, welcome to Coffee Snobs.

    Coretto roasting is good value, produces excellent results for very little outlay and of course is not expensive to set up.

    I have a single loaf setup similar to what you are using and roast batches of 750 grams without any problem, good luck with your endeavors.

    As a matter of interest what part of Texas do you hail from? I have a good friend in Blanco, have visited him a number of times over the years.

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    • #3
      Welcome PinkFloyd...

      You're definitely well on your way now mate.
      Be sure to let us know how you progress along this very interesting, enjoyable and tasty hobby...

      Mal.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Yelta View Post
        Morning PinkFloyd, welcome to Coffee Snobs.

        Coretto roasting is good value, produces excellent results for very little outlay and of course is not expensive to set up.

        I have a single loaf setup similar to what you are using and roast batches of 750 grams without any problem, good luck with your endeavors.

        As a matter of interest what part of Texas do you hail from? I have a good friend in Blanco, have visited him a number of times over the years.
        I've been thinking that I ought to increase the amount of each roast. I had several beans sneak out yesterday. It's helpful to know that you've had good runs with 750g. A full pound (454g) will go into mine next time.

        I'm in Tyler which is a city of about 100,000 folk around 160km est of Dallas. I've managed to go through Blanco a few times on motorcycle trips to that part of the state.

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        • #5
          Welcome to CS and welcome to the Corretto journey. I am new to it myself and loving every step

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          • #6
            Originally posted by barlo View Post
            Welcome to CS and welcome to the Corretto journey. I am new to it myself and loving every step
            Thanks barlo!

            I'm looking forward to the rain stopping here tomorrow so that I can finally head out to my usual spot on the back deck to roast what remains of my Mexican Nayarita beans. The first batch of them was so good, but it's almost gone.

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