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  • Frothing to 55 degrees celcius

    I like my lattes better with the milk at 55 degrees Celsius than 70. 70 is just too hot. But am I missing anything with regards to the frothing process if I don't take the milk up to 70 degrees first, and then let it cool down?

  • #2
    Originally posted by iampivot View Post
    I like my lattes better with the milk at 55 degrees Celsius than 70. 70 is just too hot. But am I missing anything with regards to the frothing process if I don't take the milk up to 70 degrees first, and then let it cool down?
    Not at all, especially if you start with really cold milk, say 4-5 degrees, then you can easily stretch and texture it by the time it gets to 40-45 degrees.

    But 55 seems really cool to me, and I don't like a hot drink. I usually steam to about 61/62 whereas my wife likes it more like 66-67.

    Are you using an accurate thermometer?

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    • #3
      I was always of the understanding that 56ºC was spot on. I like to be able to drink mine straight away too. Cooler = sweeter too IMHO.

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      • #4
        I agree, I turn the steam arm off at 55, it then carries on up to about 60-61. As I do the milk first once it's ready to pour its usually back down to 55.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Jonathon View Post
          Are you using an accurate thermometer?
          What thermometers would you describe as accurate?

          I use an eBay special(not saying it's good or accurate), and often the milk heats up quicker than the needle will follow, so I end up shutting off the steam early allowing a guesstimate of how much the thermometer needle is lagging.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by thegoner View Post
            What thermometers would you describe as accurate?

            I use an eBay special(not saying it's good or accurate), and often the milk heats up quicker than the needle will follow, so I end up shutting off the steam early allowing a guesstimate of how much the thermometer needle is lagging.
            If it has a needle it might be accurate, but far too slow for steaming milk. By the time the needle shows 60, the milk might be 65 or 70. As you say, you have to guess what the lag will be.

            I use an accurite digital probe thermometer, which I periodically calibrate against other thermometers at various temps from 60 up to about 125 degrees, always in liquid. It's very quick, with a delay of maybe a second or two.

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            • #7
              I use SENTRY ST631 infra red to measure temperature for children forehead and water. I notice old people ask for hotter coffee, especially winter time we all do. Some people get upset tummy after drinking room temperature coffee. Just have to cater for all customer for good service.

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              • #8
                I like my milk heated to 60C in the jug, it then climbs to about 65C after shutting the steam off, and presents around 58 to 60C in the cup

                Having recently changed coffee suppliers at work I'm finding it nigh on impossible to serve a hot bonsoy latte without curdling the milk, coz the lighter roast profile of the new coffee has higher acidity - so I never thought I'd say it but I'm now telling customers that they can't have a hot(er than usual) soy latte coz we just can't make em!

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                • #9
                  Looks like my thermometer is showing 6 degrees less than actual temperature, so I guess the milk is just over 60 degrees.

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                  • #10
                    The only downside I can see would be texturing time lost...

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                    • #11
                      I agree that 70C seems too hot to drink. I prefer mine to go to just about 60C on the thermometer.

                      Unlike others, I slow mine down as I'm approaching 60C, probably fully turn steam off at 57-58C and it settles to right about 60-61C without overshooting by 5 or so degrees.

                      My thermometer has 65-70 marked as "froth" zone, which most seem to, but again, I find this far too hot and doesnt taste as good even when it's cooled down.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by nicovington View Post
                        I agree that 70C seems too hot to drink. I prefer mine to go to just about 60C on the thermometer.

                        Unlike others, I slow mine down as I'm approaching 60C, probably fully turn steam off at 57-58C and it settles to right about 60-61C without overshooting by 5 or so degrees.

                        My thermometer has 65-70 marked as "froth" zone, which most seem to, but again, I find this far too hot and doesnt taste as good even when it's cooled down.
                        I use the same thermometer and do the same thing. Steam off just before the needle reaches the red zone, it then settles somewhere between 62 - 65, which is perfect for me. Any hotter and i can definitely notice less sweetness in the milk. Only really drink Piccolos any ways. I have checked with an accurate instant read probe and its within a couple of degrees.

                        As for stretching, your end temp should not make much of a difference. Your stretching should be completed before 20 degrees. Its definitely harder on smaller machines.

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                        • #13
                          I find that the time I spend steaming the milk has a substantial effect on the level of homogenisation (of milk and foam) I can achieve. Therefore, for me, heating that last 5-10 degrees (I stop at 60, which hits ~65) means better results in the cup.

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                          • #14
                            55-60 degrees is what most cafes in Australia should aim for. Having also made coffee in NZ it seems the trend over there is to go slightly hotter and target 60-65 degrees. I personally cater toward the age of the person. Most younger people prefer the 50-60 temp. Whereas 50+ year olds have lost half of their taste buds and require that little bit hotter ... only 2seconds more of steaming.

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