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What type of milk do you use in coffee? Poll.

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  • #46
    Keeping the slight bend in the conversation going ( sorry OP, i use a quality brand cow milk if i can afford or want to splurge or otherwise just generic brand)

    I am a bit of a nutrition craze/fad sceptic and so quite enjoyed Hamish and Andy's comparing of Corn kernel water to Coconut water as the next good thing!!! But i have been hyper critical of almond milk,,, which in most cases is only about 2 percent almond milk.. but in the interest of fairness . cows milk is about 87 percent water , so maybe the use of the word Milk is a bit of a stretch in all cases ( pun intended)

    Thanks for the abc link Yelta very interesting

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    • #47
      Originally posted by NJD View Post
      I use a locally owned Baffle creek or Central Queensland branded full cream milk pasteurised only because nothing else compares . But I also urge everyone to please when the product / milk you are buying is available from small local growers or co operatives , choose them over the large supermarket grubs . Support our local farmers first and foremost , you won’t be disappointed .
      Same. I am on Sunshine Coast QLD and buy Maleny Dairy Farmer's Choice. Yummy.

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      • #48
        lactose intolerance hasn't left me with many options

        also found lactose free milk a bit weird

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        • #49
          This is an interesting link https://milk.procon.org/lactose-intolerance-by-country/ Obviously race and genetics play a major role in how humans handle milk products.

          Any observations along these lines?🙂

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          • #50
            About 12,000-15,000 years ago a mutation occurred in Northern Europe which meant people could continue to digest milk after the initial period of being breastfed. Essentially after weaning at a young age we would stop producing lactase which broke the lactose down, but after the mutation occurred we kept producing into adulthood and could continue to enjoy the highly nutritious milk.

            Prior to this individuals could still tolerate milk into adulthood, but this appeared to be the first time a general population could. This also meant that keeping animals (like cows) that produced milk and farming them made a massive difference to our quality of life. It also meant that the cooler parts of Europe could be inhabited throughout a long winter as long as cows continued to lactate and hence farming animals made even more sense! And we also had under our belt by then a decent amount of practice farming grains and other items we could store for long periods.

            While the mutation wasn't specific to Northern Europe and parts of Africa did go through a similar thing, it meant most of the European peoples continued to develop farming and slowly work out ways to keep milk products edible like yogurt and cheese etc. It also meant that large parts of Africa and most of Asia never had a need to do the same thing as most of those continents didn't have the long winter periods - or at least where the settlements at the time were. So it somewhat explains why most Asian and African people don't have the same tolerance to dairy in adulthood - although there are exceptions to this!

            Naturally this is a huge oversimplification.

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            • #51
              Originally posted by WhatEverBeansNecessary View Post
              About 12,000-15,000 years ago a mutation occurred in Northern Europe which meant people could continue to digest milk after the initial period of being breastfed. Essentially after weaning at a young age we would stop producing lactase which broke the lactose down, but after the mutation occurred we kept producing into adulthood and could continue to enjoy the highly nutritious milk. Prior to this individuals could still tolerate milk into adulthood, but this appeared to be the first time a general population could. This also meant that keeping animals (like cows) that produced milk and farming them made a massive difference to our quality of life. It also meant that the cooler parts of Europe could be inhabited throughout a long winter as long as cows continued to lactate and hence farming animals made even more sense! And we also had under our belt by then a decent amount of practice farming grains and other items we could store for long periods. While the mutation wasn't specific to Northern Europe and parts of Africa did go through a similar thing, it meant most of the European peoples continued to develop farming and slowly work out ways to keep milk products edible like yogurt and cheese etc. It also meant that large parts of Africa and most of Asia never had a need to do the same thing as most of those continents didn't have the long winter periods - or at least where the settlements at the time were. So it somewhat explains why most Asian and African people don't have the same tolerance to dairy in adulthood - although there are exceptions to this! Naturally this is a huge oversimplification.
              Oh wow is that so... that's really interesting, had no idea! Puts a bit of clarity into things, especially towards that argument I keep hearing that humans aren't meant to consume animal milk

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              • #52
                Originally posted by simonsk8r View Post
                I keep hearing that humans aren't meant to consume animal milk
                I am not so sure about this. I think we are.

                It was our ability to farm, harvest and store food for significant periods of time that meant we no longer had to roam the wilderness to find food that meant we could settle in one location for a long time. Adaptations/mutations like the ability to consume lactose into adulthood meant we spent less time hunting and gathering to focus on other developments and we could specialise our talents into grain farming, herding or eventually things like blacksmiths, doctors or baristas! I think it's a fluid argument to say our ancestors never ate this or that and weren't overweight or suffer from xyz ailment etc - they also only lived to the ripe old age of 40.

                Anyway, well off topic now

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                • #53
                  Full cream only for me or almond.

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