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  • Latte art and size of jug

    Does it matter? I'm new to this and find it hard! I'm wondering of its because I'm using the smaller 400ml jug to do single cups.

    My foam seems fine although it sometimes seemed a little thick instead of silky. Perhaps thats why its making it hard for consistent flow. Am I doing something wrong?

  • #2
    Are you using full cream or low fat milk brokenvase?

    A good trick i can recommend is if you are steaming enough milk for one cup, do it in the 400ml jug then transfer milk into a 600ml jug. Pour into the cup.
    The reason behind this is the milk coming out of a bigger jug comes out at a shallower trajectory into the cup, and you can get the tip of the spout closer to the surface of the coffee. This will assist in pushing the leaves out. Use a jug with a defined spout.

    Apart from that, the foam should look like wet paint in consistency. If you introduced too much air during the steaming process, it may be too stiff, be difficult to pour and be prone to separation from the milk. Next attempt, try and "stretch" the milk until you only just hear the tch tch sound, then when it;s around 30 degrees C, put the tip below the surface to roll.
    Heat to only 60-65 Deg C as well. Higher temps will have adverse effect on the foam consistency.
    Swirl the milk in the jug before pouring.

    Hope that helps.

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    • #3
      Latte art and size of jug

      Hmm... I was taught to stretch the milk till 40deg. Will try to 30 and pour to bigger jug. Thanks.

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      • #4
        Yes to the stretching to 40, but don't pour into bigger jug just yet. You still have to texture the milk til 60-65 C in the same small jug, and then only pour into the 600ml jug for easier pouring into the cup thereafter. Texturing the milk after stretching breaks down big bubbles as well as heating to the required temperature.

        Enjoy the art and let us know how you go. Post a few pics if you want in the art gallery.

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        • #5
          Latte art and size of jug

          First I have to be able to create something that looks like something first. Feels like I'm a long way off.

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          • #6
            For some people including myself, failures brings a drive to improve technique and seeking of advice and tips.
            Latte art can be daunting in practice after seeing countless videos on Youtube.

            Don;t worry too much on the art at first. Focus on getting the microfoam right and practise getting the coffee tasting good.
            Pour from a height then when the cup is 2/3 full bring the jug down and just pour a blob into the middle of the cup. Then taste.

            Does it taste good? How is the texture and mouthfeel? Is it bitter or sweet?

            After you mastered that, attempt at doing the same step, and then when the cup is almost full, lift and pour across the blob. Now you have something that resembles a heart.

            When you've done a few of those, you can do the heart again but wiggle the jug when pouring the blob, then do the same lift and pour across. Now your heart looks like it has a design.

            When starting out in latte art, start with hearts. They are easy to do before trying the others like tulips, rosettas etc.

            Have fun doing it. When you enjoy it, success comes easier. After all you can drink the results if you don't get it right which is not a loss

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            • #7
              Latte art and size of jug

              I have been struggling with art too, the best I have been able to manage is some odd looking blobs!

              I'll deff give your tips a try too sideways!

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              • #8
                Latte art and size of jug

                Somewhat looking heart... Click image for larger version

Name:	ImageUploadedByTapatalk1346101656.979321.jpg
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                • #9
                  That's a good start. Better than mine when i first started out. .

                  There's a quite a few bubbles on there, and i'm not sure if it's due to beans that's too fresh or the milk had too much air. That's why it's important to texture the milk once the stretching stage is over to get the wet paint consistency.

                  That glass looks like the perfect one for my next tip. Next cup you pour, rest the jug on the rim of the glass so that the spout pours the milk into the center of the cup.
                  Pour with a thin stream. When 2/3 full, use the rim of the glass as the pivot, pour faster so that you get a blob happening.
                  When almost full with about 1 and half cm left, lift and draw across at same time.
                  The act of lifting and pulling across pulls the crema of the espresso into the middle and shapes the heart. Don't be afraid to pull across over the other side of the edge of the glass. You can always clean it up after.

