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5 year old greens….ok to roast and drink?

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  • 5 year old greens….ok to roast and drink?

    Hi Brains trust,

    lockdowns upon lockdowns have me tinkering with roasting again….after a long hiatus! (my old coretto is still gathering dust in the shed ?)

    I have found my old stash of green beans and have a new roaster to try out (keep an eye out for a new post with pics and vids soon!) but first I want to ask your opinion if these old greens are ok to roast then drink (I’m ok roasting some to season the roaster then chucking if the consensus is to the negative)….

    They’re 5 years old but look ok to me. Just want to make sure there is no mould, etc….I don’t trust my untrained eyes!

    I’ll post three pics but have more on hand if needed. These were stored in the original coffeesnobs calico bags inside a plastic tub with lid. Not sure this was 100% air tight but was reasonably sealed and stored in a shed, dark, not too warm or cold and minimal moisture. Visually, the beans look ok to me and they smell just as they did when I received them from Andy 5 years ago.

    first pic is the Brazilian pulped natural, the second is Ethiopian Gambella Sundried and the third is Ethiopian Sidamo.

    thanks in advance all, I really appreciate this forum, being able to count on the collective knowledge and the willingness of you all to share it ?

    Cheers,

    WyldGrind Click image for larger version

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  • #2
    Could be OK. One way to find out: roast some up.
    The Ethiopians are possibly OK but from my experience, the less flavoursome Brazilian beans might not have anything left.

    Comment


    • #3
      I've roasted older without any issues. The flavour could be a bit muted though.

      Comment


      • #4
        Yeh, I do it all the time. Agree that you'll get more mileage out of the Ethiopians. Certainly doesn't hurt to try.

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        • #5
          Thanks All, very much appreciated….I’ve got a new roaster so will season it with the Brazilian but then roast up the Ethiopians and Columbians I found….20kgs I completely forgot about…pretty chuffed they’re ok to still use!

          Thanks again ?

          Comment


          • #6
            Be sure to tell us what’s in the roaster section this week with a pic.

            Comment


            • WyldGrind
              WyldGrind commented
              Editing a comment
              Posted there late last night with some pics and a video roasted up the Brazilian, turned out not to be sacrificial!

          • #7
            I wondered the same thing. I have some older beans that I haven't been sure about. Are there any general rules about what beans might last longer than others and when they start to drop off their prime?

            Comment


            • WyldGrind
              WyldGrind commented
              Editing a comment
              Everything I read recently said to consume within a year but I had a vague recollection of being able to store and use them for years. I was lucky I think with my storage: relatively temp stable and low moisture. My main concern was mould and other toxins and having no long-term exposure to roasting or personal/professional experience I thought it best to rely on the collective knowledge of this wonderful forum. Flavour and complexity seem to be the major victims here, but I can live with that given I don’t have to throw out kgs upon kgs of green

          • #8
            Green beans stored in cotton (so they breathe) cool, dark and dry will be usable for a very long time. They'll taste less interesting with age (muted, flat) but won't be horrible.

            The biggest risk to storing them is in the higher humidity climates where they are likely to grow mould and become a new lifeform but you'll smell and see that pretty quick.

            Comment


            • WyldGrind
              WyldGrind commented
              Editing a comment
              Thanks Andy, that’s good to know. Definitely no humidity down here!

            • Ronin
              Ronin commented
              Editing a comment
              Excellent answer Andy. Was about to post similar

          • #9
            If you're up for an experiment, try Christopher Feran's green rehydration protocol. A few people have experienced improved flavour with this technique (myself included, though I only tried it once with a 2018 Colombian), and for green this old, I'd wager it would make quite a bit of difference. Listened to an interview with Rao today who reckons rehydrated green he's tasted did taste better than the non-rehydrated roast.

            Comment


            • WyldGrind
              WyldGrind commented
              Editing a comment
              Thanks Baca, interesting articles and I learnt something new! It is certainly worth trying on the olde greens I have to see if it resurrects some flavour and complexity.

          • #10
            Will be very interested in the result if you can remember to post an update post-roast WyldGrind

            Comment


            • WyldGrind
              WyldGrind commented
              Editing a comment
              Will keep you posted mate. Yet to rehydrate but I have been drinking some of the Ethiopians and a monsoon malabar I’ve roasted 7-10 days ago: as expected, all very flat through my gaggia classic. Drinkable (esp in milk) but 1 dimensional nonetheless. I pulled a double with the monsoon tonight via the cafelat robot and was very pleasantly surprised. Marked jump in sweetness and body! Almost as if the liver brought back some of the qualities lost through age and a pump….

          • #11
            WyldGrind I'm still surprised by the diversity of experiences with espresso.

            For what its worth, I often find my dark roasts taste flat around the 7 - 12 day mark but then develop a really satisfying full flavor and thickness around the 14 -18 day mark. So I'd be interested to know what you think of your Ethiopians and Malabar after another week.

            That said I had one dark roast that was superb at 8 days and that was the same bean, roasted the same way as other batches that didn't hit maxx flavor until 14 days or later. I guess that there are so many tiny little variable with every cup of espresso that gives us that degree of unpredictability.

            (I'm not sure yet about light roasts because I've spent this year really trying to get consistency with dark roasts.)

            Comment


            • #12
              tompoland i agree, I have spent most of my roasting life exploring at or around second crack so firmly in dark roast territory, I think my palette leans towards sweetness, body and cocoa flavours. I have yet to explore lighter roasts purposely however I think that may be next on the agenda, especially as I work my way though the older greens to some of the newer stuff I’ve recently bought. I especially want to explore brightness and balance, or at the very least try and develop my palette a little more…

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