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  • Coffee to hot to drink

    Most of the time, the coffee's I get are too hot to drink, first sip burns the tongue or lips. But the other day I enjoyed two great tasting coffee's with amazing art, (this guy knew what he was doing) and could drink them straight away. It got me thinking that it has to be the milk that causes the coffee to be too hot to drink, the shot is poured and sits for a short time before the milk is added.
    So do most people, corner cafe workers, not know how to froth properly and therefore over heat the milk, and the larger the cup size ordered the more milk, the longer it takes to froth, so getting even hotter.

  • #2
    Some people like really, really hot milk, e.g., smokers; older folks. Depending on clientele a café may get lots of requests for hotter drinks. The overall trend I've been observing is cooler drinks - meaning cooler milk temperatures. Resteaming milk (which unfortunately happens) can result in higher temperatures and scalded milk as well. No thermometers; lack of quality training, etc.

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    • #3
      The espresso shot isn't causing the excess heat, it's the milk being steamed to excess. Hot milk is terrible in my opinion, it loses its sweetness and burns the mouth. My parents do love a steaming hot coffee though!

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      • #4
        Originally posted by sprezzatura View Post
        Some people like really, really hot milk, e.g., smokers; older folks. Depending on clientele a café may get lots of requests for hotter drinks. The overall trend I've been observing is cooler drinks - meaning cooler milk temperatures. Resteaming milk (which unfortunately happens) can result in higher temperatures and scalded milk as well. No thermometers; lack of quality training, etc.
        Not sure about the older folk Sprezz, I'm an older folk and a strong believer in the Goldilocks principal.

        "The Goldilocks principle states that something must fall within certain margins, as opposed to reaching extremes. When the effects of the principle are observed, it is known as the Goldilocks effect."

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        • #5
          Yep. Broad generalisation. Most folks go Goldilocks (I do); some exceptions by request (takeaway; just ... like it hotter).

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          • #6
            Can understand the take away request, allowing for cooling prior to consumption.

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            • #7
              We are definitely older folk! Our early morning (6:30am) coffee shop is happy to make us a "warm latte" @ 65C. Perfect, the full flavor of the beans, their natural sweetness and a hint of chocolate. What a great way to start the day!
              I do the same at home.
              We switched to a take away latte because there is a customer trend to a strong flat white that we find quite unpleasant - no nuance at all!

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              • #8
                See this a ton around me at the local cafes, mainly from non caring 'baristas' i use the term lightly that just burn the milk, usually because they just stick it under the steam wand and leave it until it is whistling like a kettle lol. Really annoys the shit out of me when I hear that whistle When someone's steaming milk. Thank God we also have a few very good cafes around us with awesome attentive baristas that do it properly.

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                • #9
                  going to try this at home today. thanks for sharing here

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                  • #10
                    Best advice to get your milk right is to buy a milk thermometer and do not heat hotter than 72°C for those that like it hot. Otherwise anywhere from 65-70°C.

                    Once you get a thermometer, you'll be amazed at how far off you are when you go by "feel", not to mention being kinder to the nerve cells in your hand.

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                    • #11
                      Another option to consider, which I find is less hassle than a thermometer (with none of that evil washing up) is to stick a TempTag on the side of your jugs (milk jugs that is) and when the sticker first goes yellow count to no more than 10 seconds in your head- I've never had overheated milk using this method).

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                      • #12
                        Temperature changes the taste of the coffee. We have a large latte take away each morning - we still sit in our favourites seats. I noticed that at 63C it was good, as it cooled the sweetness became more pronounced and the chocolate tones emerged. When the coffee became luke warm, around 50C is began to loose its balance. Then of course as an iced coffee it has quite a different taste.

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                        • #13
                          I saw this thread title and couldn't help but tell my story of today's coffee, as my tongue is still scalded

                          Wife and I bought two large caps (I've started going caps for any t/a coffees lately as I find the choc can offset a bitter coffee somewhat. That's how much faith I have in most cafes) and knew I was in for a beauty when I heard no grinding of beans.
                          I stupidly took a sip immediately and I reckon if it was possible to heat milk above 100 degrees, she managed it.

                          We waited in the car for 20 mins until my 2 year old woke up, and the coffees were still too hot to drink. After two hours in the park, we returned to the car and the coffees were still drinking temperature! Not hot, but what you would expect a normal coffee to be after say 5 minutes.

                          No wonder I don't like to buy coffees out.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by K_Bean_Coffee
                            I bought a long black at the airport and still couldn't touch it after 10 minutes, so had to chuck the whole lot out before boarding. Grrrrr.....
                            If it was like most Airport coffees you probably did yourself a favour by not touching it ******. #swill

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                            • #15
                              I usually prefer the Aeropress for use on the plane. Gets some strange looks but less chance of spillage.

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