                  Will have to give that Tapatalk a go next time. When it comes to smartphones or anything new technical stuff, I'm the noob.

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                  • #10
                    Brokenvase did you pour that out of a 600 mm jug?
                    That's pretty good. I'm no where near that.

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                    • #11
                      Latte art and size of jug

                      That's a 400ml :P too lazy to pour to the bigger one...

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                      • #12
                        Latte art and size of jug

                        Originally posted by sidewayss View Post
                        That's a good start. Better than mine when i first started out. .

                        There's a quite a few bubbles on there, and i'm not sure if it's due to beans that's too fresh or the milk had too much air. That's why it's important to texture the milk once the stretching stage is over to get the wet paint consistency.

                        That glass looks like the perfect one for my next tip. Next cup you pour, rest the jug on the rim of the glass so that the spout pours the milk into the center of the cup.
                        Pour with a thin stream. When 2/3 full, use the rim of the glass as the pivot, pour faster so that you get a blob happening.
                        When almost full with about 1 and half cm left, lift and draw across at same time.
                        The act of lifting and pulling across pulls the crema of the espresso into the middle and shapes the heart. Don't be afraid to pull across over the other side of the edge of the glass. You can always clean it up after.

                        Will have to give that Tapatalk a go next time. When it comes to smartphones or anything new technical stuff, I'm the noob.
                        The bubbles Are definitely from the crema and coffee. Not sure why. It's like big and almost soapy looking...

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Not to worry.

                          First of all, does the coffee taste good? If it does not taste good, it does not matter how good your art is, IMO it needs to be fixed.

                          We'll take one variable at a time. Try a different batch of beans, perhaps a bag from a reputable roaster or if you have roasted your own, those same beans that you've roasted a while ago should have de-gassed by now.

                          What machine are you using? Is there sufficient steam power?

                          Are you using full cream or skim milk? Try a different milk. Milk can and do go "off". Steaming should stop when jug feels too hot to touch.

                          Does it happen all the time or occasionally?

                          Are you filling the 400ml jug up the halfway mark? (halfway would yield approx 200ml for one cup if you fill to the bottom part of the spout or slightly above of the bottom of the spout, not knowing what make of jug you have, you may want to measure the liquid)

                          Only look at these questions one at a time and take it from there so that you know exactly where the solution lies. Take your time.
                          Last edited by sidewayss; 30 August 2012, 02:10 PM. Reason: i forgot something/s

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                          • #14
                            Latte art and size of jug

                            Originally posted by sidewayss View Post
                            Not to worry.

                            First of all, does the coffee taste good? If it does not taste good, it does not matter how good your art is, IMO it needs to be fixed.

                            We'll take one variable at a time. Try a different batch of beans, perhaps a bag from a reputable roaster or if you have roasted your own, those same beans that you've roasted a while ago should have de-gassed by now.

                            What machine are you using? Is there sufficient steam power?

                            Are you using full cream or skim milk? Try a different milk. Milk can and do go "off". Steaming should stop when jug feels too hot to touch.

                            Does it happen all the time or occasionally?

                            Are you filling the 400ml jug up the halfway mark? (halfway would yield approx 200ml for one cup if you fill to the bottom part of the spout or slightly above of the bottom of the spout, not knowing what make of jug you have, you may want to measure the liquid)

                            Only look at these questions one at a time and take it from there so that you know exactly where the solution lies. Take your time.
                            Thanks for your response and help I know it's the bean. It tastes alright. Just gassy I think. Everything else is fine. Good milk. Yes to frothing with the 400ml Jug. I now learnt to watch. To dip in at either 2/3 full or at 35degs...

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                            • #15
                              ""To dip in at either 2/3 full or at 35degs..."" quoted.
                              To dip means putting the tip of the steam wand below the surface to texture the milk once reaches 35 deg or lukewarm, which serves the purpose of incorporating the bubbles into the milk. This also breaks down the bubbles into microfoam.

                              Spending more time with your machine and practicing will improve the coffee.

                              Doing a barista course is a good investment.

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