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1st & 2nd Roasts - Feat. Corretto Roaster

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  • 1st & 2nd Roasts - Feat. Corretto Roaster

    Not that long ago, I joined this forum just to learn a little more about coffee and get unbiased info on coffee gear.

    It was also not that long ago that I learned that people were roasting their own coffee at home with the patented (?) Corretto method. I thought to myself, I don't want to go that far, roasting my own coffee - it looks like a lot of effort.

    So here I am, with not too much time passed since then and I'm posting my first roasts with a home made Corretto ?
    The rabbit hole has gotten deep very quickly....

    Results: https://photos.app.goo.gl/9dEpKVkTdMLe1LyZ9
    Note the colour in the photos is a little lighter than what they actually are.

    1st Roast - Colombian Volcan Galeras Supremo
    Total Time - 19mins
    1st Crack - 17mins
    2nd Crack - Didn't get there ?
    350g in - 296g out (15% loss)

    The breadmaker decided to shut down due to over-heating at the 19min mark - which left me flurrying to try get the beans out of the Corretto and into the exhaust fan bucket with sieve. This also left the beans with a much lighter roast than I was aiming for.

    My takeouts were that I took too long to get up to temperature (way too long for 1st crack?). So I tried to rectify this with the 2nd roast.

    2nd Roast - Ethiopia Shakisso Estate
    Total Time - 20mins
    1st Crack - 12mins
    2nd Crack - 19 mins (I think)
    350g in - 295g out (15% loss)

    Much better roast, got up to temp quicker and held it (Without the Corretto over-heating), much better colour and fragrance from the fresh roasted beans. Probably need to get up to temp even quicker still?

    A few questions:
    - I think my probe may be a little high and in the direct path of the heat gun - so showing a mix of somewhere between bean temp and heat gun temp. As I'm assuming a bean temp of 250c at first crack would be way too high?
    - Do the roasts look too uneven? My breadmaker is rectangular, so there may be a little less movement in the beans than there should be.
    - Is the 2nd crack generally significantly fainter than the 1st crack?

    Now I just have to hold out to start tasting them!!! ?

    Anyway, thanks for taking the time to read - constructive feedback is most welcome!

  • #2
    250C first crack sounds off. Without seeing where the probe is I would still guess it is not located within the bean mass.

    Photos are hard for others to judge actual colour/shade etc but those pics show some unevenness in the roast. Mind you, I have roasted many batches that look just like that and tasted damn delicious in the cup which is what is most important!

    Comment


    • #3
      Maybe you could post up some photos of the whole setup to give us an idea of what you're working with.
      If you know of any licensed sparkies nearby who love fresh coffee, you might be able to convince someone to modify the wiring in your b-maker so that it doesn't cause over-temperature trips. Usually easy to do...

      The second roast does look better in development than the first batch but the only true test is to try them in the cup.
      Generally, try to aim for a post 1st-Crack time of 5 minutes or less to avoid the possibility of "baking" the batch.
      The closer to 2nd-Crack you get, the more body will be realised in the cup, less of the bean intrinsic flavours and more of the roast flavours. All good of course and will depend on you and what you prefer in the cup at the end of the day...

      Mal.

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks for the feedback fellas!

        I've added some photos of the setup and probe position in the same link:
        https://photos.app.goo.gl/9dEpKVkTdMLe1LyZ9

        I will definitely move the position of the probe down. In the photos - that's with 350g of beans.
        Do you think moving it down another 10mm would do? Or does it need to be right near the bottom of the bean mass?

        I'm going to get the HeatSnob and run a couple of probes eventually - but will stick with the one in the short term.

        Had my first taste of the Colombian beans today and they were nice and smooth. Definitely would've liked them a bit darker for some stronger flavour (as I drink mainly milk based coffees), but that's what the next roast is for! ?




        Comment


        • #5
          Hello again...

          Have found that running the probe about 25mm below the surface of the green bean load produces reliable and consistent output.
          What you could do though, is run a vertical line of holes about 12mm apart to facilitate running with a number of different batch sizes. A lot of us do that...

