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How long do you rest the beans after roasting?

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  • How long do you rest the beans after roasting?

    Hi all.

    Got my Kaffelogic Nano 7 the other day and I've run about 8-9 batches with the Colombian and Peru AAA from Bean Bay.

    I've always heard that you had to 'de-gas' or rest the beans for about 5 days after roasting, as pulling an espresso before that could result in too much CO2 which means too much crema in the cup.

    I'm currently drinking the oldest beans I have, which are 3 days post roasting, and too much crema is what I'm getting.

    The photos below are when I pulled a shot from 1 day old beans. 3 days old now they aren't as bad but still too much crema.

    I'll see what they're like 5-7 days in.

    Would appreciate any help.




  • #2
    I don't think you can definitively attach the same rest time to all beans. Most people will say that the roast profile and beans determines the rest time. They may be right. The earliest I taste my own roast is 5 days but I, generally, rest them for 7 days or more.

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    • #3
      Only way to tell, is to try the beans every day taking note of how it tastes (to you) and then use this as a guide for future roast batches.

      Mal.

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      • #4
        Yes every situation is different as it’s affected by the type of coffee used, the roaster, the roast depth, storage, the brew method etc. The one constant I’ve found is that pretty much everything needs at least 48hrs. After that it really depends on all those variables. I’ve had coffee roasted for espresso brewing quite well at day 3, but other coffee no good for at least a couple of weeks. Most of the decaf I’ve roasted as well as the Monsoon Malabar has needed 12-15 days rest before it’s any good then only lasts 4-5 days before it goes stale. In general I leave most of my coffees, whether I’ve bought them or roasted them myself for 5-7 days before I use them if I can.

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        • #5
          I've found that 10 days seems like a good balance across most beans. Some work after a week and some need two weeks so I've sort of settled on around 10 days. Also some of the beans I've tried that work best after 2 weeks tend to go off fairly quickly.

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          • #6
            Mine are best 2-10 days after roasting. I place beans in an Airscape container and put into the fridge for this period.
            A decline in taste is obvious to me after that time.

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            • #7
              As an aside - I once roasted a bean and after 5 days was still getting significant crema as shown above. I always weigh my shots so thought I was in the right ball park for grind / dose / tamp, as I was 18g in and 40g out in about 25 secs - my typical ratio. I changed my grind a few steps finer with same dose and strangely I got the same brew ratio but with a much thinner layer of crema, and more importantly it tasted better.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Paolo View Post
                Mine are best 2-10 days after roasting. I place beans in an Airscape container and put into the fridge for this period. A decline in taste is obvious to me after that time.
                Why do you put it in the fridge? Do you live in the tropics? What sort of fridge do you use?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by LeroyC View Post
                  Why do you put it in the fridge? Do you live in the tropics? What sort of fridge do you use?
                  Lots of things last better in the fridge...and it's just a fridge.

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                  • #10
                    As others have said it depends....on a lot of things.

                    Most of the KL profiles going (including my own) are quite hot / fast and most are producing various levels of baking, over developed beefy flavours and under development vegetal / astringency or combinations of all these roast defects.

                    Ones current frame of reference will decide how much of a bother these things are. For example going from stale dark roast supermarket coffee to the stock Classic at 3.3 will likely be mind blowing.

                    Going from a Tim Wendelboe espresso roast to the same Classic profile will taste like charred BBQ steak.

                    The more hot / fast / dark and baked the roast is the quicker you will want to use it up, within 7 days because after this things go downhill pretty quick.

                    Hot / fast light roasts that might be a bit underdone can benefit from vac sealing and resting for at least 2 weeks or more then used up quickly.

                    To borrow a term from Andy, "goldilocks" roasts which are well developed and not baked will benefit from 7 to 14 days rest for espresso use depending on roast profile / colour. At which point if stored correctly should be pretty good for another 7 to 14 days depending on preference.

                    Really well executed light to med - light roasts age well and hold flavour for quite a while. Which is great for espresso because excess Co2 in the shot does not taste great.




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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Paolo View Post
                      Lots of things last better in the fridge....
                      Except coffee. (Unless you live in the tropics or have a dedicated fridge like a bar/wine fridge).

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                      • #12
                        There are KL profiles developed, such as 1200-1500 RTD, (Ready to Drink - altitude related profiles) which could be helpful esp when you have just got your machine or stock is getting low. These are designed to be enjoyed within 2 - 3 days apparently. Haven't tried it myself yet.... For various profiles and bean origins, I'm finding them peaking at circa 8 days. My first very dark roast tasted best from 14 to 20 days approx.
                        On saying that, as Dimal Rx, trying daily and monitoring is the way to go. I keep a spreadsheet with profiles, roast levels, beans, grind settings, recipes and taste. I got a couple of Atmos bean storage containers which have a very efficient vacuum lid. Where I got caught, was applying vacuum immediately. Maybe it was just me, but the vacuum seemed to impede that early aging/resting/degassing phase. I now just rest the lid loosely for the first 12 hours, put the lid on the next 2 - 3 days (one way valve) then apply the vacuum until consumed. One hell of a learning curve.

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                        • #13
                          Thanks all, I will try each day and see where the magic mark is.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Dimal View Post
                            Only way to tell, is to try the beans every day taking note of how it tastes (to you) and then use this as a guide for future roast batches.

                            Mal.
                            I have been doing this ever since I first saw Mal make the recommendation some months a go. It is great advice. It has really helped me learn best rest times for my roasts by using objective data rather than following cookie cutter ‘best after’ numbers. Another bonus is I get to brew as early as 12 hours post roast ‘in the name of science’

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by quester View Post
                              There are KL profiles developed, such as 1200-1500 RTD, (Ready to Drink - altitude related profiles) which could be helpful esp when you have just got your machine or stock is getting low. These are designed to be enjoyed within 2 - 3 days apparently. Haven't tried it myself yet.... For various profiles and bean origins, I'm finding them peaking at circa 8 days. My first very dark roast tasted best from 14 to 20 days approx. On saying that, as Dimal Rx, trying daily and monitoring is the way to go. I keep a spreadsheet with profiles, roast levels, beans, grind settings, recipes and taste. I got a couple of Atmos bean storage containers which have a very efficient vacuum lid. Where I got caught, was applying vacuum immediately. Maybe it was just me, but the vacuum seemed to impede that early aging/resting/degassing phase. I now just rest the lid loosely for the first 12 hours, put the lid on the next 2 - 3 days (one way valve) then apply the vacuum until consumed. One hell of a learning curve.
                              Yeah it’s interesting that vacuum storage is becoming popular again as it was generally considered one of the worst ways to store fresh coffee in recent times.

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