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Seems what we need is 15Bar steam.

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  • Seems what we need is 15Bar steam.

    Today's Age Epicure Coffee advertorial tripe.

    Bugger. My home and commercial machines only produce steam at circa 1.2-1.5 Bar. Where do I get me one of these 15 Bar steamers?

    Milk tips for the home barista
    mugshot
    matt holden
    A recent video on Slate.com  shows how to make frothed milk at home with nothing more than a mason jar and a microwave (after the microwaving they suggest you put the frothy milk in a cup and add filter coffee). But such a preppy crappuccino wouldn’t cut it in a Melbourne household. And who has mason jars anyway?

    Texturing milk is simple if you’re working with a commercial machine that pumps out steam at 15 bars, and even easier for the Victorian latte art champion, Sensory Lab’sBen Morrow. With the machine prepped, Morrow can have the milk ready in 10 or 15 seconds: silky, glossy, slick are the words he uses to describe well-textured milk. ‘‘When you’ve finished steaming it and you move it around in the jug it should still feel malleable,’’ he says. ‘‘When it’s at its peak, it’s hard to tell the foam from the liquid. It’s like whipping meringue.’’ But with domestic machines making steam at only five or six bars, the task is a little harder.

    ‘‘You can make good texture with any kind of nozzle,’’ says Morrow. ‘‘But if you have low pressure it’s hard. The pressure is too low if it takes more than about a minute to heat the milk.’’ At home, go slow and steady, he says. Start with fresh, full-cream milk, and while cold milk is preferable, using room temperature milk will help get it hot quicker. Just submerge the tip of the steam nozzle in the milk, a little off centre in the jug, with the jug tilted to 45 degrees. Then open the steam valve, and when a vortex forms around the nozzle, lift it slightly. Focus on maintaining the vortex, says Morrow. ‘‘Slowly bring in small amounts of air,’’ he says. ‘‘You want that ‘crisping’ sound in little bursts – otherwise you get bubbles that are too large.’’ The vortex keeps the milk spinning in the jug, which breaks large bubbles down into microfoam. Work until the jug feels just too hot to touch. Aim for a five per cent increase in volume, says Morrow, which will keep the foam integrated in the milk, not separate. Banging the jug on the bench breaks up the larger bubbles, and if you want to work on your latte art, Morrow suggests YouTube – and his Instagram.

  • #2
    Chris you've clearly got more patience than me in reading his stuff. Please let me know when he writes a coffee-related article that doesn't involve one of his mates and I'll then bother to read it.

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    • #3
      Apart from the obvious errors in his post, the use of "bars" really irks me.

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      • #4
        ...aim for 5% increase in volume ....
        ??.. Really ?...good luck estimating that !

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        • #5
          Originally posted by MrJack View Post
          Apart from the obvious errors in his post, the use of "bars" really irks me.
          can i ask why?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Col3 View Post
            can i ask why?
            Probably because "bars" isn't a unit of measurement whereas "bar" is.

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            • #7
              *blink* *blink*...

              "...domestic machines making steam at only five or six bars..." @Talk_Coffee: I think my VBM Domobar Junior must be broken

              Originally posted by noidle22 View Post
              Probably because "bars" isn't a unit of measurement whereas "bar" is.
              Maybe "bars" is one of those newfangled metricated measurement units denoting tenths of bar

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              • #8
                Originally posted by noidle22 View Post
                Probably because "bars" isn't a unit of measurement whereas "bar" is.
                cool thanks. the lazy engineer in me didn't see the difference but I appreciate your point.

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                • #9
                  Although my dad's the only one I've ever heard say "a couple of metre" :-)

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                  • #10
                    Is your dad Con the Fruiterer, by any chance?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Col3 View Post
                      cool thanks. the lazy engineer in me didn't see the difference but I appreciate your point.
                      I've come across plenty of reports and datasheets where lazy engineers (likely mechanical ) have done the same thing. Irks me then too...

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by MrJack View Post
                        I've come across plenty of reports and datasheets where lazy engineers (likely mechanical ) have done the same thing. Irks me then too...
                        MrJack is it really that obvious?

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Barry O'Speedwagon View Post
                          Is your dad Con the Fruiterer, by any chance?
                          :-)

                          You got the European part right. Swiss, rather than Greek though.

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