          Just for your info too, 2nd-Crack is softer than 1st-Crack overall but sounds completely different in that it is more like the sound you get when you crinkle a piece of cellophane in your hand; kind of a scrunching sound as opposed to the popcorn popping sound of 1st-Crack.

          Mal.

          Comment


          • #6
            I have the exact same bread maker/heat gun setup and I’m also running a heat snob. I found it took a few holes to get the positioning right. I got the 100mm probe and put a couple of wood blocks on the probe to reduce the length it goes into the bread maker. If it goes into far it restricts bean movement. I also took the opportunity to glue in a couple of magnets to the wood blacks to hold the probe in place. I was quite proud of my hack job. I find the paddle does a good job of moving the beans evenly so long as you have at least 300ish grams of beans in. Anything less and the paddle doesn’t rotate them enough. I also get variations in beans in each roast. I pre blend and often have to discard a few beans that weren’t quite roasted enough. I figure variation is part of the process and what makes each batch a little different.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Dimal View Post
              Hello again...

              Have found that running the probe about 25mm below the surface of the green bean load produces reliable and consistent output.
              What you could do though, is run a vertical line of holes about 12mm apart to facilitate running with a number of different batch sizes. A lot of us do that...

              Just for your info too, 2nd-Crack is softer than 1st-Crack overall but sounds completely different in that it is more like the sound you get when you crinkle a piece of cellophane in your hand; kind of a scrunching sound as opposed to the popcorn popping sound of 1st-Crack.

              Mal.
              Great idea to drill a few holes a different depths that I can use depending on how much I'm roasting.
              Will have to keep a very watchful ear to try and catch those 2nd cracks whilst I'm getting the hang of it!

              Originally posted by crazyhakins
              I have the exact same bread maker/heat gun setup and I’m also running a heat snob. I found it took a few holes to get the positioning right. I got the 100mm probe and put a couple of wood blocks on the probe to reduce the length it goes into the bread maker. If it goes into far it restricts bean movement. I also took the opportunity to glue in a couple of magnets to the wood blacks to hold the probe in place. I was quite proud of my hack job. I find the paddle does a good job of moving the beans evenly so long as you have at least 300ish grams of beans in. Anything less and the paddle doesn’t rotate them enough. I also get variations in beans in each roast. I pre blend and often have to discard a few beans that weren’t quite roasted enough. I figure variation is part of the process and what makes each batch a little different.
              I did notice yesterday just playing around with the probe depth that it did interfere a little with the beans when I spun the paddle. Might play around with the depth as well.

              What do you feel are the advantages to pre-blending? Is it predominantly a time saver thing so that you don't have to do a couple of roasts?

              Comment


              • #8
                It’s mostly about quantities. If I were to post blend, I’d end up with a batch too big to get through. It’s also convenience.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Machvayne View Post
                  I've added some photos of the setup and probe position in the same link:
                  https://photos.app.goo.gl/9dEpKVkTdMLe1LyZ9
                  That's a tidy looking setup! Second pic of the roasted beans looks nice. Enjoy the fresh roast!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Machvayne View Post
                    Great idea to drill a few holes a different depths that I can use depending on how much I'm roasting. Will have to keep a very watchful ear to try and catch those 2nd cracks whilst I'm getting the hang of it! I did notice yesterday just playing around with the probe depth that it did interfere a little with the beans when I spun the paddle. Might play around with the depth as well. What do you feel are the advantages to pre-blending? Is it predominantly a time saver thing so that you don't have to do a couple of roasts?
                    A question about your setup, have you removed the glass viewing window from the lid? The hole for the heat gun to go in is very snug, just checking there’s a way for the hot air to exhaust.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by barlo View Post
                      That's a tidy looking setup! Second pic of the roasted beans looks nice. Enjoy the fresh roast!
                      Cheers! Took some reading to pull all the different elements together, but there's so much good info on this forum from everyone who's done it before that it was pretty easy!

                      Originally posted by crazyhakins
                      A question about your setup, have you removed the glass viewing window from the lid? The hole for the heat gun to go in is very snug, just checking there’s a way for the hot air to exhaust.
                      Yep, removed the glass window to use that hole for the exhaust. Wasn't sure if it would be large enough or in the right position, but it seemed to do alright as there was plenty of chaff flying out.

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