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How long do you rest the beans after roasting?

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  • #16
    I have it on good authority :-) that a home corretto roaster rested their competition roast for 7 weeks for the 2019 Golden Bean competetion. That roaster was awareded 2 podiums in categories and 2nd overall! Rules schmules. Taste is your best guide - ask a coffee judge.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by LeroyC View Post
      Yeah it’s interesting that vacuum storage is becoming popular again as it was generally considered one of the worst ways to store fresh coffee in recent times.
      A recent video evaluating several coffee storage containers by James Hoffmann suggests otherwise. He prefers vacuum storage but not by much.

      https://youtu.be/K0JWuhE8a-w

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      • #18
        Originally posted by lancruiser View Post
        A recent video evaluating several coffee storage containers by James Hoffmann suggests otherwise. He prefers vacuum storage but not by much. https://youtu.be/K0JWuhE8a-w
        Yeah I saw that. He pretty much said he would just stick to the old ziplock bag which is what I’ll be doing as well, especially when they have one way valves so that you can expel as much air/gas as possible. For the most part the containers sounded like a waste of money and it was crazy to see how many clear ones there were when it’s well known that exposure to light degrades coffee almost as much as air.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by LeroyC View Post
          Yeah I saw that. He pretty much said he would just stick to the old ziplock bag which is what I’ll be doing as well, especially when they have one way valves so that you can expel as much air/gas as possible. For the most part the containers sounded like a waste of money and it was crazy to see how many clear ones there were when it’s well known that exposure to light degrades coffee almost as much as air.
          Yes, indeed. However, I don't necessarily see transparent containers as a negative. It makes it possible to check how much coffee you have left without opening the containers. I think air is probably a bigger enemy of coffee. As to keeping them out of light, simply store them somewhere light-proof, e.g. in a cupboard.

          There are cheaper vacuum containers around. Those designed specifically for coffee tend to be expensive. Sunbeam makes some Foodsaver vacuum containers that are cheaper. We use them to stretch the viability of food. I experimented with using them to store coffee and found that they also extend the resting time. In the end, I decided not to use them and compromised on air tight containers, i.e. preserving jars.

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          • #20
            I usually just put them in a jar for 24 hours and then all good

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            • #21
              So many variables in this debate.
              Taste rules above all
              you can do a test espresso a few hrs after roasting if you grind and leave it for a time before pulling the shot.
              Different roasters have a massive impact but also degree of development and roast and bean. A light roast acidic coffee can mellow over time & be truely great at 10 weeks. Or it could be stale .
              Track what you do so once you achieve great coffee it’s repeatable

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              • #22
                A danish coffee roaster roasted his beans in Ikawa roaster on the day of the competition (can't remember think it was world coffee brewer championship), and grinded his beans an hour before brewing and came second overall. Giesha beans I believe, goes to show.

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                • #23
                  so is the general rule is the darker the roast the longer it needs to rest? as there is more CO2 in the beans?

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                  • #24
                    Ah, no.
                    The problem with 'General Rules' is that they don't apply to all things coffee.
                    You have no option really other than to taste test as the rest/development period progresses...

                    Mal.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by MAST88 View Post
                      so is the general rule is the darker the roast the longer it needs to rest? as there is more CO2 in the beans?
                      No. If you want to generalise it’s actually the other way around. This is because the darker roasted coffee has a lower density and the CO2 escapes faster. As Mal said it’s a broad generalisation and doesn’t always apply so just use it as a starting point and taste to test.

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                      • #26
                        I leave at least 3 days. Friend's advice was that to do make a, say 150-200g batch, make a cup from freshly roasted coffee, then wait 2 days and have make a coffee out of the same batch each day and observe the difference.

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